Conferences related to Insects

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IGARSS 2015 - 2015 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium

The Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society (GRSS) seeks to advance science and technology in geoscience, remote sensing and related fields using conferences, education and other resources. Its fields of interest are the theory, concepts and techniques of science and engineering as they apply to the remote sensing of the earth, oceans, atmosphere, and space, as well as the processing, interpretation and dissemination of this information.


2014 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS 2014)

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  • 2013 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS 2013)

    Papers are solicited in all related areas in robotics and intelligent systems. Proposals for tutorials and workshops, as well as organized/special sessions are also welcome to address the emerging areas and innovative applications of new technologies.

  • 2012 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS 2012)

    The 2012 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS 2012) will be held in Vilamoura-Algarve, Portugal, during October 7-11, 2012. The theme of the conference will be Robotics for Quality of Life and Sustainable Development. Papers are solicited in all related areas in robotics and intelligent systems. Proposals for tutorials and workshops, as well as organized/special sessions are also welcome to address the emerging areas and innovative applications of new technologies.

  • 2011 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS 2011)

    The 2011 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS 2011) will be held in San Francisco, California, USA, during September 25-30, 2011. The theme of the conference will be Human- Centered Robotics, and its format will feature innovations in the form of interactive multimedia presentations and special-topic symposia celebrating 50 years of robotics.

  • 2010 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS 2010)

    Papers are solicited in all related areas in robotics and intelligent systems. Proposals and tutorials and workshops, as well as organized/special sessions are also welcome to address the emerging areas and innovative applications of new technologies.


2011 5th International Conference on Recent Advances in Space Technologies (RAST)

RAST 2011 has the general objective of providing a forum for the presentation of recent developments in space technologies. Furthermore and in particular, the organizers wish to make RAST 2011 a special event for looking into the future of space technology developments.


2010 2nd International Asia Conference on Informatics in Control, Automation and Robotics (CAR 2010)

The purpose of the 2010 2nd International Asia Conference on Informatics in Control, Automation and Robotics (CAR 2010) is to bring together researchers, engineers and practitioners interested in the application of informatics to Control, Automation and Robotics.


2010 International Conference on Electrical and Control Engineering (ICECE)

recent advances, new techniques and applications in the field of Electrical Engineering and Automation Control.


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Periodicals related to Insects

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Plasma Science, IEEE Transactions on

Plasma science and engineering, including: magnetofluid dynamics and thermionics; plasma dynamics; gaseous electronics and arc technology; controlled thermonuclear fusion; electron, ion, and plasma sources; space plasmas; high-current relativistic electron beams; laser-plasma interactions; diagnostics; plasma chemistry and colloidal and solid-state plasmas.


Proceedings of the IEEE

The most highly-cited general interest journal in electrical engineering and computer science, the Proceedings is the best way to stay informed on an exemplary range of topics. This journal also holds the distinction of having the longest useful archival life of any EE or computer related journal in the world! Since 1913, the Proceedings of the IEEE has been the ...


Robotics & Automation Magazine, IEEE

It will build upon the existing newsletter base by adding high quality technical articles in the areas of: applied research, state of the shelf solutions and technologies, and education. Articles will be targeted toward the practicing engineer. Creative solutions to real-world problems will be emphasized. Implementation details will be highlighted. Tutorials will provide the technical and historical knowledge required to ...


Robotics, IEEE Transactions on

Publishes fundamental papers on all aspects of Robotics, featuring interdisciplinary approaches from computer science, control systems, electrical engineering, mathematics, mechanical engineering, and other fields. Robots and intelligent machines and systems are critical in areas such as industrial applications; service and personal assistants; surgical operations; space, underwater, and remote exploration; entertainment; safety, search, and rescue; military applications; agriculture applications; and intelligent ...




Xplore Articles related to Insects

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Using aggregate motion in multi-agent teams to solve search and transport problems

A. Rodriguez; J. A. Reggia Proceedings 2005 IEEE Swarm Intelligence Symposium, 2005. SIS 2005., 2005

The aggregate movement of animals has inspired computational models that have proven useful for controlling navigation in teams of mobile agents. Additionally, strategies adopted from social insects have been employed in a multitude of problems to perform distributed problem solving. In this work, we combine collective movements with general problem solving capabilities to build multi-agent teams that perform search and ...


Collective decision-making by a group of cockroach-like robots

S. Garnier; C. Jost; R. Jeanson; J. Gautrais; M. Asadpour; G. Caprari; G. Theraulaz Proceedings 2005 IEEE Swarm Intelligence Symposium, 2005. SIS 2005., 2005

In group-living animals, aggregation favours interactions as well as information exchanges between individuals, and allows thus the emergence of complex collective behaviors. In previous works, a model of a self-enhanced aggregation was deduced from experiments with the cockroach Blattella germanica. In this work, this model was implemented in micro-robots Alice and successfully reproduced the aggregation dynamics observed in a group ...


Ant inspired server population management in a service based computing environment

M. D. Peysakhov; W. C. Regli Proceedings 2005 IEEE Swarm Intelligence Symposium, 2005. SIS 2005., 2005

This paper presents an approach, experiments and a practical application to balancing service availability for a multi-agent system deployed on a wireless mobile ad hoc network. Finding the optimal number of services required to achieve the desired effect is a difficult and problem-specific task. We propose an approach inspired by the quorum sensing behavior of the leptothorax albipennis ants. Similar ...


Using planar parallax to estimate the time-to-contact

M. I. A. Lourakis; S. C. Orphanoudakis Proceedings. 1999 IEEE Computer Society Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (Cat. No PR00149), 1999

To avoid collisions, mobile robots need a measure for assessing the proximity of obstacles. A measure that is well suited to this purpose is provided by the time-to-contact. In this paper, a novel method for estimating the time-to- contact is presented. The method is based on the assumption that the robot is moving on a locally planar ground, parts of ...


Threshold-based algorithms for power-aware load balancing in sensor networks

C. M. Cianci; V. Trifa; A. Martinoli Proceedings 2005 IEEE Swarm Intelligence Symposium, 2005. SIS 2005., 2005

Given the rigid energetic constraints under which a sensor network must operate, efficient means of power management are vital to the success of any sensor network deployment, particularly those in rapidly changing environments. Threshold-based algorithms provide a possible in-network method for adaptive distributed control of energy consumption.


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Educational Resources on Insects

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eLearning

Using aggregate motion in multi-agent teams to solve search and transport problems

A. Rodriguez; J. A. Reggia Proceedings 2005 IEEE Swarm Intelligence Symposium, 2005. SIS 2005., 2005

The aggregate movement of animals has inspired computational models that have proven useful for controlling navigation in teams of mobile agents. Additionally, strategies adopted from social insects have been employed in a multitude of problems to perform distributed problem solving. In this work, we combine collective movements with general problem solving capabilities to build multi-agent teams that perform search and ...


Collective decision-making by a group of cockroach-like robots

S. Garnier; C. Jost; R. Jeanson; J. Gautrais; M. Asadpour; G. Caprari; G. Theraulaz Proceedings 2005 IEEE Swarm Intelligence Symposium, 2005. SIS 2005., 2005

In group-living animals, aggregation favours interactions as well as information exchanges between individuals, and allows thus the emergence of complex collective behaviors. In previous works, a model of a self-enhanced aggregation was deduced from experiments with the cockroach Blattella germanica. In this work, this model was implemented in micro-robots Alice and successfully reproduced the aggregation dynamics observed in a group ...


Ant inspired server population management in a service based computing environment

M. D. Peysakhov; W. C. Regli Proceedings 2005 IEEE Swarm Intelligence Symposium, 2005. SIS 2005., 2005

This paper presents an approach, experiments and a practical application to balancing service availability for a multi-agent system deployed on a wireless mobile ad hoc network. Finding the optimal number of services required to achieve the desired effect is a difficult and problem-specific task. We propose an approach inspired by the quorum sensing behavior of the leptothorax albipennis ants. Similar ...


Using planar parallax to estimate the time-to-contact

M. I. A. Lourakis; S. C. Orphanoudakis Proceedings. 1999 IEEE Computer Society Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (Cat. No PR00149), 1999

To avoid collisions, mobile robots need a measure for assessing the proximity of obstacles. A measure that is well suited to this purpose is provided by the time-to-contact. In this paper, a novel method for estimating the time-to- contact is presented. The method is based on the assumption that the robot is moving on a locally planar ground, parts of ...


Threshold-based algorithms for power-aware load balancing in sensor networks

C. M. Cianci; V. Trifa; A. Martinoli Proceedings 2005 IEEE Swarm Intelligence Symposium, 2005. SIS 2005., 2005

Given the rigid energetic constraints under which a sensor network must operate, efficient means of power management are vital to the success of any sensor network deployment, particularly those in rapidly changing environments. Threshold-based algorithms provide a possible in-network method for adaptive distributed control of energy consumption.


More eLearning Resources

IEEE.tv Videos

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IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Evolving Insect Locomotion using Non-uniform Cellular Automata

    This article presents a model for the evolution of locomotion behavior in a simulated insect. In our model, locomotion is defined over a discrete state space using non-uniform cellular automata. The architecture of the model is inspired from the distributed model for leg coordination proposed by Cruse. We apply a genetic algorithm to a population of non-uniform cellular automata to evolve locomotion behaviors. We demostrate that this model can be used to evolve several commonly observed gaits of insects. Additionally, we show that the evolutionary process yielded periodic attractors which are invariant from the initial conditions

  • Complex hardware morphologies: Walking machines

    This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction, Evolving simulated insects, Evolution of walking machines, From swimming to walking, Dynamic gait for a quadruped robot, Conclusions

  • Learning Ant Foraging Behaviors

    Insects are good at cooperatively solving many complex tasks. For example, foraging for food far away from a nest can be solved through relatively simple behaviors in combination with pheromones. As task complexity increases, however, it may become difficult to find individual agent rules which yield a desired emergent cooperative behavior, or to know if any such rules exist at all. For such tasks, machine learning techniques like evolutionary computation (EC) may prove a valuable approach to searching the space of possible rule combinations. This paper presents an application of genetic programming to search for foraging behaviors. The learned foraging behaviors use only pheromone information to find the path to the nest and to the food source.

  • Adaptive locomotion in a complex environment: simulation of stick insect gap crossing behaviour

    In a complex three dimensional environment, the ability to climb across large gaps and obstacles is fundamental for a stick insect. The same ability is desired for a walking animat that operates in a similar habitat, In this study, the neural network simulation WALKNET that has been modelled on stick insect walking behaviour is used as a basis for the introduction of new behaviours that enable it to climb over large gaps. Gap crossing behaviour of stick insects has been studied to show which behaviours are most crucial for reaching the far edge. As slowing down of forward movement and searching movements of the front legs in the gap have been considered most important, these two behaviours have been analysed. Subsequently, new modules for velocity control, adaptation of swing amplitudes and generation of searching movements have been implemented into the WALKNET controller. With these innovations, the animat is able to climb across gaps of more than twice its normal step length, using similar strategies as the biological model. The new behaviours improve its adaptability and performance under challenging environmental conditions. Further results of experimental gap crossing studies are discussed with respect to their value for the walking simulation and robotic applications.

  • Maze Navigation Using Optical Flow

    Some recent work with autonomous robots has focused on using optical flow for "direct" control of speed and rotation in obstacle avoidance and other simple behaviors. This work has been inspired by work with insects showing similar mechanisms. To extend these behaviors, three methods of maze navigation are investigated in a simulated robot modeled after a real one. A motor-based method places biases iii the obstacle avoidance control law used previously. A perception-based method uses optical flow to detect possibilities for action (e.g., to turn left or right). Both of these require that the agent have a list of biases in order to navigate. The third method, called the Salience Centroid Method, is based on a theory of the role of the hippocampus in rat navigation. This method trades off the memory of the first two for more advanced perceptual processing and allows the most flexible behavior.

  • Getting Sued

    President of Earth Sciences Associates in Palo Alto and a consulting professor at Stanford University, Richard Meehan's career has taken him from MIT to the Andes of central Chile and to northeast Thailand, where "there were insects that laid eggs in your skin as you slept."

  • Attracting Similar Shapes Towards Each Other

    This paper draws an analogy between the way insects use vision to move themselves with respect to local landmarks, and the problem of moving objects relative to each other in vision-guided robotic assembly. In particular, an algorithm is presented for attracting similar shapes together which was directly inspired by a model of navigation in honeybees, and which shares the same characteristics of robustness and immunity to noise. In particular, the algorithm can rotate, translate and scale one 2D shape to align it with another despite the presence of significant distortion and missing or extraneous features.

  • Processes: A Dynamical Integration of Computer Science into Mathematical Education

    This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction, The Hunting Of The Hidden Treasure: An Interactive Game And An Introduction To Processes And Strategies, The Rich Realm Of Processes, Change, And Chance: A Survey Of Possible Projects, Population Growth And Dynamical Equilibrium Among Populations: An Introduction To Ecological Thinking, Cellular Growth And Morphogenesis: Order Out Of The Iteration Of Arbitrary Rules, Trees, Insects, And Biomorphs: An Exploration Into The Spaces Of Algorithms And Evolution, Enter Chance: Picking Up White And Black Balls, Conclusion, Appendix: Skeleton Programs In IBM-PC LCSI Logo

  • No title

    This is the first volume in a series about creating and maintaining taxonomies and their practical applications, especially in search functions. In Book 1 (The Taxobook: History, Theories, and Concepts of Knowledge Organization), the author introduces the very foundations of classification, starting with the ancient Greek philosophers Plato and Aristotle, as well as Theophrastus and the Roman Pliny the Elder. They were first in a line of distinguished thinkers and philosophers to ponder the organization of the world around them and attempt to apply a structure or framework to that world. The author continues by discussing the works and theories of several other philosophers from Medieval and Renaissance times, including Saints Aquinas and Augustine, William of Occam, Andrea Cesalpino, Carl Linnaeus, and Rene Descartes. In the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries, John Locke, Immanuel Kant, James Frederick Ferrier, Charles Ammi Cutter, and Melvil Dewey contributed greatly to the theori s of classification systems and knowledge organization. Cutter and Dewey, especially, created systems that are still in use today. Chapter 8 covers the contributions of Shiyali Ramamrita Ranganathan, who is considered by many to be the "father of modern library science." He created the concept of faceted vocabularies, which are widely used--even if they are not well understood--on many e-commerce websites. Following the discussions and historical review, the author has included a glossary that covers all three books of this series so that it can be referenced as you work your way through the second and third volumes. The author believes that it is important to understand the history of knowledge organization and the differing viewpoints of various philosophers--even if that understanding is only that the differing viewpoints simply exist. Knowing the differing viewpoints will help answer the fundamental questions: Why do we want to build taxonomies? How do we build them to serve multiple points of view? Table of Contents: List of Figures / Preface / Acknowledgments / Origins of Knowledge Organization Theory: Early Philosophy of Knowledge / Saints and Traits: Realism and Nominalism / Arranging the glowers… and the Birds, and the Insects, and Everything Else: Early Naturalists and Taxonomies / The Age of Enlightenment Impacts Knowledge Theory / 18th-Century Developments: Knowledge Theory Coming to the Foreground / High Resolution: Classification Sharpens in the 19th and 20th Centuries / Outlining the World and Its Parts / Facets: An Indian Mathematician and Children's Toys at Selfridge's / Points of Knowledge / Glossary / End Notes / Author Biography

  • Look Before You Leap: Peering Behavior for Depth Perception

    When presented with a water or an air gap barrier, animals often engage in peering, or side-to-sided head movements, before leaping across the barrier. This strategy is used instead of depth recovery using stereopsis, and likely gives a much better estimate of distance. In this article we present a neurocomputational model of peering, hosted on a small robot, that explains the essential characteristics of peering reported in the literature. The model builds on recent evidence for non-direction selective movement detectors in insects. Through non-linear transformation of the retinal image, the model produces a 'leap' command without intermediate reconstruction of the external space of the animal.



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