Embryo

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An embryo is a multicellular diploid eukaryote in its earliest stage of development, from the time of first cell division until birth, hatching, or germination. (Wikipedia.org)






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2016 IEEE 13th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2016)

The IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI) is the premier forumfor the presentation of technological advances in theoretical and applied biomedical imaging. ISBI 2016 willbe the thirteenth meeting in this series. The previous meetings have played a leading role in facilitatinginteraction between researchers in medical and biological imaging. The 2016 meeting will continue thistradition of fostering crossfertilization among different imaging communities and contributing to an integrativeapproach to biomedical imaging across all scales of observation.

  • 2015 IEEE 12th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2015)

    The IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI) is the premier forum for the presentation of technological advances in theoretical and applied biomedical imaging. ISBI 2015 will be the 12th meeting in this series. The previous meetings have played a leading role in facilitating interaction between researchers in medical and biological imaging. The 2014 meeting will continue this tradition of fostering crossfertilization among different imaging communities and contributing to an integrative approach to biomedical imaging across all scales of observation.

  • 2014 IEEE 11th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2014)

    The IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI) is the premier forum for the presentation of technological advances in theoretical and applied biomedical imaging. ISBI 2014 will be the eleventh meeting in this series. The previous meetings have played a leading role in facilitating interaction between researchers in medical and biological imaging. The 2014 meeting will continue this tradition of fostering crossfertilization among different imaging communities and contributing to an integrative approach to biomedical imaging across all scales of observation.

  • 2013 IEEE 10th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2013)

    To serve the biological, biomedical, bioengineering, bioimaging and other technical communities through a quality program of presentations and papers on the foundation, application, development, and use of biomedical imaging.

  • 2012 IEEE 9th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2012)

    To serve the biological, biomedical, bioengineering, bioimaging, and other technical communities through a quality program of presentations and papers on the foundation, application, development, and use of biomedical imaging.

  • 2011 IEEE 8th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2011)

    To serve the biological, biomedical, bioengineering, bioimaging, and other technical communities through a quality program of presentations and papers on the foundation, application, development, and use of biomedical imaging.

  • 2010 IEEE 7th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2010)

    To serve the biological, biomedical, bioengineering, bioimaging, and other technical communities through a quality program of presentations and papers on the foundation, application, development, and use of biomedical imaging.

  • 2009 IEEE 6th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2009)

    Algorithmic, mathematical and computational aspects of biomedical imaging, from nano- to macroscale. Topics of interest include image formation and reconstruction, computational and statistical image processing and analysis, dynamic imaging, visualization, image quality assessment, and physical, biological and statistical modeling. Molecular, cellular, anatomical and functional imaging modalities and applications.

  • 2008 IEEE 5th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2008)

    Algorithmic, mathematical and computational aspects of biomedical imaging, from nano- to macroscale. Topics of interest include image formation and reconstruction, computational and statistical image processing and analysis, dynamic imaging, visualization, image quality assessment, and physical, biological and statistical modeling. Molecular, cellular, anatomical and functional imaging modalities and applications.

  • 2007 IEEE 4th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: Macro to Nano (ISBI 2007)


2013 IEEE 25th International Conference on Tools with Artificial Intelligence (ICTAI)

The annual IEEE International Conference on Tools with Artificial Intelligence (ICTAI) provides a major international forum where the creation and exchange of ideas related to artificial intelligence are fostered among academia, industry, and government agencies. The conference facilitates the cross-fertilization of these ideas and promotes their transfer into practical tools, for developing intelligent systems and pursuing artificial intelligence applications. The ICTAI encompasses all technical aspects of specifying, developing and evaluating the theoretical underpinnings and applied mechanisms of the AI-based components of computer tools such as algorithms, architectures and languages. Special Event: Celebration of ICTAI 25 years with a special track on AI Directions.


2010 15th National Biomedical Engineering Meeting (BIYOMUT 2010)

15th National Biomedical Engineering Meeting will merge engineering and medical fields both scientifically and physically. It will bring together the scientists, professionals and students from different disciplines to present new findings and exchange their best practices. The meeting will enhouse key note presentations with eminent scientists, original paper presentations, workshops as well as real hospital and laboratory field trips.

  • 2009 14th National Biomedical Engineering Meeting (BIYOMUT 2009)

    14th National Biomedical Engineering Meeting will merge engineering and medical fields both scientifically and physically. It will bring together the scientists and students from different disciplines to present new findings and exchange their best practices. The meeting will enhouse key note presentations with eminent scientists, original paper presentations, workshops as well as real hospital and laboratory field trips.


2006 International Conference on Microtechnologies in Medicine and Biology



Periodicals related to Embryo

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Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Broad coverage of concepts and methods of the physical and engineering sciences applied in biology and medicine, ranging from formalized mathematical theory through experimental science and technological development to practical clinical applications.


Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, IEEE/ACM Transactions on

Specific topics of interest include, but are not limited to, sequence analysis, comparison and alignment methods; motif, gene and signal recognition; molecular evolution; phylogenetics and phylogenomics; determination or prediction of the structure of RNA and Protein in two and three dimensions; DNA twisting and folding; gene expression and gene regulatory networks; deduction of metabolic pathways; micro-array design and analysis; proteomics; ...


Mechatronics, IEEE/ASME Transactions on

Synergetic integration of mechanical engineering with electronic and intelligent computer control in the design and manufacture of industrial products and processes. (4) (IEEE Guide for Authors) A primary purpose is to have an aarchival publication which will encompass both theory and practice. Papers will be published which disclose significant new knowledge needed to implement intelligent mechatronics systems, from analysis and ...


Nanobioscience, IEEE Transactions on

Basic and applied papers dealing both with engineering, physics, chemistry, and computer science and with biology and medicine with respect to bio-molecules and cells. The content of acceptable papers ranges from practical/clinical/environmental applications to formalized mathematical theory. TAB #73-June 2001. (Original name-IEEE Transactions on Molecular Cellular and Tissue Engineering). T-NB publishes basic and applied research papers dealing with the study ...




Xplore Articles related to Embryo

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An Organic View of Prototyping in Information System Development

Guohua Bai 2014 IEEE 17th International Conference on Computational Science and Engineering, 2014

This paper presents an organic view of prototyping for managing dynamic factors involved in evolutionary design of information systems (IS). Those dynamic factors can be caused by, for example, continuing suggestions from users, changes in the technologies, and users-designers learning related stepwise progresses. Expanding the evolutionary prototyping to 'start small and grow', the organic view of prototyping proposes two prerequisites ...


Measurement of vital sign in chick embryo using multi-channel diffuse speckle contrast analysis

C. B. Yeo; H. C. Park; K. J. Lee; C. Song 2015 37th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC), 2015

In poultry industry which is avian breeding program, the determination whether chick embryos survive in the artificial incubation periods or not is essential to reduce the financial resources. We developed the multi-channel diffuse speckle contrast analysis (DSCA) system composed of four optical fiber detectors enabling to achieve in-vivo measurements of deep tissue flow noninvasively. The system could confirm vital sign ...


Maintenance of Sea-Floor Electronics

Victor C. Anderson IEEE Transactions on Aerospace and Electronic Systems, 1968

This paper discusses some of the present developments in in situ electronics maintenance by the use of divers and by remote manipulators, and relates the effect of these developments to the operating cost of future sea-floor instrumentation systems.


Functional Common-Path Fourier-domain OCT for hemoglobin oxygen saturation imaging

Jin U. Kang; Xuan Liu 2009 Asia Communications and Photonics conference and Exhibition (ACP), 2009

We propose and analyze functional Common-Path Fourier-domain Optical Coherence Tomography (CP-FDOCT) for providing localized and quantitative estimation of hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SO2) level in tissue. Result using a chicken embryo in vivo is presented.


"LMITs" - Load Management Innovative Techniques

IEEE Transactions on Power Apparatus and Systems, 1984

This paper is one of a series for use in "LMITs" (Load Management Innovative Techniques) forums. The goal. of these forums i. s to focus attention on new load management techniques being developed by utilities. In particular, it is intended to highlight innovative techniques so as to foster interest and discussion by IEEE members in new ideas in this rapidly ...


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Educational Resources on Embryo

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eLearning

An Organic View of Prototyping in Information System Development

Guohua Bai 2014 IEEE 17th International Conference on Computational Science and Engineering, 2014

This paper presents an organic view of prototyping for managing dynamic factors involved in evolutionary design of information systems (IS). Those dynamic factors can be caused by, for example, continuing suggestions from users, changes in the technologies, and users-designers learning related stepwise progresses. Expanding the evolutionary prototyping to 'start small and grow', the organic view of prototyping proposes two prerequisites ...


Measurement of vital sign in chick embryo using multi-channel diffuse speckle contrast analysis

C. B. Yeo; H. C. Park; K. J. Lee; C. Song 2015 37th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC), 2015

In poultry industry which is avian breeding program, the determination whether chick embryos survive in the artificial incubation periods or not is essential to reduce the financial resources. We developed the multi-channel diffuse speckle contrast analysis (DSCA) system composed of four optical fiber detectors enabling to achieve in-vivo measurements of deep tissue flow noninvasively. The system could confirm vital sign ...


Maintenance of Sea-Floor Electronics

Victor C. Anderson IEEE Transactions on Aerospace and Electronic Systems, 1968

This paper discusses some of the present developments in in situ electronics maintenance by the use of divers and by remote manipulators, and relates the effect of these developments to the operating cost of future sea-floor instrumentation systems.


Functional Common-Path Fourier-domain OCT for hemoglobin oxygen saturation imaging

Jin U. Kang; Xuan Liu 2009 Asia Communications and Photonics conference and Exhibition (ACP), 2009

We propose and analyze functional Common-Path Fourier-domain Optical Coherence Tomography (CP-FDOCT) for providing localized and quantitative estimation of hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SO2) level in tissue. Result using a chicken embryo in vivo is presented.


"LMITs" - Load Management Innovative Techniques

IEEE Transactions on Power Apparatus and Systems, 1984

This paper is one of a series for use in "LMITs" (Load Management Innovative Techniques) forums. The goal. of these forums i. s to focus attention on new load management techniques being developed by utilities. In particular, it is intended to highlight innovative techniques so as to foster interest and discussion by IEEE members in new ideas in this rapidly ...


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IEEE.tv Videos

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IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Index

    After a decade and a half, human pluripotent stem cell research has been normalized. There may be no consensus on the status of the embryo -- only a tacit agreement to disagree -- but the debate now takes place in a context in which human stem cell research and related technologies already exist. In this book, Charis Thompson investigates the evolution of the controversy over human pluripotent stem cell research in the United States and proposes a new ethical approach for "good science." Thompson traces political, ethical, and scientific developments that came together in what she characterizes as a "procurial" framing of innovation, based on concern with procurement of pluripotent cells and cell lines, a pro-cures mandate, and a proliferation of bio-curatorial practices. Thompson describes what she calls the "ethical choreography" that allowed research to go on as the controversy continued. The intense ethical attention led to some important discoveries as scientists attempted to "invent around" ethical roadblocks. Some ethical concerns were highly legible; but others were hard to raise in the dominant procurial framing that allowed government funding for the practice of stem cell research to proceed despite controversy. Thompson broadens the debate to include such related topics as animal and human research subjecthood and altruism. Looking at fifteen years of stem cell debate and discoveries, Thompson argues that good science and good ethics are mutually reinforcing, rather than antithetical, in contemporary biomedicine.

  • Thinking of Other Lives

    After a decade and a half, human pluripotent stem cell research has been normalized. There may be no consensus on the status of the embryo -- only a tacit agreement to disagree -- but the debate now takes place in a context in which human stem cell research and related technologies already exist. In this book, Charis Thompson investigates the evolution of the controversy over human pluripotent stem cell research in the United States and proposes a new ethical approach for "good science." Thompson traces political, ethical, and scientific developments that came together in what she characterizes as a "procurial" framing of innovation, based on concern with procurement of pluripotent cells and cell lines, a pro-cures mandate, and a proliferation of bio-curatorial practices. Thompson describes what she calls the "ethical choreography" that allowed research to go on as the controversy continued. The intense ethical attention led to some important discoveries as scientists attempted to "invent around" ethical roadblocks. Some ethical concerns were highly legible; but others were hard to raise in the dominant procurial framing that allowed government funding for the practice of stem cell research to proceed despite controversy. Thompson broadens the debate to include such related topics as animal and human research subjecthood and altruism. Looking at fifteen years of stem cell debate and discoveries, Thompson argues that good science and good ethics are mutually reinforcing, rather than antithetical, in contemporary biomedicine.

  • Stem Cell Geopolitics

    After a decade and a half, human pluripotent stem cell research has been normalized. There may be no consensus on the status of the embryo -- only a tacit agreement to disagree -- but the debate now takes place in a context in which human stem cell research and related technologies already exist. In this book, Charis Thompson investigates the evolution of the controversy over human pluripotent stem cell research in the United States and proposes a new ethical approach for "good science." Thompson traces political, ethical, and scientific developments that came together in what she characterizes as a "procurial" framing of innovation, based on concern with procurement of pluripotent cells and cell lines, a pro-cures mandate, and a proliferation of bio-curatorial practices. Thompson describes what she calls the "ethical choreography" that allowed research to go on as the controversy continued. The intense ethical attention led to some important discoveries as scientists attempted to "invent around" ethical roadblocks. Some ethical concerns were highly legible; but others were hard to raise in the dominant procurial framing that allowed government funding for the practice of stem cell research to proceed despite controversy. Thompson broadens the debate to include such related topics as animal and human research subjecthood and altruism. Looking at fifteen years of stem cell debate and discoveries, Thompson argues that good science and good ethics are mutually reinforcing, rather than antithetical, in contemporary biomedicine.

  • References

    After a decade and a half, human pluripotent stem cell research has been normalized. There may be no consensus on the status of the embryo -- only a tacit agreement to disagree -- but the debate now takes place in a context in which human stem cell research and related technologies already exist. In this book, Charis Thompson investigates the evolution of the controversy over human pluripotent stem cell research in the United States and proposes a new ethical approach for "good science." Thompson traces political, ethical, and scientific developments that came together in what she characterizes as a "procurial" framing of innovation, based on concern with procurement of pluripotent cells and cell lines, a pro-cures mandate, and a proliferation of bio-curatorial practices. Thompson describes what she calls the "ethical choreography" that allowed research to go on as the controversy continued. The intense ethical attention led to some important discoveries as scientists attempted to "invent around" ethical roadblocks. Some ethical concerns were highly legible; but others were hard to raise in the dominant procurial framing that allowed government funding for the practice of stem cell research to proceed despite controversy. Thompson broadens the debate to include such related topics as animal and human research subjecthood and altruism. Looking at fifteen years of stem cell debate and discoveries, Thompson argues that good science and good ethics are mutually reinforcing, rather than antithetical, in contemporary biomedicine.

  • NanoNewton Force Sensing and Control in Microrobotic Cell Manipulation

    Cellular force sensing and control techniques are capable of enhancing the dexterity and reliability of microrobotic cell manipulation systems. This paper presents a vision-based cellular force sensing technique using a microfabricated elastic cell holding device and a sub-pixel visual tracking algorithm for resolving forces down to 3.7nN during microrobotic mouse embryo injection. The technique also experimentally proves useful for in situ differentiation of healthy mouse embryos from those with compromised developmental competence without the requirement of a separate mechanical characterization process. Concerning force-controlled microrobotic cell manipulation (pick-transport-place), this paper presents the first demonstration of nanoNewton force-controlled cell micrograsping using a MEMS- based microgripper with integrated two-axis force feedback. On-chip force sensors are used for detecting contact between the microgripper and cells to be manipulated (resolution: 38.5nN) and sensing gripping forces (resolution: 19.9nN) during force-controlled grasping. The experimental results demonstrate that the microgripper and the control system are capable of rapid contact detection and reliable force-controlled micrograsping to accommodate variations in size and stiffness of cells with a high reproducibility.

  • Analyzing Gene Expression Imaging Data in Developmental Biology

    This chapter describes the application of data-intensive methods to the automatic identification and annotation of gene expression patterns in the mouse embryo. The first section of the chapter introduces ideas behind modern computational and systems biology, how the explosion of data in the postgenomic world has led to new possibilities and even greater challenges. The second section talks about the particular computational biology problem and describes annotating images of gene expression with the right anatomical terms in depth. An automated solution based on data-intensive methods is discussed the third section. The final section looks ahead to the biological significance and systems biology application of these approaches and also describes a large-scale challenge and possible series of experiments with a novel data-intensive computational architecture.

  • Stem Cell Biopolitics

    After a decade and a half, human pluripotent stem cell research has been normalized. There may be no consensus on the status of the embryo -- only a tacit agreement to disagree -- but the debate now takes place in a context in which human stem cell research and related technologies already exist. In this book, Charis Thompson investigates the evolution of the controversy over human pluripotent stem cell research in the United States and proposes a new ethical approach for "good science." Thompson traces political, ethical, and scientific developments that came together in what she characterizes as a "procurial" framing of innovation, based on concern with procurement of pluripotent cells and cell lines, a pro-cures mandate, and a proliferation of bio-curatorial practices. Thompson describes what she calls the "ethical choreography" that allowed research to go on as the controversy continued. The intense ethical attention led to some important discoveries as scientists attempted to "invent around" ethical roadblocks. Some ethical concerns were highly legible; but others were hard to raise in the dominant procurial framing that allowed government funding for the practice of stem cell research to proceed despite controversy. Thompson broadens the debate to include such related topics as animal and human research subjecthood and altruism. Looking at fifteen years of stem cell debate and discoveries, Thompson argues that good science and good ethics are mutually reinforcing, rather than antithetical, in contemporary biomedicine.

  • Appendix B Resources and Primary Documents for Stem Cell Research Involving Embryo(ID) Potential Subjects, and Selected Text

    General resources, Primary texts, Selected texts

  • Appendix A Glossary

    After a decade and a half, human pluripotent stem cell research has been normalized. There may be no consensus on the status of the embryo -- only a tacit agreement to disagree -- but the debate now takes place in a context in which human stem cell research and related technologies already exist. In this book, Charis Thompson investigates the evolution of the controversy over human pluripotent stem cell research in the United States and proposes a new ethical approach for "good science." Thompson traces political, ethical, and scientific developments that came together in what she characterizes as a "procurial" framing of innovation, based on concern with procurement of pluripotent cells and cell lines, a pro-cures mandate, and a proliferation of bio-curatorial practices. Thompson describes what she calls the "ethical choreography" that allowed research to go on as the controversy continued. The intense ethical attention led to some important discoveries as scientists attempted to "invent around" ethical roadblocks. Some ethical concerns were highly legible; but others were hard to raise in the dominant procurial framing that allowed government funding for the practice of stem cell research to proceed despite controversy. Thompson broadens the debate to include such related topics as animal and human research subjecthood and altruism. Looking at fifteen years of stem cell debate and discoveries, Thompson argues that good science and good ethics are mutually reinforcing, rather than antithetical, in contemporary biomedicine.

  • Epilogue

    After a decade and a half, human pluripotent stem cell research has been normalized. There may be no consensus on the status of the embryo -- only a tacit agreement to disagree -- but the debate now takes place in a context in which human stem cell research and related technologies already exist. In this book, Charis Thompson investigates the evolution of the controversy over human pluripotent stem cell research in the United States and proposes a new ethical approach for "good science." Thompson traces political, ethical, and scientific developments that came together in what she characterizes as a "procurial" framing of innovation, based on concern with procurement of pluripotent cells and cell lines, a pro-cures mandate, and a proliferation of bio-curatorial practices. Thompson describes what she calls the "ethical choreography" that allowed research to go on as the controversy continued. The intense ethical attention led to some important discoveries as scientists attempted to "invent around" ethical roadblocks. Some ethical concerns were highly legible; but others were hard to raise in the dominant procurial framing that allowed government funding for the practice of stem cell research to proceed despite controversy. Thompson broadens the debate to include such related topics as animal and human research subjecthood and altruism. Looking at fifteen years of stem cell debate and discoveries, Thompson argues that good science and good ethics are mutually reinforcing, rather than antithetical, in contemporary biomedicine.



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