Conferences related to Encapsulation

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2014 IEEE 27th International Conference on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS)

This Conference reflects from the rapid proliferation of the commitment and success of the Microsystems research community. In recent years, the IEEE MEMS Conference has attracted more than 700 participants, 800+ abstract submissions and has created the forum to present over 200 select papers in podium and poster/oral sessions. Its single-session format provides ample opportunity for interaction between attendees, presenters and exhibitors.

  • 2013 IEEE 26th International Conference on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS)

    Development of micro -electro mechanical systems (MEMS) focusing on design, simulation and analysis tools, fabrication technologies and processes, integration techniques, and assembly and packaging approaches. Application of MEMS in sensors and actuators, microdevices for opto -mechanical systems, fluidic microsystems, biomedical engineering, wireless communication, power supply and energy harvesting and nano - electro -mechanical devices.

  • 2012 IEEE 25th International Conference on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS)

    Premier Conference on MEMS reporting the lastest research results on every aspect of microsystems technology.

  • 2011 IEEE 24th International Conference on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS)

    MEMS 2011 will be held in Cancun, Mexico from 23-27 January 2011 at the Hilton. The MEMS Conference series has evolved into the premier annual event reporting research results on every aspect of microsystems technology. In recent years, it has attracted more than 700 participants, 750+ abstract submissions and has presented over 200 select papers in non-overlapping podium and poster/oral sessions. Its single-session format provides ample opportunity for interaction between attendees.

  • 2010 IEEE 23rd International Conference on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS)

    Development of micro-electro mechanical systems (MEMS) focusing on design, simulation and analysis tools, fabrication technologies and processes, integration techniques, and assembly and packaging approaches. Application of MEMS in sensors and actuators, microdevices for opto-mechanical systems, fluidic microsystems, biomedical engineering, wireless communication, power supply and energy harvesting and nano-electro-mechanical devices.

  • 2009 IEEE 22nd International Conference on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS)

    MEMS 2009 will be held in Sorrento, Italy on 26-29 January 2009 at the Hilton Sorrento Palace. the MEMS Conference series has evolved into the premier annual event reporting research results on every aspect of microsystems technology. In recent years, it has attracted more than 700 participants, 750+ abstract submissions and has presented over 200 select papers in non-overlapping podium and poster/oral sessions. Its single-session format provides ample opportunity for interaction between attendees, present

  • 2008 IEEE 21st International Conference on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS)

    The IEEE MEMS 2008 Conference series has evolved into the premier annual event reporting research results on every aspect of microsystems technology. Topics include: Fabrication and Packaging Technologies, Materials and Device Characterization, Biomedical and Chemical Devices/Systems, Mechanical and Physical Sensors & Systems, Design, Stimulation, and Theoretical Concepts with Experimental Verification, Micro-fluidic Components & Systems, Micro-Actuators, Optical and RF MEMS, Energy and Power MEMS and Nano


2014 IEEE 40th Photovoltaic Specialists Conference (PVSC)

The PVSC is a technical conference dedicated to the science and application of photovoltaics for solar electricity generation. Technical Program Areas: 1. Fundamentals and New Concepts for Future Technologies 2. Thin Film Polycrystalline Photovoltaics 3. III-V and Concentrator Technologies 4. Crystalline Silicon Technologies 5. Thin Film Silicon Based PV Technologies 6. Organic Photovoltaics 7. Space Technologies 8. Characterization and Measurement Methods 9. PV Modules and Manufacturing 10. PV Systems and Applications 11. PV Velocity Forum


2013 8th International Microsystems, Packaging, Assembly and Circuits Technology Conference (IMPACT)

In order to avoid dangerous climate change, provide sustainable green energy and better life for global population, the ICT products and services need to gain further effective improvements in system performance and integration, and innovate to reduce environmental impact. Over the past years, IMPACT conference, a remarkable platform, continually pay attention to the latest trends of global micro-system, packaging and circuit technology, and encourage the development and research of new materials, processes and designs in realizing the versatile system demands for advanced consumer, communication, cloud & mobile computing, medical and automobile applications.

  • 2012 7th International Microsystems, Packaging, Assembly and Circuits Technology Conference (IMPACT)

    The theme is IMPACT-Leading Innovation. Advanced Packaging Technologies, Power Module and Green Packaging,3D Integration,LED & Optoelectronics Packaging,Interconnections & nanotechnology,Modeling, Simulation & Design.

  • 2011 6th International Microsystems, Packaging, Assembly and Circuits Technology Conference (IMPACT)

    The theme is IMPACT-Leading Innovation which reflects the age of technology resolution. The appearance of smart phones and touch panels declare the innovation time and we highly welcome outstanding papers from all over the world to respond the theme and compete with elites overseas on the international stage.

  • 2010 5th International Microsystems, Packaging, Assembly and Circuits Technology Conference (IMPACT)

    Advanced and Emerging Packaging Technology, Nanotechnology & Interconnection, Thermal Management, Advanced Materials, Process & , Advanced Sensor & Microsystems Technology, Modeling, Testing & Design, Electro Deposition and Electrochemical Processing Technology

  • 2009 4th International Microsystems, Packaging, Assembly and Circuits Technology Conference (IMPACT)

    Advanced and Emerging Packaging Technology, Nanotechnology & Interconnection, Thermal Management, Advanced Materials, Process & , Advanced Sensor & Microsystems Technology, Modeling, Testing & Design, Electro Deposition and Electrochemical Processing Technology


2012 4th Electronic System-Integration Technology Conference (ESTC)

The premier global European event that brings together key researchers, innovators, decision-makers, technologists, businesses, and professional associations working in interconnect and packaging technologies for electronic system integration in order to present, demonstrate, and discuss the latest developments in assembly and interconnection technology and new innovative applications.


2012 6th Advanced Satellite Multimedia Systems Conference and the 12th Signal Processing for Space Communications Workshop (ASMS/SPSC)

The ASMS/SPSC conference is a biannual event aiming at providing opportunities for industry and research institutions to get the latest updates and to exchange information about recent advances and emerging technologies for mobile, broadband and broadcast satellite communication systems. Tutorials, keynote speeches, panels, and invited technical session complement the technical program in order to provide multiple views on the R&D trends in the SatCom field.


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Periodicals related to Encapsulation

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Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Broad coverage of concepts and methods of the physical and engineering sciences applied in biology and medicine, ranging from formalized mathematical theory through experimental science and technological development to practical clinical applications.


Microelectromechanical Systems, Journal of

A journal covering Microsensing, Microactuation, Micromechanics, Microdynamics, and Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS). Contains articles on devices with dimensions that typically range from macrometers to millimeters, microfabrication techniques, microphenomena; microbearings, and microsystems; theoretical, computational, modeling and control results; new materials and designs; tribology; microtelemanipulation; and applications to biomedical engineering, optics, fluidics, etc. The Journal is jointly sponsored by the IEEE Electron Devices ...




Xplore Articles related to Encapsulation

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Adaptive provisioning using virtual machines and autonomous role-based management

K. Begnum; M. Burgess; J. Sechrest International Conference on Autonomic and Autonomous Systems (ICAS'06), 2006

A modern server system must deliver a complex set of obligations towards its users. We study the concept of roles as autonomous encapsulations of a set of promises. Using visualization and configuration management, every defined role for a real-life computer system can be realized as a self managing agent that is aware of other, related roles within the same broader ...


Encapsulated inertial systems

C. H. Ahn; D. L. Christensen; D. B. Heinz; V. A. Hong; E. J. Ng; J. Rodriguez; Y. Yang; G. O'Brien; T. W. Kenny 2016 IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM), 2016

There is significant interest in integration of multiple MEMS functionalities into a single compact device. Our group has developed a wafer-scale encapsulation process that provides an ultraclean, stable environment for operation of MEMS timing references, which has been commercialized by SiTime, Inc. In this paper, we discuss some of the issues associated with incorporation of inertial sensors into this encapsulation ...


Program refinement using generic object

Y. Sato; Y. Morimoto; T. Ichikawa Proceedings Fourth International Conference on Software Engineering and Knowledge Engineering, 1992

This paper introduces a generic object which behaves flexibly according to its related objects and conditions for execution in an object-oriented programming system, called ISL-xscheme. A generic object is an instance of `Generic' class and created by providing abstract classes as a domain. It behaves adequately in the domain depending on its constraints and the messages sent to it. Generic ...


Abstracting business level UML diagrams from Web applications

G. A. Di Lucca; A. R. Fasolino; P. Tramontana; U. De Carlini Fifth IEEE International Workshop on Web Site Evolution, 2003. Theme: Architecture. Proceedings., 2003

In this paper, a reverse engineering approach for reconstructing UML diagrams at business level of the application domain of a Web application is presented. In particular, the approach allows the reconstruction of the UML class diagram providing an object-oriented conceptual model of the application domain, sequence diagrams modeling the interactions among the identified business objects and use case diagrams modeling ...


Optimizing multiple EDA tools within the ASIC design flow

L. Bening; H. Foster IEEE Design & Test of Computers, 2001

Selecting a single register transfer level (RTL) coding style-one that maximizes the performance of simulation, Boolean equivalence, and model checking while achieving an optimal flow through synthesis and physical design-is a formidable task. To reconcile competing tool-coding requirements, the Hewlett-Packard Richardson VLSI Lab has developed a coding style and a design flow methodology that incorporates modern programming language principles. Using ...


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Educational Resources on Encapsulation

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eLearning

Adaptive provisioning using virtual machines and autonomous role-based management

K. Begnum; M. Burgess; J. Sechrest International Conference on Autonomic and Autonomous Systems (ICAS'06), 2006

A modern server system must deliver a complex set of obligations towards its users. We study the concept of roles as autonomous encapsulations of a set of promises. Using visualization and configuration management, every defined role for a real-life computer system can be realized as a self managing agent that is aware of other, related roles within the same broader ...


Encapsulated inertial systems

C. H. Ahn; D. L. Christensen; D. B. Heinz; V. A. Hong; E. J. Ng; J. Rodriguez; Y. Yang; G. O'Brien; T. W. Kenny 2016 IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM), 2016

There is significant interest in integration of multiple MEMS functionalities into a single compact device. Our group has developed a wafer-scale encapsulation process that provides an ultraclean, stable environment for operation of MEMS timing references, which has been commercialized by SiTime, Inc. In this paper, we discuss some of the issues associated with incorporation of inertial sensors into this encapsulation ...


Program refinement using generic object

Y. Sato; Y. Morimoto; T. Ichikawa Proceedings Fourth International Conference on Software Engineering and Knowledge Engineering, 1992

This paper introduces a generic object which behaves flexibly according to its related objects and conditions for execution in an object-oriented programming system, called ISL-xscheme. A generic object is an instance of `Generic' class and created by providing abstract classes as a domain. It behaves adequately in the domain depending on its constraints and the messages sent to it. Generic ...


Abstracting business level UML diagrams from Web applications

G. A. Di Lucca; A. R. Fasolino; P. Tramontana; U. De Carlini Fifth IEEE International Workshop on Web Site Evolution, 2003. Theme: Architecture. Proceedings., 2003

In this paper, a reverse engineering approach for reconstructing UML diagrams at business level of the application domain of a Web application is presented. In particular, the approach allows the reconstruction of the UML class diagram providing an object-oriented conceptual model of the application domain, sequence diagrams modeling the interactions among the identified business objects and use case diagrams modeling ...


Optimizing multiple EDA tools within the ASIC design flow

L. Bening; H. Foster IEEE Design & Test of Computers, 2001

Selecting a single register transfer level (RTL) coding style-one that maximizes the performance of simulation, Boolean equivalence, and model checking while achieving an optimal flow through synthesis and physical design-is a formidable task. To reconcile competing tool-coding requirements, the Hewlett-Packard Richardson VLSI Lab has developed a coding style and a design flow methodology that incorporates modern programming language principles. Using ...


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IEEE.tv Videos

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IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Intelligent Control: An Overview of Techniques

    In many established fields, the label ?>intelligent?> heralds new developments that take issue with some traditional assumptions in research. In the case of intelligent control, an explicit attempt is made to draw inspiration from nature, biology, and artificial intelligence, and a methodology is promoted that is more accepting of heuristics and approximationsï¿¿-ï¿¿and is less insistent on theoretical rigor and completenessï¿¿-ï¿¿than is the case with most research in control science. Beyond such general and abstract features, succinct characterizations of intelligent control are difficult. Extensional treatments are an easier matter. Fuzzy logic, neural networks, genetic algorithms, and expert systems constitute the main areas of the field, with applications to nonlinear identification, nonlinear control design, controller tuning, system optimization, and encapsulation of human operator expertise. Intelligent control is thus no narrow specialization; it furnishes a diverse body of techniques that potentially addresses most of the technical challenges in control systems. It is also important to emphasize that intelligent control is by no means methodologically opposed to theory and analysis. Chapter 6 of this book, for example, discusses some theoretical results for neural networks and fuzzy models as nonlinear approximators Introductory tutorials to the key topics in intelligent control are provided in this chapter. No prior background in these topics is assumed. Examples from ship maneuvering, robotics, and automotive diagnostics help motivate the discussion. (Other chapters in this volume, notably Chapter 16, also outline applications of intelligent control.) General observations on autonomy and adaptationï¿ ¿-ï¿¿two characteristics that are often considered essential to any definition of intelligenceï¿¿-ï¿¿are also included.

  • The Acceptability Semantics for Logic Programs

    We present a simple yet powerful semantics for Negation as Failure (NAF) in logic programming, called the acceptability semantics. This is based on the idea that NAF literals represent possible extensions of a given logic program, provided that these satisfy an appropriate criterion, namely the acceptability criterion. The importance of this semantics and the way it is formulated lies in the fact that it allows us to abstract away NAF from the object-level syntax of our representation language. This has two significant consequences. First, it introduces a new more general, yet simpler, style of logic programming which is closer to the logical specification of non-monotonic problems, with the same basic computational paradigm of logic programming. Additionally, the understanding of the NAF principle through acceptability provides us with a general encapsulation of this non-monotonic reasoning principle that can be applied to other, richer in language, representation frameworks.

  • Modularity in Logic Programming

    The study of modularity in logic programming has gathered the interest of a growing number of researchers over the past decade and it has been the source of a still open debate. The need for a modular extension to logic programming has been always widely agreed upon. It was in fact acknowledged that relations provide a too fine-grained unit of abstraction for the design of large programs, and that having flat composition of clauses as the only mechanism at disposal leaves the programmer with rather poor tools for structuring programs. There are several desirable properties that we should expect from a modular system. The system should in fact support the re-usability and ease maintenance of programs, allow for abstractlon, parametrization and information hiding, and support rich calculus of transformation and compilation. At the same time, we should also expect that these features do not undermine the declarativity of logic programming as it stands, and therefore that the logical foundations on which the extension relies be as firm and well-established as those of the underlying language. An important issue that should be addressed in the design of a modular language is related to the ability of the underlying abstraction mechanisms to provide an effective support for both the programming disciplines which are usually qualified as programming-in-the-large and programming-in-the-small. The interest in the aforementioned two dimensions of programming inspired the two orthogonal lines of research the study of modularity has evolved along. Various proposals have focused primarily on the issue of programmingin- the- large, inspired by the work of Richard O'Keefe. The idea is to view programs as independent sub-programs, or fragments, to be composed to form larger programs. This idea is formalised by interpreting logic programs as elements of an algebra and by modelli ng their composition in terms of the operators of the algebra (e.g., union, deletion, closure and combination of the above). The distinguishing property of this approach is that the modular extension of logic programming takes place without any need to extend the language of Horn clauses. Information hiding and encapsulation can also be accounted for in this framework quite elegantly. Algebraic program composition can be made more selective so as to distinguish, within a module. predicates to be imported from other modules and/or predicates to be exported to other modules. Another approach to modularity originated with the work of Dale Miller and is inspired by the observation that logical systems richer than Horn clauses could be employed to provide a natural support for modular programming. In particular, the idea is to model the operators for building and composing modules directly in terms of the logical connectives of a language defined as an extension of Horn Clause Logic, and based on the use of implication goals in the body of clauses. When D is a set of universally quantified clauses, the implication goal D ⊃ G, in a program P, can be interpreted operationally as a request to load the clauses in D before attempting G, and then discard them after the derivation for G succeeds or fails. This dynamic form of composition supports naturally a modular approach to writing code. Modules can be introduced as named collections of clauses and programs can be structured as collections of modules each one dedicated to answer a specific class of queries. Cross- referencing between modules and module-composition can then be accounted for relying on the workings of implication goals. If, in module M, the answer to a goal G requires that the clauses of module 1111 be loaded, then we will simply enforce the evaluation of G in the composition of M and M1 by means of the implication goal M1 ⊃ G. A notion of parametric module can also be accounted for in this framework. The fact that we allow implication goals of the form ∃χ(D(χ)&#x...

  • IPTV Applications

    This chapter contains sections titled: Overview and Motivation Basic Architecture Appendix 11.A: Serial Digital Interface Basics Appendix 11.B: MPEG Basics Appendix 11.C: Encapsulation for Transmission of IP Datagrams over MPEG-2/DVB Networks References

  • IP and ATM Internetworking

    Introduction IP Internetworking Overview Overview of LAN Protocol Architectures Internetworking Protocol (IP) Layer Functions IP Packet Structure and Functions Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) Structure and Functions Encapsulation of IP over ATM The "Classical" IP over ATM Network Architecture Model Quality of Service in IP Networks Integrated Services Architecture (IntServ) and RSVP The Differentiated Services (DiffServ) Model

  • Objects in Forum

    A logical characterization of the typical features of object-oriented languages could yield a clear semantical counterpart of their operational meaning and, at the same time, it could allow to define a logic programming language in which it is possible to reason over highly-complex data structures Many approaches to this problem have been proposed in the last years. Classical logic turned out to he unsuitable to model complex mechanisms, such as the dynamic modifications of the state of the objects, in a satisfactory way Girard's Linear Logic [5] provides the means to handle many operational aspects of programming languages from a proof theoretical perspective as shown by Andreoli and Pareschi in [2] In the paper Forum [11], a presentation of higher-order linear logic, is specialized to deal with state-based systems according to the proof as computation perspective. In this setting it is possible to represent a concrete notion of object assigning a logical meaning to features like class, encapsulation and data abstraction This should be considered as the first step to reconstruct a complete object-oriented language inside a linear logic-based framework

  • Tradeoffs between Reasoning and Modeling

    This chapter contains sections titled: Components, Reactiveness, and Encapsulation, The Logic Programming Paradigm, Component-Based Logic Programming, Don't-Know Nondeterminism, Retractiveness, Paradigmatic Incompatibility, Observability of Component Interactions, Committed-Choice Nondeterminism, Committed-Choice Nondeterminism, Reactiveness Versus Completeness, Declarativeness, Reasoning Versus Modeling Revisited, From Computational to Software Complexity, LP-Completeness, Towards Practical Component-Based Technology, References, Appendix: Rationalism Versus Empiricism

  • IPv4/IPv6 Co-Existence Technologies

    This chapter highlights the myriad defined IPv4/IPv6 co-existence technologies and discusses the salient features and advantages of each to help you to decide where a given technology choice makes the most sense. From a general perspective, the set of IPv4/IPv6 co-existence technologies can be organized into three categories: dual stack - implementation of both IPv4 and IPv6 protocols on network devices; tunneling - encapsulation of an IPv6 packet within an IPv4 packet for transmission over an IPv4 network or vice-versa; translation - IP header, address, and/or port translation such as that performed by host, gateway or network address translation (NAT) devices. The chapter discusses the application support of IPv6. Finally it talks about some service providers' dual protocol strategies involving a combination of technologies from multiple categories.

  • Logic, Algebra and Static Analysis in DM Systems, the IE Way

    We have introduced the Interactive Declarative Environments (ID EST - IE) framework for Direct Manipulation systems based on logic and logic programming. In this object based approach, logic database represents the model world of interest to the user. Four independent declarative modules are used to manage each distinct kind of task required in a DM system. An IE system is a proper composition of four modules. This modular approach provides look and feel independence and supports easy code re-use. For example, the code for generating a given type of menu can easily be used in multiple systems. More interestingly, however, an entire IE system may be used as a single component of a more complex system. For example, a molecule is a kind of graph. An IE graph editor can be used as a component in an IE molecule editor, thus raising the level of the latter designer's task, who can now translates from molecule objects (ex, atom, bond, insert-bond) to graph objects (ex, node, edge, insert-edge) vs. to graphic objects (ex. circle, line, right-down), thereby taking advantage of prior resolution of myriad low level details, We call this transforming the level of the O-GRAM. Logic permits us to provide a formal basis to each type of module, based on the semantics of Horn clauses. This leads to an algebra for system design, with precise definitions of module combining operations, that is, IE system building. We prove that composition of deductive schemas is interference-free; that is, the meaning of the composition of deductive schemas equals the composition of the meanings of the schemas. This establishes that transformed a-GRAMs may be treated as black-boxes in creating other IE systems. Our declarative logic approach is also the basis for a new and unique solution to incremental screen update, via static analysis. Via a form of symbolic executiou, semantic connections be tween object are discovered across module boundaries, thus supporting code encapsulation and obviating the need for explicit pointers. The algorithm has these properties: 1. No new "re-draw" code required; 2. Pre-compute affected picture set at compile time; 3. Provably correct; 4. Implemented, in Prolog; 5. Supports code encapsulation, including multiple independent picture versions of a single data object; G. Sound: No illegal action will be allowed; 7. Complete: Always performs legal user actions.

  • PξP: A Combined Parlog and Prolog Concurrent Object-Oriented Logic programming Language

    Object-Oriented Logic Programming (OOLP) is a hybrid of the objectoriented paradigm and the logic programming paradigm. The concept of object orientation is introduced to Prolog in languages such as LξO and Parlog++, while it is introduced to Parlog in Polka. Prolog-based OOLP languages inherit from Prolog the feature of being nondeterministic, while Parlog-based OOLP languages continue to enjoy the advantage of the concurrency found in Parlog. We present a new object-oriented logic programming language PξP, which supports concurrent execution of nondeterministic objects as well as stream parallelism for communication among these objects. Intuitively, an object has a Parlog- like 'shell' with Prolog-like 'contents.' Each object thus have the searching capabilities of Prolog, and objects execute concurrently, communicating using streams. Hence this coarse-grain concurrent OOLP language benefits from the searching capability of Prolog as well as the excellent concurrency control and stream parallelism of Parlog. The main concerns of our design include the integration of Prolog's backtracking, sequential search with Parlog's concurrent execution. Message passing is restricted to be via the Parlog shell only. Object-oriented features are present to provide encapsulation and code reuse. We note that the PξP language is related to DK_Parlog [1], which supports both Parlog-based procedural methods and Prolog-based knowledge methods in concurrently executing objects



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