Conferences related to Keyboards

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2012 16th Annual International Symposium on Wearable Computers (ISWC)

ISWC 2012, the sixteenth annual International Symposium on Wearable Computers, is the premier forum for wearable computing and issues related to on-body and worn mobile technologies. ISWC'12 will bring together researchers, product vendors, fashion designers, textile manufacturers, users, and related professionals to share information and advances in wearable computing.


2012 IEEE 16th International Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work in Design (CSCWD)

Collaboration technologies and applications to the design of processes, products, systems, and services in industries and societies. Application domains include aerospace, automotive, manufacturing, logistics, transportation, power and energy, healthcare, infrastructure, administration, social networks, and entertainment.


2009 Fifth International Conference on Autonomic and Autonomous Systems (ICAS)

The ICAS 2009 (International Conference on Autonomic and Autonomous Systems) is a multi-track event covering related topics on theory and practice on systems automation, autonomous systems and autonomic computing.


2009 International Conference on Information and Communication Technologies and Development (ICTD)

The goal of the ICTD conference is to provide a forum for academic researchers and scholarly practitioners working with Information and Communications Technology (ICT) applied to development. The conference will bring together researchers and reflective practitioners in both the social and technical sciences.


2006 IEEE International Conference on Virtual Environments, Human-Computer Interfaces and Measurement Systems (VECIMS)



Periodicals related to Keyboards

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Consumer Electronics, IEEE Transactions on

The design and manufacture of consumer electronics products, components, and related activities, particularly those used for entertainment, leisure, and educational purposes


Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Rehabilitation aspects of biomedical engineering, including functional electrical stimulation, acoustic dynamics, human performance measurement and analysis, nerve stimulation, electromyography, motor control and stimulation, and hardware and software applications for rehabilitation engineering and assistive devices.


Pervasive Computing, IEEE

The popularity of mobile Internet access, third- and fourth-generation wireless communication, handheld devices, and Bluetooth have made pervasive computing a reality. To help you keep pace, IEEE Pervasive Computing covers mobile computing, wireless networks, security, scalability, intelligent vehicles and environments, and pervasive computing applications.


Visualization and Computer Graphics, IEEE Transactions on

Specific topics include, but are not limited to: a) visualization techniques and methodologies; b) visualization systems and software; c) volume visulaization; d) flow visualization; e) information visualization; f) multivariate visualization; g) modeling and surfaces; h) rendering techniques and methodologies; i) graphics systems and software; j) animation and simulation; k) user interfaces; l) virtual reality; m) visual programming and program visualization; ...




Xplore Articles related to Keyboards

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Information Hiding in RGB Images Using an Improved Matrix Pattern Approach

Amirfarhad Nilizadeh; Wojciech Mazurczyk; Cliff Zou; Gary T. Leavens 2017 IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition Workshops (CVPRW), 2017

In this paper, a novel steganography algorithm based on an improved "Matrix Pattern" (MP) method is presented. In this process, firstly, an RGB image is divided into the non-overlapping square-sized blocks. Next, 95 dynamicsized unique matrix patterns are automatically generated using the 4th and 5th bit layers of the green layer of each block, which are assigned to 95 English ...


Hacked Devices, A New Game Experience, and a Wi-Fi Detector Shirt

Maria Ebling; Mark Corner IEEE Pervasive Computing, 2008

The article covers several hacks for devices, new and old, and a couple of things that should appeal to the hacker tradition: the jDome game and a Wi-Fi detector shirt.


A ubiquitous, personalized computing environment for all: Teleporting in an X Window System Environment

T. Richardson; F. Bennett; G. Mapp; A. Hopper IEEE Personal Communications, 1994

First Page of the Article ![](/xploreAssets/images/absImages/00311827.png)


Human movement performance in relation to path constraint - the law of steering in locomotion

Shumin Zhai; R. Woltjer IEEE Virtual Reality, 2003. Proceedings., 2003

We examine the law of steering - a quantitative model of human movement time in relation to path width and length previously established in hand drawing movement - in a VR locomotion paradigm. Participants drove a simulated vehicle in a virtual environment on paths whose shape and width were manipulated Results showed that the law of steering also applies to ...


Evaluation of classifiers in a pressure and latency-based typing biometric system

Imran M. Khan; Imama; K. M. Ushama; M. Abiniu; Lai Weng Kin; C. P. Lim 2011 4th International Conference on Mechatronics (ICOM), 2011

System authentication in present time relies on validation by some sort of a password or Personal Identification Number (PIN). However, if an intruder discovers this password or PIN, the user's account can be easily compromised. Biometric systems rely on user authentication based on some physical or behavioral attribute. Typing biometrics is a behavioral biometric authentication system that seeks to identify ...


More Xplore Articles

Educational Resources on Keyboards

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eLearning

Information Hiding in RGB Images Using an Improved Matrix Pattern Approach

Amirfarhad Nilizadeh; Wojciech Mazurczyk; Cliff Zou; Gary T. Leavens 2017 IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition Workshops (CVPRW), 2017

In this paper, a novel steganography algorithm based on an improved "Matrix Pattern" (MP) method is presented. In this process, firstly, an RGB image is divided into the non-overlapping square-sized blocks. Next, 95 dynamicsized unique matrix patterns are automatically generated using the 4th and 5th bit layers of the green layer of each block, which are assigned to 95 English ...


Hacked Devices, A New Game Experience, and a Wi-Fi Detector Shirt

Maria Ebling; Mark Corner IEEE Pervasive Computing, 2008

The article covers several hacks for devices, new and old, and a couple of things that should appeal to the hacker tradition: the jDome game and a Wi-Fi detector shirt.


A ubiquitous, personalized computing environment for all: Teleporting in an X Window System Environment

T. Richardson; F. Bennett; G. Mapp; A. Hopper IEEE Personal Communications, 1994

First Page of the Article ![](/xploreAssets/images/absImages/00311827.png)


Human movement performance in relation to path constraint - the law of steering in locomotion

Shumin Zhai; R. Woltjer IEEE Virtual Reality, 2003. Proceedings., 2003

We examine the law of steering - a quantitative model of human movement time in relation to path width and length previously established in hand drawing movement - in a VR locomotion paradigm. Participants drove a simulated vehicle in a virtual environment on paths whose shape and width were manipulated Results showed that the law of steering also applies to ...


Evaluation of classifiers in a pressure and latency-based typing biometric system

Imran M. Khan; Imama; K. M. Ushama; M. Abiniu; Lai Weng Kin; C. P. Lim 2011 4th International Conference on Mechatronics (ICOM), 2011

System authentication in present time relies on validation by some sort of a password or Personal Identification Number (PIN). However, if an intruder discovers this password or PIN, the user's account can be easily compromised. Biometric systems rely on user authentication based on some physical or behavioral attribute. Typing biometrics is a behavioral biometric authentication system that seeks to identify ...


More eLearning Resources

IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Index

    We are active with our mobile devices; we play games, watch films, listen to music, check social media, and tap screens and keyboards while we are on the move. In _ Mood and Mobility_, Richard Coyne argues that not only do we communicate, process information, and entertain ourselves through devices and social media; we also receive, modify, intensify, and transmit moods. Designers, practitioners, educators, researchers, and users should pay more attention to the moods created around our smartphones, tablets, and laptops. Drawing on research from a range of disciplines, including experimental psychology, phenomenology, cultural theory, and architecture, Coyne shows that users of social media are not simply passive receivers of moods; they are complicit in making moods. Devoting each chapter to a particular mood -- from curiosity and pleasure to anxiety and melancholy -- Coyne shows that devices and technologies do affect people's moods, although not always directly. He s ows that mood effects are transitional; different moods suit different occasions, and derive character from emotional shifts. Furthermore, moods are active; we enlist all the resources of human sociability to create moods. And finally, the discourse about mood is deeply reflexive; in a kind of meta- moodiness, we talk about our moods and have feelings about them. Mood, in Coyne's distinctive telling, provides a new way to look at the ever-changing world of ubiquitous digital technologies.

  • Epilogue: From Head to World

    We are active with our mobile devices; we play games, watch films, listen to music, check social media, and tap screens and keyboards while we are on the move. In _ Mood and Mobility_, Richard Coyne argues that not only do we communicate, process information, and entertain ourselves through devices and social media; we also receive, modify, intensify, and transmit moods. Designers, practitioners, educators, researchers, and users should pay more attention to the moods created around our smartphones, tablets, and laptops. Drawing on research from a range of disciplines, including experimental psychology, phenomenology, cultural theory, and architecture, Coyne shows that users of social media are not simply passive receivers of moods; they are complicit in making moods. Devoting each chapter to a particular mood -- from curiosity and pleasure to anxiety and melancholy -- Coyne shows that devices and technologies do affect people's moods, although not always directly. He s ows that mood effects are transitional; different moods suit different occasions, and derive character from emotional shifts. Furthermore, moods are active; we enlist all the resources of human sociability to create moods. And finally, the discourse about mood is deeply reflexive; in a kind of meta- moodiness, we talk about our moods and have feelings about them. Mood, in Coyne's distinctive telling, provides a new way to look at the ever-changing world of ubiquitous digital technologies.

  • Solutions to the Problem

    This chapter contains sections titled: When and How to Authenticate Fastwords: Adapting Passwords to Constrained Keyboards Deriving PINs from Passwords Visual Preference Authentication The Deadly Sins of Security User Interfaces SpoofKiller??-??Let's Kiss Spoofing Goodbye! Device Identification and Intelligence How can we Determine if a Device is Infected or not?

  • Bibliography

    We are active with our mobile devices; we play games, watch films, listen to music, check social media, and tap screens and keyboards while we are on the move. In _ Mood and Mobility_, Richard Coyne argues that not only do we communicate, process information, and entertain ourselves through devices and social media; we also receive, modify, intensify, and transmit moods. Designers, practitioners, educators, researchers, and users should pay more attention to the moods created around our smartphones, tablets, and laptops. Drawing on research from a range of disciplines, including experimental psychology, phenomenology, cultural theory, and architecture, Coyne shows that users of social media are not simply passive receivers of moods; they are complicit in making moods. Devoting each chapter to a particular mood -- from curiosity and pleasure to anxiety and melancholy -- Coyne shows that devices and technologies do affect people's moods, although not always directly. He s ows that mood effects are transitional; different moods suit different occasions, and derive character from emotional shifts. Furthermore, moods are active; we enlist all the resources of human sociability to create moods. And finally, the discourse about mood is deeply reflexive; in a kind of meta- moodiness, we talk about our moods and have feelings about them. Mood, in Coyne's distinctive telling, provides a new way to look at the ever-changing world of ubiquitous digital technologies.



Standards related to Keyboards

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No standards are currently tagged "Keyboards"