Conferences related to Problem-solving

Back to Top

2014 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE)

The Frontiers in Education (FIE)Conference is the major international conference about educational innovations and research in engineering and computing. FIE 2014 continues a long tradition of disseminating results in these areas. It is an ideal forum for sharing ideas; learning about developments in computer science, engineering, and technology education; and interacting with colleagues in these fields.

  • 2013 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE)

    The Frontiers in Education (FIE)Conference is the major international conference about educational innovations and research in engineering and computing. FIE 2013 continues a long tradition of disseminating results in these areas. It is an ideal forum for sharing ideas; learning about developments in computer science, engineering, and technology education; and interacting with colleagues in these fields.

  • 2012 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE)

    The Frontiers in Education (FIE)Conference is the major international conference about educational innovations and research in engineering and computing. FIE 2012 continues a long tradition of disseminating results in these areas. It is an ideal forum for sharing ideas; learning about developments in computer science, engineering, and technology education; and interacting with colleagues in these fields.

  • 2011 Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE)

    The Frontiers in Education (FIE) Conference is the major international conference about educational innovations and research in engineering and computing. FIE 2011 continues a long tradition of disseminating results in these areas. It is an ideal forum for sharing ideas; learning about developments in computer science, engineering, and technology education; and interacting with colleagues in these fields.

  • 2010 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE)

    (FIE) Conference is a major international conference devoted to improvements in computer science, engineering, and technology (CSET) education. FIE 2008 continues a long tradition of disseminating educational research results and innovative practices in CSET education. It is an ideal forum for sharing ideas, learning about developments in CSET education, and interacting with colleagues.


2013 Biomedical Sciences and Engineering Conference (BSEC)

The central theme of the conference is Integrating Experiments, Simulations and Modeling for Biomedical Advances: From Single Molecules to Public Health Dynamics. From studying individual molecular events to modeling how diseases spread within heterogeneous populations, there is an increasing need to integrate information from disparate sources (including social media and crowd-sourcing), high through-put experiments to large-scale computational simulations, multi-modality patient data. Mathematical modeling and analysis are indispensible in understanding spatiotemporal behaviors of complex biomedical systems. Bringing together researchers from disparate scientific disciplines and organizations is essential to gain novel insights and to propose innovative solutions to the theoretical, methodological and analytical problems of such challenging knowledge discovery undertake. The conference will cover both basic research and translational aspects of interdisciplinary collaborations.

  • 2011 Biomedical Sciences and Engineering Conference (BSEC)

    Image formation & processing, Multi-modality integration and inference, Computer-aided diagnostics and prognostics, Informatics and data management

  • 2010 Biomedical Sciences and Engineering Conference (BSEC)

    BSEC 2010 will highlight biomedical research and analysis in neuroscience (BRAiN) with specific emphasis on brain injuries and neuro-regeneration. Session topics include neuroscience applications of biomedical informatics, biomedical modeling and simulation, neuroscience applications of measurement science, and neuroscience/neuroanatomy.

  • 2009 First Annual ORNL Biomedical Science & Engineering Conference (BSEC): Exploring the Intersections of Interdisciplinary Biomedical Research

    This conference provides an opportunity for researchers from cross-cutting disciplines to discover new technologies, exchange ideas, research experiences, and visions in the fields of biomedical informatics, modeling, measurement science, and imaging technologies. The conference theme is: Innovative, interdisciplinary research trends in biomedical technologies and research for maximum application-specific problem solving.


2013 IEEE 17th International Conference on Intelligent Engineering Systems (INES)

The aim of INES conference series is to provide researchers andpractitioners from industry and academia with a platform to report on recent developments inthe area of computational intelligence.


2013 IEEE Symposium on Swarm Intelligence (SIS)

It will be part of the IEEE Symposium Series on Computational Intelligence 2013, which consists of over 20 symposia. The theme of the SIS2013 is to provide a platform for researchers, academicians, students, engineers, and government officers from all over the world to share and exchange information in the swarm intelligence research areas ranging from algorithm development to real-world applications. Authors are invited to submit their original and unpublished work related to swarm intelligence, including research, theory, development, and applications.


2013 Joint IFSA World Congress and NAFIPS Annual Meeting (IFSA/NAFIPS)

IFSA-NAFIPS 2013 aims to bring together researchers, engineers and practitioners to present the latest achievements and innovations in the area of fuzzy information processing, to discuss thought-provoking developments and challenges.


More Conferences

Periodicals related to Problem-solving

Back to Top

Computer

Computer, the flagship publication of the IEEE Computer Society, publishes peer-reviewed technical content that covers all aspects of computer science, computer engineering, technology, and applications. Computer is a resource that practitioners, researchers, and managers can rely on to provide timely information about current research developments, trends, best practices, and changes in the profession.


Engineering Management Review, IEEE

Reprints articles from other publications of significant interest to members. The papers are aimed at those engaged in managing research, development, or engineering activities. Reprints make it possible for the readers to receive the best of today's literature without having to subscribe to and read other periodicals.


Knowledge and Data Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Artificial intelligence techniques, including speech, voice, graphics, images, and documents; knowledge and data engineering tools and techniques; parallel and distributed processing; real-time distributed processing; system architectures, integration, and modeling; database design, modeling, and management; query design, and implementation languages; distributed database control; statistical databases; algorithms for data and knowledge management; performance evaluation of algorithms and systems; data communications aspects; system ...


Learning Technologies, IEEE Transactions on

The IEEE Transactions on Learning Technologies publishes archival research papers and critical survey papers on technology advances in online learning systems; intelligent tutors; educational software applications and games; simulation systems for education and training; collaborative learning tools, devices and interfaces for learning; interactive techniques for learning; tools for formative and summative assessment; ontologies for learning systems; standards and web services ...


Pervasive Computing, IEEE

The popularity of mobile Internet access, third- and fourth-generation wireless communication, handheld devices, and Bluetooth have made pervasive computing a reality. To help you keep pace, IEEE Pervasive Computing covers mobile computing, wireless networks, security, scalability, intelligent vehicles and environments, and pervasive computing applications.


More Periodicals

Most published Xplore authors for Problem-solving

Back to Top

Xplore Articles related to Problem-solving

Back to Top

Agents for distributed decision-making

S. Talukdar 2003 IEEE Power Engineering Society General Meeting (IEEE Cat. No.03CH37491), 2003

Agents are modules from which problem solving can be built. Structurally, an agent is a bundle of sensors, decision-makers and actuators; behaviorally, an agent is a mapping from an in-space (all the things the agent can sense) to an out-space (all things the agent can affect). Agents can be simple or compound. More specifically, lesser agents can be organized into ...


The design process: properties, paradigms, and structure

D. Braha; O. Maimon IEEE Transactions on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics - Part A: Systems and Humans, 1997

In this paper, we examine the logic and methodology of engineering design from the perspective of the philosophy of science. The fundamental characteristics of design problems and design processes are discussed and analyzed. These characteristics establish the framework within which different design paradigms are examined. Following the discussions on descriptive properties of design, and the prescriptive role of design paradigms, ...


Intelligent hybrid multi-agent computational architecture for complex systems

R. Khosla 1997 IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics. Computational Cybernetics and Simulation, 1997

Intelligent Multi-Agent Hybrid Distributed Architecture (IMAHDA) for complex systems has been defined at the task structure level and the computational level. IHMADA has been built around five information processing phases. The five phases represent a deliberate as well as automated or reflexive reasoning structure. This paper outlines some aspects of the computational level of IMAHDA. The computational level is derived ...


A Method of Group Decision Task Structuring

Jingle Sun; Pengzhu Zhang; Hui Deng 2007 International Conference on Wireless Communications, Networking and Mobile Computing, 2007

Many decision tasks faced by organizations are too complex to be accomplished by the rugged individualist. Therefore, groups are formed to make the most of important decisions in organizations. But decision-making groups that have often suffered the grinding drudgery of meetings-without-end know how unproductive to deal with their tasks. Having firstly differentiated decision task structuring for group decision makers from ...


Development of a meta-blackboard shell

Cheng-Seen Ho [1990] Proceedings of the 2nd International IEEE Conference on Tools for Artificial Intelligence, 1990

The architecture of a meta-blackboard shell is described, which can be specialized as specific blackboard shells to fit specific domains. The knowledge source structure of the shell is designed as a miniature blackboard architecture to increase the local inference capability through the generalization of knowledge representation. The control component is designed as a restricted blackboard architecture to propose a generalized ...


More Xplore Articles

Educational Resources on Problem-solving

Back to Top

eLearning

Agents for distributed decision-making

S. Talukdar 2003 IEEE Power Engineering Society General Meeting (IEEE Cat. No.03CH37491), 2003

Agents are modules from which problem solving can be built. Structurally, an agent is a bundle of sensors, decision-makers and actuators; behaviorally, an agent is a mapping from an in-space (all the things the agent can sense) to an out-space (all things the agent can affect). Agents can be simple or compound. More specifically, lesser agents can be organized into ...


The design process: properties, paradigms, and structure

D. Braha; O. Maimon IEEE Transactions on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics - Part A: Systems and Humans, 1997

In this paper, we examine the logic and methodology of engineering design from the perspective of the philosophy of science. The fundamental characteristics of design problems and design processes are discussed and analyzed. These characteristics establish the framework within which different design paradigms are examined. Following the discussions on descriptive properties of design, and the prescriptive role of design paradigms, ...


Intelligent hybrid multi-agent computational architecture for complex systems

R. Khosla 1997 IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics. Computational Cybernetics and Simulation, 1997

Intelligent Multi-Agent Hybrid Distributed Architecture (IMAHDA) for complex systems has been defined at the task structure level and the computational level. IHMADA has been built around five information processing phases. The five phases represent a deliberate as well as automated or reflexive reasoning structure. This paper outlines some aspects of the computational level of IMAHDA. The computational level is derived ...


A Method of Group Decision Task Structuring

Jingle Sun; Pengzhu Zhang; Hui Deng 2007 International Conference on Wireless Communications, Networking and Mobile Computing, 2007

Many decision tasks faced by organizations are too complex to be accomplished by the rugged individualist. Therefore, groups are formed to make the most of important decisions in organizations. But decision-making groups that have often suffered the grinding drudgery of meetings-without-end know how unproductive to deal with their tasks. Having firstly differentiated decision task structuring for group decision makers from ...


Development of a meta-blackboard shell

Cheng-Seen Ho [1990] Proceedings of the 2nd International IEEE Conference on Tools for Artificial Intelligence, 1990

The architecture of a meta-blackboard shell is described, which can be specialized as specific blackboard shells to fit specific domains. The knowledge source structure of the shell is designed as a miniature blackboard architecture to increase the local inference capability through the generalization of knowledge representation. The control component is designed as a restricted blackboard architecture to propose a generalized ...


More eLearning Resources

IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Writers as Total Desktop Publishers: Developing a Conceptual Approach to Training

    This chapter explores a conceptually-based answer to the question of training total desktop publishers, focusing initial attention on the training of writers. It argues for developing a conceptual approach to training new users of desktop publishing and identifies some fundamental components that are related both to the process of publishing and to the quality of the document produced -- computer technology skills, problem-solving process skills, verbal skills, visual skills, and visual and verbal integration skills. The chapter then reports an observation of five writers learning to use desktop publishing and finds that the writers share problems with the computer technology, the visual skills, and the integration of the visual and verbal elements of a document. A discussion of developing conceptually-based training for desktop publishers closes the chapter.

  • Index

    Like Mooki, the hero of Spike Lee's film "Do the Right Thing," artificially intelligent systems have a hard time knowing what to do in all circumstances. Classical theories of perfect rationality prescribe the "right thing" for any occasion, but no finite agent can compute their prescriptions fast enough. In Do the Right Thing, the authors argue that a new theoretical foundation for artificial intelligence can be constructed in which rationality is a property of "programs" within a finite architecture, and their behavior over time in the task environment, rather than a property of individual decisions.Do the Right Thing suggests that the rich structure that seems to be exhibited by humans, and ought to be exhibited by AI systems, is a necessary result of the pressure for optimal behavior operating within a system of strictly limited resources. It provides an outline for the design of new intelligent systems and describes theoretical and practical tools for bringing about intelligent behavior in finite machines. The tools are applied to game planning and realtime problem solving, with surprising results.Stuart Russell is Associate Professor of Computer Science at the University of California, Berkeley. This book builds on important philosophical and technical work by his coauthor, the late Eric Wefald.

  • Chess Programs and Other Tools

    When we play the ancient and noble game of chess, we grapple with ideas about honesty, deceitfulness, bravery, fear, aggression, beauty, and creativity, which echo (or allow us to depart from) the attitudes we take in our daily lives. Chess is an activity in which we deploy almost all our available cognitive resources; therefore, it makes an ideal laboratory for investigation into the workings of the mind. Indeed, research into artificial intelligence (AI) has used chess as a model for intelligent behavior since the 1950s. In Chess Metaphors, Diego Rasskin-Gutman explores fundamental questions about memory, thought, emotion, consciousness, and other cognitive processes through the game of chess, using the moves of thirty-two pieces over sixty-four squares to map the structural and functional organization of the brain. Rasskin-Gutman focuses on the cognitive task of problem solving, exploring it from the perspectives of both biology and AI. Examining AI researchers' efforts to program a computer that could beat a flesh-and-blood grandmaster (and win a world chess championship), he finds that the results fall short when compared to the truly creative nature of the human mind.

  • Back Matter

    Like Mooki, the hero of Spike Lee's film "Do the Right Thing," artificially intelligent systems have a hard time knowing what to do in all circumstances. Classical theories of perfect rationality prescribe the "right thing" for any occasion, but no finite agent can compute their prescriptions fast enough. In Do the Right Thing, the authors argue that a new theoretical foundation for artificial intelligence can be constructed in which rationality is a property of "programs" within a finite architecture, and their behavior over time in the task environment, rather than a property of individual decisions.Do the Right Thing suggests that the rich structure that seems to be exhibited by humans, and ought to be exhibited by AI systems, is a necessary result of the pressure for optimal behavior operating within a system of strictly limited resources. It provides an outline for the design of new intelligent systems and describes theoretical and practical tools for bringing about intelligent behavior in finite machines. The tools are applied to game planning and realtime problem solving, with surprising results.Stuart Russell is Associate Professor of Computer Science at the University of California, Berkeley. This book builds on important philosophical and technical work by his coauthor, the late Eric Wefald.

  • Problem Solving, Creativity, and Design

    This part contains chapters titled: Chapter 10: Problem Solving Chapter 11: Creativity Chapter 12: Design

  • The Human Mind: Metaphor of the World

    This chapter contains sections titled: Mind-Brain Duality, Emergent Complexity, Three Levels of Abstraction and Two Operational Spaces, Proprioception, Perception and Knowledge, Memory and Learning, The Magical Number Seven (Plus or Minus Two), Attention, Thought, Decision Making and Problem Solving, Language, Emotions, Consciousness and Qualia, Intelligence, Born or Made? Genetics or Learning, Summary

  • Appendixes G: Internet RFCs

    "This comprehensive book, which provides a succinct-as-possible glossary of the plethora of terms commonly used in communications, is destined to become an indispensable desk-side reference for engineers and others working in the area." - Curtis Siller, Lucent Technologies Are you sometimes overwhelmed by the overabundance of jargon encountered in technical books and articles? Hargrave's Communications Dictionary is a treasure of simplified communications terms, definitions, acronyms, charts, equations, and a wealth of related information amassed over the author's extensive engineering career. From ATM to Zone Paging, this volume includes over ten thousand definitions of key phrases that readers in industry, government, and academia need to understand. Many definitions incorporate basic tools for problem solving not found in other publications-such as drawings, graphs, charts, and references to IEEE standards. Real-world examples associated with voice and data communications are also included, as well as terminology from peripheral disciplines, including optics, computer science, data networks, and the Internet. Hargrave's Communications Dictionary is a fundamental resource for basic to intermediate-level students and practitioners, and is an essential quick reference for more experienced electronic technicians and engineers. This comprehensive dictionary is also an invaluable text for technical schools and universities. About the Author Frank Hargrave has more than 30 years experience in engineering and manufacturing at several major companies, including Multitech, Inc., ITT, and Yale Security, Inc. He is published in a variety of topics, including active filter design, residential telemetry systems, thermal compensation methods in electronic circuits, and telephone line interface methods. Mr. Hargrave currently runs his own consulting business in Charlotte, NC, where he also teaches classes at the Electronic Computer & Programming Institute. He has been issued 12 U.S. patents and has several others disclosed and in process.

  • Internet Sites for Playing Chess

    When we play the ancient and noble game of chess, we grapple with ideas about honesty, deceitfulness, bravery, fear, aggression, beauty, and creativity, which echo (or allow us to depart from) the attitudes we take in our daily lives. Chess is an activity in which we deploy almost all our available cognitive resources; therefore, it makes an ideal laboratory for investigation into the workings of the mind. Indeed, research into artificial intelligence (AI) has used chess as a model for intelligent behavior since the 1950s. In Chess Metaphors, Diego Rasskin-Gutman explores fundamental questions about memory, thought, emotion, consciousness, and other cognitive processes through the game of chess, using the moves of thirty-two pieces over sixty-four squares to map the structural and functional organization of the brain. Rasskin-Gutman focuses on the cognitive task of problem solving, exploring it from the perspectives of both biology and AI. Examining AI researchers' efforts to program a computer that could beat a flesh-and-blood grandmaster (and win a world chess championship), he finds that the results fall short when compared to the truly creative nature of the human mind.

  • Human Development

    Given the importance of human development after adolescence, it is perhaps surprising that little attention has been paid to this aspect in design for learning in higher education. It may be equally surprising that among the few exceptions that prove the rule are schools in engineering. The Colorado School of Mines and those responsible for the problem-solving course at McMaster University have taken particular notice of the Perry model of student development in college (Perry, 1970). This model was derived from studies of students at Harvard University. This theory is in the same vein as a theory that Piaget proposed for development from birth to adolescence. It proposes that college students go through a series of stages until they are able to cope with the world of relativism they find about them while at the same time maintaining commitment to a developed point of view. When students arrive at university the students seek black and white answers from teachers who are seen as the authority figures. Much teaching reinforces this mode of thinking and does not help students break away from this world into one where they can think for themselves. For one reason and another it seems that many students do not go beyond the middle step of this developmental process, at least in so far as it is observed in college. The models proposed by those who use this scheme to design curricula expose students to a variety of learning procedures in which the students can move from a dependence on teachers to using them as consultants. Gains have been reported in student development in those schools running models based on this or other programs where such development is thought to be important. Perry argued that growth occurred in spurts and Culver and Sackman (1988) described these growth experiences as marker events. They argued that learning activities that have a high level of mar ker potential will involve the learner in activity based learning. If one wants to be an engineer, one has to behave as engineer and opportunities have to be provided for this to happen. Others have come to the same conclusion. Problems in the evaluation of curriculum designed on the basis of this model are discussed. A similar approach to Perry's theory has been developed by King and Kitchener (1994). Some have argued that their model does not differ from Perry's. While acknowledging their debt to Perry they take a different view. It seems that there is difference between the two models in the final stages. In the King and Kitchener model growth is centerd on the development of reflective judgment hence, reflective practice. Irrespective of its validity, their work is particularly attractive to teachers because it relates the stages to instructional goals that can easily be translated into outcomes that would receive the assent of teachers. While there is now a considerable body of research on adult human development, there has also been a substantial body of research on adult learning that is relevant to engineering education. This is discussed. It is pointed out that in order to make use of these theories many teachers will have to change their beliefs about teaching and learning. That is, from transmitters of information to facilitators or managers of learning. Recently, engineering educators have begun to take notice of emotional (social) intelligence. They have argued that given its importance in the workplace, engineering schools have an obligation to provide for its development. A problem with the concept is that it embraces a multitude of dimensions. It is not a single unitary concept. Nevertheless, a considerable case may be made for training in these dimensions in engineering schools. A considerable report could be made on motivation. However, this Chapter ends with a section on this topic that is confined to the little substance that has been written on the subject in the engineering education literature.

  • Natural Language Undeastanding and Intelligent Computer Coaches

    This chapter contains sections titled: Section Contents, Natural Language Understanding has an Esteemed History, Representation and Frames, Intelligent Computer Coaches



Standards related to Problem-solving

Back to Top

No standards are currently tagged "Problem-solving"


Jobs related to Problem-solving

Back to Top