Microeconomics

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Microeconomics (from Greek prefix micro- meaning "small" + "economics") is a branch of economics that studies the behavior of how the individual modern household and firms make decisions to allocate limited resources. (Wikipedia.org)






Conferences related to Microeconomics

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2013 9th International Conference on Wireless Communications, Networking and Mobile Computing (WiCOM)

All areas related to wireless communications, network technologies, and mobile computing systems.


2013 IEEE International Conference on Data Engineering (ICDE 2013)

The annual IEEE International Conference on Data Engineering (ICDE) addresses research issues in designing, building, managing, and evaluating advanced data-intensive systems and applications. It is a leading forum for researchers, practitioners, developers, and users to explore cutting-edge ideas and to exchange techniques, tools, and experiences.


2013 Joint IFSA World Congress and NAFIPS Annual Meeting (IFSA/NAFIPS)

IFSA-NAFIPS 2013 aims to bring together researchers, engineers and practitioners to present the latest achievements and innovations in the area of fuzzy information processing, to discuss thought-provoking developments and challenges.


2012 IEEE 12th International Conference on Computer and Information Technology (CIT)

CIT 2012 aims to attract research works spanning over the various aspects of information technology, computing science and computer engineering. The works highlight foundational work that strives to push beyond limits of existing computer technologies, including experimental efforts, innovative systems, and investigations that identify weaknesses in existing IT services.

  • 2011 IEEE 11th International Conference on Computer and Information Technology (CIT)

    CIT has become a primary venue for researchers and industry practitioners to discuss open problems, new research directions, and real-world case studies on all aspects of computer and information technology. CIT is soliciting original, previously unpublished and high quality papers addressing research challenges and advances spanning over the multidisciplinary aspects of information technology, computing science and computer engineering.

  • 2010 IEEE 10th International Conference on Computer and Information Technology (CIT)

    CIT has become a major platform for researchers and industry practitioners from different fields of computer and information technology. In previous years, CIT has attracted many high quality research papers spanning over the various aspects of information technology and computer science. CIT also has two co-located IEEE conferences, ICESS 2010 and ScalCom 2010, to see more visit the conference home pages http://www.scim.brad.ac.uk/~ylwu/ICESS2010/ and http://www.scim.brad.ac.uk/~ylwu/S

  • 2009 IEEE 9th International Conference on Computer and Information Technology (CIT)

    As an IEEE CS conference, CIT has become a major platform for researchers and industry practitioners from different fields of computer and information technology. Each year, CIT attendees appreciate and benefit from multidisciplinary exchanges in computer and information technology. In previous years, CIT has attracted many high quality research papers spanning over the various aspects of information technology, computing science and computer engineering. These papers highlight foundational work that strive

  • 2008 IEEE 8th International Conference on Computer and Information Technology (CIT)

    CIT has become a major platform for researchers and industry practitioners from different fields of computer and information technology. It spans over the various aspects of information technology, computing science and computer engineering.

  • 2007 IEEE 7th International Conference on Computer and Information Technology (CIT)

    CIT has become a major platform for researchers and industry practitioners from different fields of computer and information technology. Each year, CIT attendees appreciate and benefit from multidisciplinary exchanges in computer and information technology.

  • 2006 6th International Conference on Computer and Information Technology (CIT)


2012 IEEE International Symposium on Dynamic Spectrum Access Networks (DYSPAN)

a unique symposium that gathers technology, policy and regulatory communities together with contributions dealing with policy and regulation issues on dynamic spectrum access, theoretical studies, algorithm and protocol design for cognitive radios and networks, as well as application-oriented contributions dealing with architectures, platforms, signaling and multiple access schemes



Periodicals related to Microeconomics

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Computers, IEEE Transactions on

Design and analysis of algorithms, computer systems, and digital networks; methods for specifying, measuring, and modeling the performance of computers and computer systems; design of computer components, such as arithmetic units, data storage devices, and interface devices; design of reliable and testable digital devices and systems; computer networks and distributed computer systems; new computer organizations and architectures; applications of VLSI ...


Micro, IEEE

IEEE Micro magazine presents high-quality technical articles from designers, systems integrators, and users discussing the design, performance, or application of microcomputer and microprocessor systems. Topics include architecture, components, subassemblies, operating systems, application software, communications, fault tolerance, instrumentation, control equipment, and peripherals.


Signal Processing Magazine, IEEE

IEEE Signal Processing Magazine is ranked as the number three most-cited journal in Electrical and Electronics Engineering in 2004, according to the annual Journal Citation Report (2004 edition) published by the Institute for Scientific Information. Read more at http://www.ieee.org/products/citations.html. This publication features tutorial style papers on signal processing research and applications. The primary means of communication of the society leadership ...



Most published Xplore authors for Microeconomics

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Xplore Articles related to Microeconomics

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Resource Selection Game with Cost Constraint Oriented to Microeconomic Data Mining

Jin Li; WeiYi Liu; Kun Yue 2009 International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Computational Intelligence, 2009

Game theory, which has provided a powerful tool to describe strategic interaction in economic environment, is a mathematical model of competitions among individual decision makers. In this paper, we present a study on combining game theory and microeconomic data mining by introducing the concept of resource selection game analysis. We present a universal multiple resources selection model, where each resource ...


Personal income tax design system based on microsimulation technology

Wan Xiangyu; Jia Peng 2010 2nd IEEE International Conference on Information Management and Engineering, 2010

The reform of personal income tax system is one of the most important reforms undergoing in modern China and the Chinese government and our society have both paid much attention to this reform. But due to the lack of micro datasets and modeling techniques, accurate quantitative understanding and full system analysis of relevant problems have not been done in China. ...


Systems Analysis for Engineers and Managers

Richard de Neufville; Joseph H. Stafford; Joseph Pistrang IEEE Transactions on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics, 1972

None


Dynamic economic- and QoS-based approach for workflow-oriented distributed services allocation

Jing-fan Tang; Bo Zhou; Zhi-jun He 2004 IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man and Cybernetics (IEEE Cat. No.04CH37583), 2004

With the increasing scale of distributed services in wide-area environment, there are hundreds of thousands of accessible services, which are deployed in heterogeneous, geographically distributed service systems. The processing of services in wide-area environment is also becoming more and more intricate, which promotes the need for linking large-scale distributed computational resources and heterogeneous data resources. The service providers have different ...


Quantifying agent strategies under reputation

S. Marti; H. Garcia-Molina Fifth IEEE International Conference on Peer-to-Peer Computing (P2P'05), 2005

Our research proposes a simple buyer/seller game that captures the incentives dictating the interaction between peers in resource trading peer-to-peer networks. We prove that for simple reputation-based buyer strategies, a seller's decision whether to cheat or not is dependent only on the length of its transaction history, not on the particular actions committed. Given a finite number of transactions, a ...


More Xplore Articles

Educational Resources on Microeconomics

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eLearning

Resource Selection Game with Cost Constraint Oriented to Microeconomic Data Mining

Jin Li; WeiYi Liu; Kun Yue 2009 International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Computational Intelligence, 2009

Game theory, which has provided a powerful tool to describe strategic interaction in economic environment, is a mathematical model of competitions among individual decision makers. In this paper, we present a study on combining game theory and microeconomic data mining by introducing the concept of resource selection game analysis. We present a universal multiple resources selection model, where each resource ...


Personal income tax design system based on microsimulation technology

Wan Xiangyu; Jia Peng 2010 2nd IEEE International Conference on Information Management and Engineering, 2010

The reform of personal income tax system is one of the most important reforms undergoing in modern China and the Chinese government and our society have both paid much attention to this reform. But due to the lack of micro datasets and modeling techniques, accurate quantitative understanding and full system analysis of relevant problems have not been done in China. ...


Systems Analysis for Engineers and Managers

Richard de Neufville; Joseph H. Stafford; Joseph Pistrang IEEE Transactions on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics, 1972

None


Dynamic economic- and QoS-based approach for workflow-oriented distributed services allocation

Jing-fan Tang; Bo Zhou; Zhi-jun He 2004 IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man and Cybernetics (IEEE Cat. No.04CH37583), 2004

With the increasing scale of distributed services in wide-area environment, there are hundreds of thousands of accessible services, which are deployed in heterogeneous, geographically distributed service systems. The processing of services in wide-area environment is also becoming more and more intricate, which promotes the need for linking large-scale distributed computational resources and heterogeneous data resources. The service providers have different ...


Quantifying agent strategies under reputation

S. Marti; H. Garcia-Molina Fifth IEEE International Conference on Peer-to-Peer Computing (P2P'05), 2005

Our research proposes a simple buyer/seller game that captures the incentives dictating the interaction between peers in resource trading peer-to-peer networks. We prove that for simple reputation-based buyer strategies, a seller's decision whether to cheat or not is dependent only on the length of its transaction history, not on the particular actions committed. Given a finite number of transactions, a ...


More eLearning Resources

IEEE.tv Videos

No IEEE.tv Videos are currently tagged "Microeconomics"

IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Protecting the Knowledge Commons

    Knowledge in digital form offers unprecedented access to information through the Internet but at the same time is subject to ever-greater restrictions through intellectual property legislation, overpatenting, licensing, overpricing, and lack of preservation. Looking at knowledge as a commons--as a shared resource--allows us to understand both its limitless possibilities and what threatens it. In Understanding Knowledge as a Commons, experts from a range of disciplines discuss the knowledge commons in the digital era--how to conceptualize it, protect it, and build it.Contributors consider the concept of the commons historically and offer an analytical framework for understanding knowledge as a shared social-ecological system. They look at ways to guard against enclosure of the knowledge commons, considering, among other topics, the role of research libraries, the advantages of making scholarly material available outside the academy, and the problem of disappearing Web pages. They discuss the role of intellectual property in a new knowledge commons, the open access movement (including possible funding models for scholarly publications), the development of associational commons, the application of a free/open source framework to scientific knowledge, and the effect on scholarly communication of collaborative communities within academia, and offer a case study of EconPort, an open access, open source digital library for students and researchers in microeconomics. The essays clarify critical issues that arise within these new types of commons--and offer guideposts for future theory and practice.Contributors:David Bollier, James Boyle, James C. Cox, Shubha Ghosh, Charlotte Hess, Nancy Kranich, Peter Levine, Wendy Pradt Lougee, Elinor Ostrom, Charles Schweik, Peter Suber, J. T odd Swarthout, Donald Waters

  • Building New Knowledge Commons

    Knowledge in digital form offers unprecedented access to information through the Internet but at the same time is subject to ever-greater restrictions through intellectual property legislation, overpatenting, licensing, overpricing, and lack of preservation. Looking at knowledge as a commons--as a shared resource--allows us to understand both its limitless possibilities and what threatens it. In Understanding Knowledge as a Commons, experts from a range of disciplines discuss the knowledge commons in the digital era--how to conceptualize it, protect it, and build it.Contributors consider the concept of the commons historically and offer an analytical framework for understanding knowledge as a shared social-ecological system. They look at ways to guard against enclosure of the knowledge commons, considering, among other topics, the role of research libraries, the advantages of making scholarly material available outside the academy, and the problem of disappearing Web pages. They discuss the role of intellectual property in a new knowledge commons, the open access movement (including possible funding models for scholarly publications), the development of associational commons, the application of a free/open source framework to scientific knowledge, and the effect on scholarly communication of collaborative communities within academia, and offer a case study of EconPort, an open access, open source digital library for students and researchers in microeconomics. The essays clarify critical issues that arise within these new types of commons--and offer guideposts for future theory and practice.Contributors:David Bollier, James Boyle, James C. Cox, Shubha Ghosh, Charlotte Hess, Nancy Kranich, Peter Levine, Wendy Pradt Lougee, Elinor Ostrom, Charles Schweik, Peter Suber, J. T odd Swarthout, Donald Waters

  • Glossary

    Knowledge in digital form offers unprecedented access to information through the Internet but at the same time is subject to ever-greater restrictions through intellectual property legislation, overpatenting, licensing, overpricing, and lack of preservation. Looking at knowledge as a commons--as a shared resource--allows us to understand both its limitless possibilities and what threatens it. In Understanding Knowledge as a Commons, experts from a range of disciplines discuss the knowledge commons in the digital era--how to conceptualize it, protect it, and build it.Contributors consider the concept of the commons historically and offer an analytical framework for understanding knowledge as a shared social-ecological system. They look at ways to guard against enclosure of the knowledge commons, considering, among other topics, the role of research libraries, the advantages of making scholarly material available outside the academy, and the problem of disappearing Web pages. They discuss the role of intellectual property in a new knowledge commons, the open access movement (including possible funding models for scholarly publications), the development of associational commons, the application of a free/open source framework to scientific knowledge, and the effect on scholarly communication of collaborative communities within academia, and offer a case study of EconPort, an open access, open source digital library for students and researchers in microeconomics. The essays clarify critical issues that arise within these new types of commons--and offer guideposts for future theory and practice.Contributors:David Bollier, James Boyle, James C. Cox, Shubha Ghosh, Charlotte Hess, Nancy Kranich, Peter Levine, Wendy Pradt Lougee, Elinor Ostrom, Charles Schweik, Peter Suber, J. T odd Swarthout, Donald Waters

  • Studying the Knowledge Commons

    Knowledge in digital form offers unprecedented access to information through the Internet but at the same time is subject to ever-greater restrictions through intellectual property legislation, overpatenting, licensing, overpricing, and lack of preservation. Looking at knowledge as a commons--as a shared resource--allows us to understand both its limitless possibilities and what threatens it. In Understanding Knowledge as a Commons, experts from a range of disciplines discuss the knowledge commons in the digital era--how to conceptualize it, protect it, and build it.Contributors consider the concept of the commons historically and offer an analytical framework for understanding knowledge as a shared social-ecological system. They look at ways to guard against enclosure of the knowledge commons, considering, among other topics, the role of research libraries, the advantages of making scholarly material available outside the academy, and the problem of disappearing Web pages. They discuss the role of intellectual property in a new knowledge commons, the open access movement (including possible funding models for scholarly publications), the development of associational commons, the application of a free/open source framework to scientific knowledge, and the effect on scholarly communication of collaborative communities within academia, and offer a case study of EconPort, an open access, open source digital library for students and researchers in microeconomics. The essays clarify critical issues that arise within these new types of commons--and offer guideposts for future theory and practice.Contributors:David Bollier, James Boyle, James C. Cox, Shubha Ghosh, Charlotte Hess, Nancy Kranich, Peter Levine, Wendy Pradt Lougee, Elinor Ostrom, Charles Schweik, Peter Suber, J. T odd Swarthout, Donald Waters

  • Index

    Knowledge in digital form offers unprecedented access to information through the Internet but at the same time is subject to ever-greater restrictions through intellectual property legislation, overpatenting, licensing, overpricing, and lack of preservation. Looking at knowledge as a commons--as a shared resource--allows us to understand both its limitless possibilities and what threatens it. In Understanding Knowledge as a Commons, experts from a range of disciplines discuss the knowledge commons in the digital era--how to conceptualize it, protect it, and build it.Contributors consider the concept of the commons historically and offer an analytical framework for understanding knowledge as a shared social-ecological system. They look at ways to guard against enclosure of the knowledge commons, considering, among other topics, the role of research libraries, the advantages of making scholarly material available outside the academy, and the problem of disappearing Web pages. They discuss the role of intellectual property in a new knowledge commons, the open access movement (including possible funding models for scholarly publications), the development of associational commons, the application of a free/open source framework to scientific knowledge, and the effect on scholarly communication of collaborative communities within academia, and offer a case study of EconPort, an open access, open source digital library for students and researchers in microeconomics. The essays clarify critical issues that arise within these new types of commons--and offer guideposts for future theory and practice.Contributors:David Bollier, James Boyle, James C. Cox, Shubha Ghosh, Charlotte Hess, Nancy Kranich, Peter Levine, Wendy Pradt Lougee, Elinor Ostrom, Charles Schweik, Peter Suber, J. T odd Swarthout, Donald Waters

  • EconPort: Creating and Maintaining a Knowledge Commons

    This chapter contains sections titled: Microeconomics and Experiments, Microeconomics Experiments as a Teaching Method, Experimental Economics Laboratories as Information Facilities, Historical Development of Experimental Economics Laboratories, Challenges in Creating an Economics Common Resource, EconPort: A Digital Library for Microeconomics Education, EconPort as a (Globally Consumable) Local Public Good, EconPort as an Associational Knowledge Commons, Sustainability: Fostering a User Community and Workshop Dissemination, Conclusion, References

  • Gamification and Economics

    This chapter contains sections titled: A Brief Look at the Microeconomics of Gamification, Behavioral Economics, Gamification from the Perspective of Marketing, Discussion: Positioning Gamification, Notes, References

  • No title

    Today's wireless communications and networking practices are tightly coupled with economic considerations, to the extent that it is almost impossible to make a sound technology choice without understanding the corresponding economic implications. This book aims at providing a foundational introduction on how microeconomics, and pricing theory in particular, can help us to understand and build better wireless networks. The book can be used as lecture notes for a course in the field of network economics, or a reference book for wireless engineers and applied economists to understand how pricing mechanisms influence the fast growing modern wireless industry. This book first covers the basics of wireless communication technologies and microeconomics, before going in-depth about several pricing models and their wireless applications. The pricing models include social optimal pricing, monopoly pricing, price differentiation, oligopoly pricing, and network externalities, supported by introd ctory discussions of convex optimization and game theory. The wireless applications include wireless video streaming, service provider competitions, cellular usage-based pricing, network partial price differentiation, wireless spectrum leasing, distributed power control, and cellular technology upgrade. More information related to the book (including references, slides, and videos) can be found at ncel.ie.cuhk.edu.hk/content/wireless-network-pricing.

  • Speculative Microeconomics for Tomorrow's Economy

    This chapter contains sections titled: 1. The Utility of the Market, 2. "Technological" Prerequisites of the Market Economy, 3. Out on the Cybernetic Frontier, 4. The Next Economics?, Acknowledgments, Notes



Standards related to Microeconomics

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Jobs related to Microeconomics

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