North Pole

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The North Pole, also known as the Geographic North Pole or Terrestrial North Pole, is, subject to the caveats explained below, defined as the point in the northern hemisphere where the Earth's axis of rotation meets its surface. It should not be confused with the North Magnetic Pole. The North Pole is the northernmost point on Earth, lying diametrically opposite the South Pole. It defines geodetic latitude 90° North, as well as the direction of True North. (Wikipedia.org)




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2012 IEEE/OES Baltic International Symposium (BALTIC)

Discuss & Exchange Information In Support Of Climate Change Research & Ocean Observation Systems To Ensure Sustainable Development



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Industry Applications, IEEE Transactions on

The development and application of electric systems, apparatus, devices, and controls to the processes and equipment of industry and commerce; the promotion of safe, reliable, and economic installations; the encouragement of energy conservation; the creation of voluntary engineering standards and recommended practices.


Power Systems, IEEE Transactions on

Requirements, planning, analysis, reliability, operation, and economics of electrical generating, transmission, and distribution systems for industrial, commercial, public, and domestic consumption.


Spectrum, IEEE

IEEE Spectrum Magazine, the flagship publication of the IEEE, explores the development, applications and implications of new technologies. It anticipates trends in engineering, science, and technology, and provides a forum for understanding, discussion and leadership in these areas. IEEE Spectrum is the world's leading engineering and scientific magazine. Read by over 300,000 engineers worldwide, Spectrum provides international coverage of all ...




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Results of high latitude trials of modern marine compasses

A. G. Andreev; V. S. Ermakov; M. B. Mafter; V. I. Kokorin; C. V. Rumiancev IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine, 2005

This paper presents the results of the trials of master compasses: Vega-M, Geus-M, Meridian, and satellite compass MRK-11 received in the course of three cruises to the North Pole of the atomic ice-breaker "Yamal" in the summer of 2003. Methods of gyrocompass accuracy evaluation and some practical recommendations useful for operation in polar waters are given.


Foreword by the Associate Editor [Historical Corner]

Giuseppe Pelosi IEEE Antennas and Propagation Magazine, 2010

Presents the editorial for this issue of the publication.


`Excellence against all odds'-Canada's electric utilities triumph over distance, topography and weather

W. S. Read Proceedings of the 1990 IEEE Colloquium in South America, 1990

Canada is the second largest country in the world in terms of geographical boundaries. Located between latitude 49° north and the North Pole, Canada stretches from east to west, across 5 1/2 time zones, a distance of 7500 kilometers. These tremendous distances and the variations in topography and weather have provided a formidable challenge for Canadian electric power utilities as ...


High Latitude Trials of Modern Russian Marine Compasses

A. G. Andreev; V. C. Ermakov; M. B. Mafter; V. I. Kokorin; C. V. Rumyantsev 2006 IEEE/ION Position, Location, And Navigation Symposium, 2006

First Page of the Article ![](/xploreAssets/images/absImages/01650655.png)


Voyage of the FRAM

C. E. Woody OCEANS '97. MTS/IEEE Conference Proceedings, 1997

Fridtjof Nansen was the first person to put forth the idea of Arctic circulation and to truly discover the Arctic Ocean basin. He based his hypothesis on the ill-fated ship JEANNETTE that was crushed by the ice in 1881 near the New Siberian Islands. The JEANETTE, in trying to find a passage to the North Pole, entered the Bering Strait ...


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eLearning

Results of high latitude trials of modern marine compasses

A. G. Andreev; V. S. Ermakov; M. B. Mafter; V. I. Kokorin; C. V. Rumiancev IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine, 2005

This paper presents the results of the trials of master compasses: Vega-M, Geus-M, Meridian, and satellite compass MRK-11 received in the course of three cruises to the North Pole of the atomic ice-breaker "Yamal" in the summer of 2003. Methods of gyrocompass accuracy evaluation and some practical recommendations useful for operation in polar waters are given.


Foreword by the Associate Editor [Historical Corner]

Giuseppe Pelosi IEEE Antennas and Propagation Magazine, 2010

Presents the editorial for this issue of the publication.


`Excellence against all odds'-Canada's electric utilities triumph over distance, topography and weather

W. S. Read Proceedings of the 1990 IEEE Colloquium in South America, 1990

Canada is the second largest country in the world in terms of geographical boundaries. Located between latitude 49° north and the North Pole, Canada stretches from east to west, across 5 1/2 time zones, a distance of 7500 kilometers. These tremendous distances and the variations in topography and weather have provided a formidable challenge for Canadian electric power utilities as ...


High Latitude Trials of Modern Russian Marine Compasses

A. G. Andreev; V. C. Ermakov; M. B. Mafter; V. I. Kokorin; C. V. Rumyantsev 2006 IEEE/ION Position, Location, And Navigation Symposium, 2006

First Page of the Article ![](/xploreAssets/images/absImages/01650655.png)


Voyage of the FRAM

C. E. Woody OCEANS '97. MTS/IEEE Conference Proceedings, 1997

Fridtjof Nansen was the first person to put forth the idea of Arctic circulation and to truly discover the Arctic Ocean basin. He based his hypothesis on the ill-fated ship JEANNETTE that was crushed by the ice in 1881 near the New Siberian Islands. The JEANETTE, in trying to find a passage to the North Pole, entered the Bering Strait ...


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IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Distributed Windings and Rotating Electric Machinery

    This chapter focuses on a complicated winding arrangement known as a distributed winding, which is often used in rotating electric machinery. In these machines, the goal is to establish a continuously rotating set of north and south poles on the stator, which interact with an equal number of north and south poles on the rotor, to produce uniform torque. The winding function has three important uses. First, it is useful in determining the MMF caused by distributed windings. Second, it is used to determine how much flux links a winding. Third, the winding function is instrumental in calculating winding inductances. The chapter talks about the air-gap magnetomotive force (MMF). It explains the calculation of inductances of distributed windings. The problem of the computation of leakage inductance of a stator winding and the problem of finding the resistance of a distributed winding are considered.



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