Conferences related to Films

Back to Top

2010 International Conference on Nano Science and Technology (ICNST)

The aim objective of ICNST 2010 is to provide a platform for researchers, engineers, academicians as well as industrial professionals from all over the world to present their research results and development activities in Nano Science and Technology.


2008 International Conference on Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (cat-CVD) Process (HWCVD5)

Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (HWCVD, also known as catalytic CVD, initiated CVD, and Hot Filament CVD) achieves superior properties in silicon (amorphous, micro- and nanocrystalline epi-, poly-), silicon alloys (nitrides, oxides, carbides), passivation coatings, thin film diamond, hard coatings, nanostructured carbon, carbon nanotubes, metal oxides and polymers. Device applications of HWCVD films include transistors, solar cells, light emitting diodes, photosensors, organic devices, and micromechani


2007 Conference on Insulating Films and Semiconductors (INFOS)

Nano-electrics are changing rapidly since new materials and device architectures are being introduced in order to continue miniaturization and enhance performance without jeopardizing reliability and yield. Insulating films have always been and they still are at the heart of electronic devices regulating charge transfer between metals and semiconductors. Moving beyond their traditional role however and as they become thinner than a few atomic layers, insulators and required.


2005 Conference on Insulating Films and Semiconductors (INFOS)


2004 Euroregional Workshop on Thin Silicon Devices


More Conferences

Periodicals related to Films

Back to Top

Applied Superconductivity, IEEE Transactions on

Contains articles on the applications and other relevant technology. Electronic applications include analog and digital circuits employing thin films and active devices such as Josephson junctions. Power applications include magnet design as well asmotors, generators, and power transmission


Magnetics, IEEE Transactions on

Science and technology related to the basic physics and engineering of magnetism, magnetic materials, applied magnetics, magnetic devices, and magnetic data storage. The Transactions publishes scholarly articles of archival value as well as tutorial expositions and critical reviews of classical subjects and topics of current interest.


Microelectromechanical Systems, Journal of

A journal covering Microsensing, Microactuation, Micromechanics, Microdynamics, and Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS). Contains articles on devices with dimensions that typically range from macrometers to millimeters, microfabrication techniques, microphenomena; microbearings, and microsystems; theoretical, computational, modeling and control results; new materials and designs; tribology; microtelemanipulation; and applications to biomedical engineering, optics, fluidics, etc. The Journal is jointly sponsored by the IEEE Electron Devices ...




Xplore Articles related to Films

Back to Top

Aluminum infrared plasmonic perfect absorbers fabricated by colloidal lithography

Thang Duy Dao; Kai Chen; Satoshi Ishii; Akihiko Ohi; Toshihide Nabatame; Masa-hiro Kitajima; Tadaaki Nagao 2015 11th Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics Pacific Rim (CLEO-PR), 2015

We report on the fabrication of large-area aluminum plasmonic perfect absorber (Al-PA) using colloidal lithography combined with reactive ion etching process. Using the Al-PA, we demonstrate selective thermal emitters and tailor-made molecular vibrational sensing.


Alloy plasmonic materials

Yoshiaki. Nishijima; Yoshikazu. Hashimoto; Seniutinas Gediminas; Armandas Balcytis; Saulius Juodkazis 2015 11th Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics Pacific Rim (CLEO-PR), 2015

We focused on the Au, Ag and Cu alloy systems and the experimental determination of their optical permittivity using optical transmission and reflection measurements with thin metal films. The optical constants define the plasmon resonance frequency and the electro-magnetic field intensity localized around the nanoparticles. However it is less known how the alloy metals perform in the field enhancement. Due ...


Scientists foresee automatic transistor production

Electrical Engineering, 1959

None


Magnetic properties of the insulating state of the organic superconductor, /spl Beta/-[(CH/sub 3/)/sub 4/N][Pd(dmit)/sub 2/L/sub 2/

K. Seya; Y. Kobayashi; T. Nakarnura; T. Takahashi; Y. Osako; H. Kobayashi; R. Kato; A. Kobayashi; H. Iguchi International Conference on Science and Technology of Synthetic Metals, 1994

First Page of the Article ![](/xploreAssets/images/absImages/00835432.png)


Tribology of a solid fluorocarbon, film on magnetic recording media

T. E. Karis; G. W. Tyndall; M. S. Crowder 1998 IEEE International Magnetics Conference (INTERMAG), 1998

First Page of the Article ![](/xploreAssets/images/absImages/00737104.png)


More Xplore Articles

Educational Resources on Films

Back to Top

eLearning

Aluminum infrared plasmonic perfect absorbers fabricated by colloidal lithography

Thang Duy Dao; Kai Chen; Satoshi Ishii; Akihiko Ohi; Toshihide Nabatame; Masa-hiro Kitajima; Tadaaki Nagao 2015 11th Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics Pacific Rim (CLEO-PR), 2015

We report on the fabrication of large-area aluminum plasmonic perfect absorber (Al-PA) using colloidal lithography combined with reactive ion etching process. Using the Al-PA, we demonstrate selective thermal emitters and tailor-made molecular vibrational sensing.


Alloy plasmonic materials

Yoshiaki. Nishijima; Yoshikazu. Hashimoto; Seniutinas Gediminas; Armandas Balcytis; Saulius Juodkazis 2015 11th Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics Pacific Rim (CLEO-PR), 2015

We focused on the Au, Ag and Cu alloy systems and the experimental determination of their optical permittivity using optical transmission and reflection measurements with thin metal films. The optical constants define the plasmon resonance frequency and the electro-magnetic field intensity localized around the nanoparticles. However it is less known how the alloy metals perform in the field enhancement. Due ...


Scientists foresee automatic transistor production

Electrical Engineering, 1959

None


Magnetic properties of the insulating state of the organic superconductor, /spl Beta/-[(CH/sub 3/)/sub 4/N][Pd(dmit)/sub 2/L/sub 2/

K. Seya; Y. Kobayashi; T. Nakarnura; T. Takahashi; Y. Osako; H. Kobayashi; R. Kato; A. Kobayashi; H. Iguchi International Conference on Science and Technology of Synthetic Metals, 1994

First Page of the Article ![](/xploreAssets/images/absImages/00835432.png)


Tribology of a solid fluorocarbon, film on magnetic recording media

T. E. Karis; G. W. Tyndall; M. S. Crowder 1998 IEEE International Magnetics Conference (INTERMAG), 1998

First Page of the Article ![](/xploreAssets/images/absImages/00737104.png)


More eLearning Resources

IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Glossary

    A distinguishing feature of video games is their interactivity, and sound plays an important role in this: a player's actions can trigger dialogue, sound effects, ambient sound, and music. And yet game sound has been neglected in the growing literature on game studies. This book fills that gap, introducing readers to the many complex aspects of game audio, from its development in early games to theoretical discussions of immersion and realism. In Game Sound, Karen Collins draws on a range of sources--including composers, sound designers, voice-over actors and other industry professionals, Internet articles, fan sites, industry conferences, magazines, patent documents, and, of course, the games themselves--to offer a broad overview of the history, theory, and production practice of video game audio. Game Sound has two underlying themes: how and why games are different from or similar to film or other linear audiovisual media; and technology and the constraints it has placed on the production of game audio. Collins focuses first on the historical development of game audio, from penny arcades through the rise of home games and the recent rapid developments in the industry. She then examines the production process for a contemporary game at a large game company, discussing the roles of composers, sound designers, voice talent, and audio programmers; considers the growing presence of licensed intellectual property (particularly popular music and films) in games; and explores the function of audio in games in theoretical terms. Finally, she discusses the difficulties posed by nonlinearity and interactivity for the composer of game music.

  • References

    A distinguishing feature of video games is their interactivity, and sound plays an important role in this: a player's actions can trigger dialogue, sound effects, ambient sound, and music. And yet game sound has been neglected in the growing literature on game studies. This book fills that gap, introducing readers to the many complex aspects of game audio, from its development in early games to theoretical discussions of immersion and realism. In Game Sound, Karen Collins draws on a range of sources--including composers, sound designers, voice-over actors and other industry professionals, Internet articles, fan sites, industry conferences, magazines, patent documents, and, of course, the games themselves--to offer a broad overview of the history, theory, and production practice of video game audio. Game Sound has two underlying themes: how and why games are different from or similar to film or other linear audiovisual media; and technology and the constraints it has placed on the production of game audio. Collins focuses first on the historical development of game audio, from penny arcades through the rise of home games and the recent rapid developments in the industry. She then examines the production process for a contemporary game at a large game company, discussing the roles of composers, sound designers, voice talent, and audio programmers; considers the growing presence of licensed intellectual property (particularly popular music and films) in games; and explores the function of audio in games in theoretical terms. Finally, she discusses the difficulties posed by nonlinearity and interactivity for the composer of game music.

  • Flexible OLEDs

    One of the significant advantages of OLEDs is that they can be fabricated on flexible substrates. The use of flexible substrates instead of conventional glass substrates can significantly reduce the thickness and weight of displays and lighting. In addition, flexible OLEDs bring about additional attractive features from the product design point of view, because flexible OLEDs can provide such unique designs as curved, bent, folded, rolled, and ultimately flexible. Moreover, use of flexible substrates has great potential of production innovation such as utilization of roll???to???roll (R2R) process with low mass???production cost. As the candidates for flexible substrates, ultra???thin glasses, stainless steel foils and plastic films are well known. This chapter describes current status and future potential of three types of flexible substrates and their applications to flexible OLED displays and lightings.

  • The Bright Side

    Aluminum shaped the twentieth century. It enabled high-speed travel and gravity-defying flight. It was the material of a streamlined aesthetic that came to represent modernity. And it became an essential ingredient in industrial and domestic products that ranged from airplanes and cars to designer chairs and artificial Christmas trees. It entered modern homes as packaging, foil, pots and pans and even infiltrated our bodies through food, medicine, and cosmetics. In Aluminum Dreams, Mimi Sheller describes how the materiality and meaning of aluminum transformed modern life and continues to shape the world today. Aluminum, Sheller tells us, changed mobility and mobilized modern life. It enabled air power, the space age and moon landings. Yet, as Sheller makes clear, aluminum was important not only in twentieth- century technology, innovation, architecture, and design but also in underpinning global military power, uneven development, and crucial environmental and health concerns. Sheller describes aluminum's shiny utopia but also its dark side. The unintended consequences of aluminum's widespread use include struggles for sovereignty and resource control in Africa, India, and the Caribbean; the unleashing of multinational corporations; and the pollution of the earth through mining and smelting (and the battle to save it). Using a single material as an entry point to understanding a global history of modernization and its implications for the future, Aluminum Dreams forces us to ask: How do we assemble the material culture of modernity and what are its environmental consequences? Aluminum Dreams includes a generous selection of striking images of iconic aluminum designs, many in color, drawn from advertisements by Alcoa, Bohn, Kaiser, and other major corporations, p amphlets, films, and exhibitions.

  • Deposition of Coatings by PECVD

    This chapter contains sections titled: Deposition of Organic Films Deposition of Inorganic Films Questions References

  • The Magnetization of Ferromagnetic Materials

    This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction Single-Domain Particles Superparamagnetic Particles Permanent Magnet Materials Domain Walls Domain Structure The Analysis of the Magnetization Curves of Bulk Material Thermal Effects Associated with the Hysteresis Loop Soft Magnetic Materials Time Effects Thin Films

  • Index

    A distinguishing feature of video games is their interactivity, and sound plays an important role in this: a player's actions can trigger dialogue, sound effects, ambient sound, and music. And yet game sound has been neglected in the growing literature on game studies. This book fills that gap, introducing readers to the many complex aspects of game audio, from its development in early games to theoretical discussions of immersion and realism. In Game Sound, Karen Collins draws on a range of sources--including composers, sound designers, voice-over actors and other industry professionals, Internet articles, fan sites, industry conferences, magazines, patent documents, and, of course, the games themselves--to offer a broad overview of the history, theory, and production practice of video game audio. Game Sound has two underlying themes: how and why games are different from or similar to film or other linear audiovisual media; and technology and the constraints it has placed on the production of game audio. Collins focuses first on the historical development of game audio, from penny arcades through the rise of home games and the recent rapid developments in the industry. She then examines the production process for a contemporary game at a large game company, discussing the roles of composers, sound designers, voice talent, and audio programmers; considers the growing presence of licensed intellectual property (particularly popular music and films) in games; and explores the function of audio in games in theoretical terms. Finally, she discusses the difficulties posed by nonlinearity and interactivity for the composer of game music.

  • Diamond ThinFilm Recessed Gate FieldEffect Transistors Fabricated by Electron Cyclotron Resonance Plasma Etching

    A new technique for etching boron-doped homoepi- taxial diamond films was used to fabricate mesa-isolated recessed gate field-effect transistors that operate at temperatures up to 350°C. The upper temperature range is limited by the gate leakage current. The room-temperature hole concentration and mobility of the diamond film active layer were 1.2 x 1013 cm-3 and 280 cm2/V · s, respectively. The maximum transconductance was 87 lS / mm at 200°C.

  • No title

    Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) addresses problems of interaction design: understanding user needs to inform design, delivering novel designs that meet user needs, and evaluating new and existing designs to determine their success in meeting user needs. Qualitative methods have an essential role to play in this enterprise, particularly in understanding user needs and behaviours and evaluating situated use of technology. Qualitative methods allow HCI researchers to ask questions where the answers are more complex and interesting than "true" or "false," and may also be unexpected. In this lecture, we draw on the analogy of making a documentary film to discuss important issues in qualitative HCI research: historically, films were presented as finished products, giving the viewer little insight into the production process; more recently, there has been a trend to go behind the scenes to expose some of the painstaking work that went into creating the final cut. Similarly, in qualitative r search, the essential work behind the scenes is rarely discussed. There are many "how to" guides for particular methods, but few texts that start with the purpose of a study and then discuss the important details of how to select a suitable method, how to adapt it to fit the study context, or how to deal with unexpected challenges that arise. We address this gap by presenting a repertoire of qualitative techniques for understanding user needs, practices and experiences with technology for the purpose of informing design. We also discuss practical considerations such as tactics for recruiting participants and ways of getting started when faced with a pile of interview transcripts. Our particular focus is on semi- structured qualitative studies, which occupy a space between ethnography and surveys--typically involving observations, interviews and similar methods for data gathering, and methods of analysis based on systematic coding of data. Just as a documentary team faces challen es that often go unreported when arranging expeditions or interviews and gathering and editing footage within time and budget constraints, so the qualitative research team faces challenges in obtaining ethical clearance, recruiting participants, analysing data, choosing how and what to report, etc. We present illustrative examples drawn from prior experience to bring to life the purpose, planning and practical considerations of doing qualitative studies for interaction design. We include takeaway checklists for planning, conducting, reporting and evaluating semi- structured qualitative studies.

  • Bibliography

    We are active with our mobile devices; we play games, watch films, listen to music, check social media, and tap screens and keyboards while we are on the move. In _ Mood and Mobility_, Richard Coyne argues that not only do we communicate, process information, and entertain ourselves through devices and social media; we also receive, modify, intensify, and transmit moods. Designers, practitioners, educators, researchers, and users should pay more attention to the moods created around our smartphones, tablets, and laptops. Drawing on research from a range of disciplines, including experimental psychology, phenomenology, cultural theory, and architecture, Coyne shows that users of social media are not simply passive receivers of moods; they are complicit in making moods. Devoting each chapter to a particular mood -- from curiosity and pleasure to anxiety and melancholy -- Coyne shows that devices and technologies do affect people's moods, although not always directly. He s ows that mood effects are transitional; different moods suit different occasions, and derive character from emotional shifts. Furthermore, moods are active; we enlist all the resources of human sociability to create moods. And finally, the discourse about mood is deeply reflexive; in a kind of meta- moodiness, we talk about our moods and have feelings about them. Mood, in Coyne's distinctive telling, provides a new way to look at the ever-changing world of ubiquitous digital technologies.



Standards related to Films

Back to Top

No standards are currently tagged "Films"