Conferences related to Keyboards

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2012 16th Annual International Symposium on Wearable Computers (ISWC)

ISWC 2012, the sixteenth annual International Symposium on Wearable Computers, is the premier forum for wearable computing and issues related to on-body and worn mobile technologies. ISWC'12 will bring together researchers, product vendors, fashion designers, textile manufacturers, users, and related professionals to share information and advances in wearable computing.


2012 IEEE 16th International Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work in Design (CSCWD)

Collaboration technologies and applications to the design of processes, products, systems, and services in industries and societies. Application domains include aerospace, automotive, manufacturing, logistics, transportation, power and energy, healthcare, infrastructure, administration, social networks, and entertainment.


2009 Fifth International Conference on Autonomic and Autonomous Systems (ICAS)

The ICAS 2009 (International Conference on Autonomic and Autonomous Systems) is a multi-track event covering related topics on theory and practice on systems automation, autonomous systems and autonomic computing.


2009 International Conference on Information and Communication Technologies and Development (ICTD)

The goal of the ICTD conference is to provide a forum for academic researchers and scholarly practitioners working with Information and Communications Technology (ICT) applied to development. The conference will bring together researchers and reflective practitioners in both the social and technical sciences.



Periodicals related to Keyboards

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Consumer Electronics, IEEE Transactions on

The design and manufacture of consumer electronics products, components, and related activities, particularly those used for entertainment, leisure, and educational purposes


Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Rehabilitation aspects of biomedical engineering, including functional electrical stimulation, acoustic dynamics, human performance measurement and analysis, nerve stimulation, electromyography, motor control and stimulation, and hardware and software applications for rehabilitation engineering and assistive devices.


Pervasive Computing, IEEE

The popularity of mobile Internet access, third- and fourth-generation wireless communication, handheld devices, and Bluetooth have made pervasive computing a reality. To help you keep pace, IEEE Pervasive Computing covers mobile computing, wireless networks, security, scalability, intelligent vehicles and environments, and pervasive computing applications.




Xplore Articles related to Keyboards

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Evaluation of feature sets in the post processing of handwritten Pitman's shorthand

Swe Myo Htwe; C. Higgins; G. Leedham; Ma Yang Ninth International Workshop on Frontiers in Handwriting Recognition, 2004

Innovative ways to rapidly input text becomes essential in today's world of mobile computing. The paper discusses the computer transcription of handwritten Pitman shorthand as a means of rapid text entry to pen-based computers, particularly from the aspect of linguistic post processing. Feature-to-phoneme conversion is introduced as the first stage of a text interpreter and the application of various production ...


Interaction Techniques for Selecting and Manipulating Subgraphs in Network Visualizations

Michael J. McGuffin; Igor Jurisica IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics, 2009

We present a novel and extensible set of interaction techniques for manipulating visualizations of networks by selecting subgraphs and then applying various commands to modify their layout or graphical properties. Our techniques integrate traditional rectangle and lasso selection, and also support selecting a node's neighbourhood by dragging out its radius (in edges) using a novel kind of radial menu. Commands ...


Evaluating tangible paradigms for ground robot teleoperation

Gabriele Randelli; Matteo Venanzi; Daniele Nardi 2011 RO-MAN, 2011

Tangible user interfaces (TUIs) exhibit innovative interaction paradigms, for example through motion sensing, tactile feedback, or gesturing. Whilst wide spread in human-computer interaction, their value in robotic systems has still to be assessed. In this paper, we present some results obtained through an extensive experimental evaluation of motion sensing interaction paradigms implemented on TUIs for the teleoperation of ground robots. ...


A direct-drive hand: design, modeling and control

M. Ebner; R. S. Wallace Proceedings of 1995 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, 1995

An artificial 15 degrees of mobility direct drive hand, slightly bigger than a human hand, is presented. Advantages and limitations of a direct drive hand are given. The authors introduce the design of their hand and present a model for control of the hand. Finally the authors describe their experiments with the hand. The direct drive hand dynamics have been ...


Implementation of the System-on-Chip for virtual keyboard

Kyungjin Byun; Nak-Woong Eum; Gwang-Hui Jeong; Jae-Eul Goo 2012 IEEE 16th International Symposium on Consumer Electronics, 2012

This paper describes the implementation of the SoC (System-on-Chip) for the virtual keyboard system exploiting computer vision technique. The SoC integrates 32-bit RISC and 16-bit DSP processor core, camera interface, and a number of peripheral blocks necessary for the implementation of virtual keyboard system. This paper presents also the finger motion recognition algorithm embedded in the SoC. The SoC is ...


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Educational Resources on Keyboards

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eLearning

Evaluation of feature sets in the post processing of handwritten Pitman's shorthand

Swe Myo Htwe; C. Higgins; G. Leedham; Ma Yang Ninth International Workshop on Frontiers in Handwriting Recognition, 2004

Innovative ways to rapidly input text becomes essential in today's world of mobile computing. The paper discusses the computer transcription of handwritten Pitman shorthand as a means of rapid text entry to pen-based computers, particularly from the aspect of linguistic post processing. Feature-to-phoneme conversion is introduced as the first stage of a text interpreter and the application of various production ...


Interaction Techniques for Selecting and Manipulating Subgraphs in Network Visualizations

Michael J. McGuffin; Igor Jurisica IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics, 2009

We present a novel and extensible set of interaction techniques for manipulating visualizations of networks by selecting subgraphs and then applying various commands to modify their layout or graphical properties. Our techniques integrate traditional rectangle and lasso selection, and also support selecting a node's neighbourhood by dragging out its radius (in edges) using a novel kind of radial menu. Commands ...


Evaluating tangible paradigms for ground robot teleoperation

Gabriele Randelli; Matteo Venanzi; Daniele Nardi 2011 RO-MAN, 2011

Tangible user interfaces (TUIs) exhibit innovative interaction paradigms, for example through motion sensing, tactile feedback, or gesturing. Whilst wide spread in human-computer interaction, their value in robotic systems has still to be assessed. In this paper, we present some results obtained through an extensive experimental evaluation of motion sensing interaction paradigms implemented on TUIs for the teleoperation of ground robots. ...


A direct-drive hand: design, modeling and control

M. Ebner; R. S. Wallace Proceedings of 1995 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, 1995

An artificial 15 degrees of mobility direct drive hand, slightly bigger than a human hand, is presented. Advantages and limitations of a direct drive hand are given. The authors introduce the design of their hand and present a model for control of the hand. Finally the authors describe their experiments with the hand. The direct drive hand dynamics have been ...


Implementation of the System-on-Chip for virtual keyboard

Kyungjin Byun; Nak-Woong Eum; Gwang-Hui Jeong; Jae-Eul Goo 2012 IEEE 16th International Symposium on Consumer Electronics, 2012

This paper describes the implementation of the SoC (System-on-Chip) for the virtual keyboard system exploiting computer vision technique. The SoC integrates 32-bit RISC and 16-bit DSP processor core, camera interface, and a number of peripheral blocks necessary for the implementation of virtual keyboard system. This paper presents also the finger motion recognition algorithm embedded in the SoC. The SoC is ...


More eLearning Resources

IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Bibliography

    We are active with our mobile devices; we play games, watch films, listen to music, check social media, and tap screens and keyboards while we are on the move. In _ Mood and Mobility_, Richard Coyne argues that not only do we communicate, process information, and entertain ourselves through devices and social media; we also receive, modify, intensify, and transmit moods. Designers, practitioners, educators, researchers, and users should pay more attention to the moods created around our smartphones, tablets, and laptops. Drawing on research from a range of disciplines, including experimental psychology, phenomenology, cultural theory, and architecture, Coyne shows that users of social media are not simply passive receivers of moods; they are complicit in making moods. Devoting each chapter to a particular mood -- from curiosity and pleasure to anxiety and melancholy -- Coyne shows that devices and technologies do affect people's moods, although not always directly. He s ows that mood effects are transitional; different moods suit different occasions, and derive character from emotional shifts. Furthermore, moods are active; we enlist all the resources of human sociability to create moods. And finally, the discourse about mood is deeply reflexive; in a kind of meta- moodiness, we talk about our moods and have feelings about them. Mood, in Coyne's distinctive telling, provides a new way to look at the ever-changing world of ubiquitous digital technologies.

  • Solutions to the Problem

    This chapter contains sections titled: When and How to Authenticate Fastwords: Adapting Passwords to Constrained Keyboards Deriving PINs from Passwords Visual Preference Authentication The Deadly Sins of Security User Interfaces SpoofKiller??-??Let's Kiss Spoofing Goodbye! Device Identification and Intelligence How can we Determine if a Device is Infected or not?

  • Epilogue: From Head to World

    We are active with our mobile devices; we play games, watch films, listen to music, check social media, and tap screens and keyboards while we are on the move. In _ Mood and Mobility_, Richard Coyne argues that not only do we communicate, process information, and entertain ourselves through devices and social media; we also receive, modify, intensify, and transmit moods. Designers, practitioners, educators, researchers, and users should pay more attention to the moods created around our smartphones, tablets, and laptops. Drawing on research from a range of disciplines, including experimental psychology, phenomenology, cultural theory, and architecture, Coyne shows that users of social media are not simply passive receivers of moods; they are complicit in making moods. Devoting each chapter to a particular mood -- from curiosity and pleasure to anxiety and melancholy -- Coyne shows that devices and technologies do affect people's moods, although not always directly. He s ows that mood effects are transitional; different moods suit different occasions, and derive character from emotional shifts. Furthermore, moods are active; we enlist all the resources of human sociability to create moods. And finally, the discourse about mood is deeply reflexive; in a kind of meta- moodiness, we talk about our moods and have feelings about them. Mood, in Coyne's distinctive telling, provides a new way to look at the ever-changing world of ubiquitous digital technologies.

  • Index

    We are active with our mobile devices; we play games, watch films, listen to music, check social media, and tap screens and keyboards while we are on the move. In _ Mood and Mobility_, Richard Coyne argues that not only do we communicate, process information, and entertain ourselves through devices and social media; we also receive, modify, intensify, and transmit moods. Designers, practitioners, educators, researchers, and users should pay more attention to the moods created around our smartphones, tablets, and laptops. Drawing on research from a range of disciplines, including experimental psychology, phenomenology, cultural theory, and architecture, Coyne shows that users of social media are not simply passive receivers of moods; they are complicit in making moods. Devoting each chapter to a particular mood -- from curiosity and pleasure to anxiety and melancholy -- Coyne shows that devices and technologies do affect people's moods, although not always directly. He s ows that mood effects are transitional; different moods suit different occasions, and derive character from emotional shifts. Furthermore, moods are active; we enlist all the resources of human sociability to create moods. And finally, the discourse about mood is deeply reflexive; in a kind of meta- moodiness, we talk about our moods and have feelings about them. Mood, in Coyne's distinctive telling, provides a new way to look at the ever-changing world of ubiquitous digital technologies.



Standards related to Keyboards

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No standards are currently tagged "Keyboards"