Rheology

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Rheology is the study of the flow of matter: primarily in the liquid state, but also as 'soft solids' or solids under conditions in which they respond with plastic flow rather than deforming elastically in response to an applied force. It applies to substances which have a complex molecular structure, such as muds, sludges, suspensions, polymers and other glass formers (e.g. silicates), as well as many foods and additives, bodily fluids (e.g. blood) and other biological materials. (Wikipedia.org)






Conferences related to Rheology

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2014 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS 2014)

  • 2013 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS 2013)

    Papers are solicited in all related areas in robotics and intelligent systems. Proposals for tutorials and workshops, as well as organized/special sessions are also welcome to address the emerging areas and innovative applications of new technologies.

  • 2012 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS 2012)

    The 2012 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS 2012) will be held in Vilamoura-Algarve, Portugal, during October 7-11, 2012. The theme of the conference will be Robotics for Quality of Life and Sustainable Development. Papers are solicited in all related areas in robotics and intelligent systems. Proposals for tutorials and workshops, as well as organized/special sessions are also welcome to address the emerging areas and innovative applications of new technologies.

  • 2011 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS 2011)

    The 2011 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS 2011) will be held in San Francisco, California, USA, during September 25-30, 2011. The theme of the conference will be Human- Centered Robotics, and its format will feature innovations in the form of interactive multimedia presentations and special-topic symposia celebrating 50 years of robotics.

  • 2010 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS 2010)

    Papers are solicited in all related areas in robotics and intelligent systems. Proposals and tutorials and workshops, as well as organized/special sessions are also welcome to address the emerging areas and innovative applications of new technologies.

  • 2009 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS 2009)

    Papers are solicited in all related areas in robotics and intelligent systems. Proposals for tutorials and workshops, as well as organized/special sessions are also welcome to address the emerging areas and innovative applications of new technologies.

  • 2008 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS 2008)

    IROS 2008 serves as an international forum for robotics researchers to discuss and exchange their ideas on technical problems and their solutions. Conference includes technical presentations, tutorials and workshops, exhibits, posters, competitions, plenary session, and panel discussions.

  • 2007 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS 2007)


2010 International Conference on Biology, Environment and Chemistry (ICBEC)

ICBEC is an international forum for state-of-the-art research in Biology, Environment and Chemistry. It also serves to foster communication among researchers and practitioners working in a wide variety of scientific areas with a common interest in improving Biology, Environment and Chemistry related techniques.


2010 International Conference on Mechanic Automation and Control Engineering (MACE)

Manufacturing Control and Automation Engineering,CAD/CAM/CIM and Simulation, Materials Processing and Control, Instruments and Vibration Control


2009 31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC)

The annual conference of EMBS averages 2000 attendees from over 50 countries. The scope of the conference is general in nature to focus on the interdisciplinary fields of biomedical engineering. Themes included but not limited to are: Imaging, Biosignals, Biorobotics, Bioinstrumentation, Neural, Rehabilitation, Bioinformatics, Healthcare IT, Medical Devices, etc


2008 2nd International Conference on Bioinformatics and Biomedical Engineering (iCBBE)

Bioinfomatics, Protein Structure and Function, Structure Based Drug Design, Biomedical Engineering,Micro- and Nano-Biotechnologies,Medical Imaging Techniques,Telemedicine and Related Technology,Biosensors, Environment Impacts to Human Beings, etc.



Periodicals related to Rheology

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Components and Packaging Technologies, IEEE Transactions on

Component parts, hybrid microelectronics, materials, packaging techniques, and manufacturing technology.


Control Systems Technology, IEEE Transactions on

Serves as a compendium for papers on the technological advances in control engineering and as an archival publication which will bridge the gap between theory and practice. Papers will highlight the latest knowledge, exploratory developments, and practical applications in all aspects of the technology needed to implement control systems from analysis and design through simulation and hardware.


Magnetics, IEEE Transactions on

Science and technology related to the basic physics and engineering of magnetism, magnetic materials, applied magnetics, magnetic devices, and magnetic data storage. The Transactions publishes scholarly articles of archival value as well as tutorial expositions and critical reviews of classical subjects and topics of current interest.



Most published Xplore authors for Rheology

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Xplore Articles related to Rheology

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Melt processible plasticised polyanilines

S. J. Davies; T. G. Ryan; C. J. Wilde International Conference on Science and Technology of Synthetic Metals, 1994

Summary form only given. A family of plasticised polyanilines suitable for melt extrusion and moulding applications have been developed as part of an EEC supported BRITE EURAM project. A procedure has been developed in which the emeraldine base form of polyaniline is combined with both a dopant and plasticiser to give complexes that provide melt formable products with high electrical ...


On the behaviour of the rheological and magnetic parameters of densified &#947;-Fe<inf>2</inf>O<inf>3</inf>

G. Bottoni; D. Candolfo; A. Cecchetti; A. Corradi; F. Masoli; E. Ceresa; L. Salvioli IEEE Transactions on Magnetics, 1980

Magnetic characteristics (coercivity, remanent coercivity, remanence/saturation ratio, coercivity factor) and rheological properties (tap density, apparent density and wettability) for a number of γ-Fe2O3samples are analyzed. The samples are the following: I. γ-Fe2O3produced from densified α-FeOOH at various densification times; II. Densified γ-Fe2O3withdrawn from the densifier at different densification times; III. Densified and non- densified materials available on the market. The ...


Investigations of stress sensitivity of 0.12 CMOS technology using process modeling

V. Senez; T. Hoffmann; E. Robilliart; G. Bouche; H. Jaouen; M. Lunenborg; G. Carnevale International Electron Devices Meeting. Technical Digest (Cat. No.01CH37224), 2001

This paper presents a mechanical analysis of the entire process flow (i.e.: Front (FEOL) and Back (BEOL) End of Line) of a 0.12 CMOS technology using 2D numerical modeling. This study gives several quantitative modifications concerning the process conditions and device geometries in order to reduce the residual mechanical stress in the devices.


Numerical simulation of electrorheological properties of anisotropically filled elastomers

Bo Liu; S. A. Boggs; M. T. Shaw 1999 Annual Report Conference on Electrical Insulation and Dielectric Phenomena (Cat. No.99CH36319), 1999

We report the results of numerical simulations for the change of both mechanical and electrical properties of elastomers with anisotropically filled polarizable particles under the electric and mechanical fields. Such composites have potential applications in electro-mechanical control. We have used numerical techniques to study the effect of particle shape, permittivity/conductivity ratio, and spatial arrangement on the shear modulus as a ...


Effect of electret on surface charge of red blood cell in scalded rats

J. Jiang; L. L. Cui; Z. F. Xia; X. P. Wang; C. R. Song Proceedings. 11th International Symposium on Electrets, 2002

The electrophoretic mobility (EPM) and contents of sialic acid (SA) on the red blood cell (RBC) were determined by means of cell electrophoresis and SA micro-chemical calorimetry to explore the mechanism of effect electret on surface charge of RBC in scalded rats. The results indicated that (1) EPM and SA contents of RBC in each period after rat scalded were ...


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Educational Resources on Rheology

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eLearning

Melt processible plasticised polyanilines

S. J. Davies; T. G. Ryan; C. J. Wilde International Conference on Science and Technology of Synthetic Metals, 1994

Summary form only given. A family of plasticised polyanilines suitable for melt extrusion and moulding applications have been developed as part of an EEC supported BRITE EURAM project. A procedure has been developed in which the emeraldine base form of polyaniline is combined with both a dopant and plasticiser to give complexes that provide melt formable products with high electrical ...


On the behaviour of the rheological and magnetic parameters of densified &#947;-Fe<inf>2</inf>O<inf>3</inf>

G. Bottoni; D. Candolfo; A. Cecchetti; A. Corradi; F. Masoli; E. Ceresa; L. Salvioli IEEE Transactions on Magnetics, 1980

Magnetic characteristics (coercivity, remanent coercivity, remanence/saturation ratio, coercivity factor) and rheological properties (tap density, apparent density and wettability) for a number of γ-Fe2O3samples are analyzed. The samples are the following: I. γ-Fe2O3produced from densified α-FeOOH at various densification times; II. Densified γ-Fe2O3withdrawn from the densifier at different densification times; III. Densified and non- densified materials available on the market. The ...


Investigations of stress sensitivity of 0.12 CMOS technology using process modeling

V. Senez; T. Hoffmann; E. Robilliart; G. Bouche; H. Jaouen; M. Lunenborg; G. Carnevale International Electron Devices Meeting. Technical Digest (Cat. No.01CH37224), 2001

This paper presents a mechanical analysis of the entire process flow (i.e.: Front (FEOL) and Back (BEOL) End of Line) of a 0.12 CMOS technology using 2D numerical modeling. This study gives several quantitative modifications concerning the process conditions and device geometries in order to reduce the residual mechanical stress in the devices.


Numerical simulation of electrorheological properties of anisotropically filled elastomers

Bo Liu; S. A. Boggs; M. T. Shaw 1999 Annual Report Conference on Electrical Insulation and Dielectric Phenomena (Cat. No.99CH36319), 1999

We report the results of numerical simulations for the change of both mechanical and electrical properties of elastomers with anisotropically filled polarizable particles under the electric and mechanical fields. Such composites have potential applications in electro-mechanical control. We have used numerical techniques to study the effect of particle shape, permittivity/conductivity ratio, and spatial arrangement on the shear modulus as a ...


Effect of electret on surface charge of red blood cell in scalded rats

J. Jiang; L. L. Cui; Z. F. Xia; X. P. Wang; C. R. Song Proceedings. 11th International Symposium on Electrets, 2002

The electrophoretic mobility (EPM) and contents of sialic acid (SA) on the red blood cell (RBC) were determined by means of cell electrophoresis and SA micro-chemical calorimetry to explore the mechanism of effect electret on surface charge of RBC in scalded rats. The results indicated that (1) EPM and SA contents of RBC in each period after rat scalded were ...


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IEEE.tv Videos

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IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Author Index

    Tectonic faults are sites of localized motion, both at the Earth's surface and within its dynamic interior. Faulting is directly linked to a wide range of global phenomena, including long-term climate change and the evolution of hominids, the opening and closure of oceans, and the rise and fall of mountain ranges. In Tectonic Faults, scientists from a variety of disciplines explore the connections between faulting and the processes of the Earth's atmosphere, surface, and interior. They consider faults and faulting from many different vantage points--including those of surface analysts, geochemists, material scientists, and physicists--and in all scales, from seismic fault slip to moving tectonic plates. They address basic issues, including the imaging of faults from Earth's surface to the base of the lithosphere and deeper, the structure and rheology of fault rocks, and the role of fluids and melt on the physical properties of deforming rock. They suggest strategies for understanding the interaction of faulting with topography and climate, predicting fault behavior, and interpreting the impacts on the rock record and the human environment. Using an Earth Systems approach, Tectonic Faults provides a new understanding of feedback between faulting and Earth's atmospheric, surface, and interior processes, and recommends new approaches for advancing knowledge of tectonic faults as an integral part of our dynamic planet.

  • Subject Index

    Tectonic faults are sites of localized motion, both at the Earth's surface and within its dynamic interior. Faulting is directly linked to a wide range of global phenomena, including long-term climate change and the evolution of hominids, the opening and closure of oceans, and the rise and fall of mountain ranges. In Tectonic Faults, scientists from a variety of disciplines explore the connections between faulting and the processes of the Earth's atmosphere, surface, and interior. They consider faults and faulting from many different vantage points--including those of surface analysts, geochemists, material scientists, and physicists--and in all scales, from seismic fault slip to moving tectonic plates. They address basic issues, including the imaging of faults from Earth's surface to the base of the lithosphere and deeper, the structure and rheology of fault rocks, and the role of fluids and melt on the physical properties of deforming rock. They suggest strategies for understanding the interaction of faulting with topography and climate, predicting fault behavior, and interpreting the impacts on the rock record and the human environment. Using an Earth Systems approach, Tectonic Faults provides a new understanding of feedback between faulting and Earth's atmospheric, surface, and interior processes, and recommends new approaches for advancing knowledge of tectonic faults as an integral part of our dynamic planet.

  • Fluid Processes in Deep Crustal Fault Zones

    Fluid as a C-O-H dominated phase is widespread, but not ubiquitous, in the Earth's crust. The presence or absence of fluid is in large part a function of thermal history, at least up to the onset of melting. Rocks containing relatively low-temperature assemblages that are subject to further heating release fluid and so are commonly saturated, while rocks undergoing cooling resorb fluid into hydrous minerals and so are dry. Fluid may be introduced from external sources during faulting or magmatic activity, and the degree to which it persists depends on the interplay between injection rates and reaction rates. Where fluids do occur in the crust, fluxes are generally low, so that many aspects of fluid chemistry are dictated by saturation with rock- forming minerals. These mineralogical controls on fluid chemistry and activities of volatile species further affect the rheology of the crust by determining whether or not deformation can be fluxed by fluid processes. It is argued that rocks undergoing progressive metamorphism are wet and experience widespread deformation, while rocks that are cooling are strong and deformation is localized into zones, particularly during times of fluid infiltration. The transition between brittle and ductile behavior may therefore reflect changes in the availability of water rather than changes in temperature. Faults themselves are important loci of fluid flow, but it is often difficult to identify the sources of fluid, because geochemical tracers are mainly reset in a rock-dominated environment. Nevertheless, it is unlikely that faults are commonly effective drains of fluid being released by prograde metamorphism, because the very low permeability of such rocks (inferred from evidence for strong overpressuring) means that fluid cannot easily drain into fractures, even where a strong gradient in hydraulic head exists.

  • Group Report: Rheology of Fault Rocks and Their Surroundings

    This chapter contains sections titled: Overview, Large-Scale View of the Earthquake Machine, Seismic Cycle: Nucleation Leading to Unstable Slip, Seismic Cycle: Dynamic Rupture, Fault Zone Restrengthening During Co-, Post-, and Inter-Seismic Periods, Fault Geometry and the Significance of Distributed Damage, Subduction Thrusts, Stress on Faults, Summary, References

  • Continental Fault Structure and Rheology from the Frictional-to-Viscous Transition Downward

    Faulting is an expression of the interaction between rock rheology, kinematic boundary conditions, and associated stress fields. The structure and rheology of faults vary with depth, such that pressure-dependent frictional behavior predominating in the upper, brittle part of the crust is transitional to strongly temperature- and rate-dependent behavior in the lower part of the crust and mantle. This frictional-to-viscous transition (FVT) is characterized by changes in rock structure, rheology, and fluid activity that are closely tied to the earthquake cycle. As such, the FVT is a first-order decoupling zone, whose depth and lateral extent vary in time. Brittle, sometimes seismic, instabilities perturb the ambient stress field within the lithosphere on timescales ranging from seconds to years. These instabilities are measurable as transient motions of the Earth's surface and are manifest both at, and below, the FVT by the development of structural anisotropies (fractures, foliations). Surface motion studies of plate-boundary strike-slip faults indicate that shearing below the FVT is more localized in the lower crust than in the upper mantle. Structural investigations of exhumed shear zones reveal that this localization involves the nucleation of fractures at the FVT, as well as the buckling and rotation of existing foliations below the FVT. In some cases, rotation of these surfaces can initiate transient deformation, transferring stress upward and potentially triggering earthquakes. The networking of shear zones on several length scales allows them to function as decoupling horizons that partition three-dimensional strain within the lithosphere. The simplification of fault geometry with progressive strain lends justification to the use of laboratory-derived flow laws to estimate the bulk rock rheology on length scales at which strain is homogeneous. In general, the longer the timeand length scales of faulting considered, the greater the potential influence of the kinematic and thermal history on the rheology of the fault system. Taken together, studies suggest that future fault modeling must include parameters that quantify the thermal and structural aspects of rock history, as well as the fluid activity in and around faults.

  • LeadFree Solder Paste Technology

    This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction Materials Rheology Applications Reflow Soldering Microstructures of Reflowed Joints Challenges of Lead-Free Reflow Soldering Summary References

  • Seismic Fault Rheology and Earthquake Dynamics

    As preparation for this Dahlem Workshop on The Dynamics of Fault Zones, specifically on the subtopic "Rheology of Fault Rocks and Their Surroundings," we addressed critical research issues for understanding the seismic response of fault zones in terms of the constitutive response of fault materials. This requires new concepts and a host of new observations and experiments to document material response, to understand the shear localization process and the inception of earthquake instability, and especially to understand the mechanisms of fault weakening and dynamics of rupture tip propagation and arrest during rapid, possibly large, slip in natural events. We examine in turn the geological structure of fault zones and its relation to earthquake dynamics, the description of rate and state friction at slow rates appropriate to the interseismic period and earthquake nucleation, and the dynamics of fault weakening during rapid slip. The last topic gets special attention in view of the important recent advances in theoretical concepts and experiments to probe the range of slip rates prevailing during earthquakes. We then address the assembly of the constitutive framework into viable, but necessarily simplified, conceptual and computational models for description of the dynamics of crustal earthquake rupture. This is done principally in the slip-weakening framework, and we examine some of the uncertainties in doing so, and issues of how new understanding of the rapid large slip range will be integrated to model the traction evolution and the weakening process during large slip episodes.



Standards related to Rheology

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