Conferences related to Earthquakes

Back to Top

2016 IEEE International Symposium on Antennas and Propagation & USNC/URSI National Radio Science Meeting

This is the annual symposium for the IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society, and it is joint with the US National Committee of URSI's Radio Science Meeting.

  • 2015 IEEE International Symposium on Antennas and Propagation & USNC/URSI National Radio Science Meeting

    The joint meeting is intended to provide an international forum for the exchange of information on state of-the-art research in the areas of antennas, propagation, electromagnetic engineering, and radio science.

  • 2014 IEEE International Symposium on Antennas and Propagation & USNC/URSI National Radio Science Meeting

    The joint meeting is intended to provide an international forum for the exchange of information on state of-the-art research in the areas of antennas, propagation, electromagnetic engineering, and radio science. Technical sessions will be held over a four-day period and workshops and short courses will occur on two days.

  • 2013 IEEE International Symposium on Antennas and Propagation & USNC/URSI National Radio Science Meeting

    The Symposium serves as the premier international forum for the exchange of information on state-of-the-art research in antennas, electromagnetic- wave propagation, radio science, and electromagnetic engineering.

  • 2012 IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society International Symposium and USNC/URSI National Radio Science Meeting

    This conference covers all areas relating to antenna theory, design and practice: propagation, including theory, effects and system considerations; analytical and computational electromagnetics, scattering, diffraction, and radar cross sections; and applications pertaining to antennas and propagation, such as remote sensing, applied optics, millimeter and submillimeter wave techniques, telecommunications, broadcasting, electromagnetic effects on biological tissue.

  • 2011 IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society International Symposium and USNC/URSI National Radio Science Meeting

    This meeting is intended to provide an international forum for the exchange of information on state-of-the-art research in antennas, propagation, and electromagnetic engineering.

  • 2010 IEEE International Symposium Antennas and Propagation and CNC/USNC/URSI Radio Science Meeting

    This is the premier annual conference on Antennas and Propagation, electromagnetics and radio science.

  • 2009 IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society International Symposium and USNC/URSI National Radio Science Meeting

    This joint meeting is co-sponsored by the IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society (AP-S) and USNC-URSI Commissions A, B, C, D, E, F and K. Technical sessions (June 1-5), workshops and short courses (May 31 & June 6) are offered to provide a comprehensive and well balanced program. This meeting provides an international forum for the exchange of information on state-of-the-art research in antennas, propagation, and electromagnetic engineering.

  • 2008 IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society International Symposium and USNC/URSI National Radio Science Meeting

    This meeting is intended to provide an international forum for the exchange of information on state-of-the-art research in antennas, propagation, and electromagnetic engineering.

  • 2007 IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society International Symposium

  • 2006 IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society International Symposium and URSI National Radio Science Meeting


OCEANS 2016

The Marine Technology Scociety and the Oceanic Engineering Society of the IEEE cosponor a joint annual conference and exposition on ocean science, engineering, and policy. The OCEANS conference covers four days. One day for tutorials and three for approx. 500 technical papers and 150 -200 exhibits.

  • OCEANS 2015

    The Marine Technology Scociety and the Oceanic Engineering Society of the IEEE cosponor a joint annual conference and exposition on ocean science, engineering, and policy. The OCEANS conference covers four days. One day for tutorials and three for approx. 450 technical papers and 150-200 exhibits.

  • OCEANS 2014

    The OCEANS conference covers four days. One day for tutorials and three for approx. 450 technical papers and 150-200 exhibits.

  • OCEANS 2013

    Three days of 8-10 tracks of technical sessions (400-450 papers) and concurent exhibition (150-250 exhibitors)

  • OCEANS 2012

    Ocean related technology. Tutorials and three days of technical sessions and exhibits. 8-12 parallel technical tracks.

  • OCEANS 2011

    The Marine Technology Society and the Oceanic Engineering Scociety of the IEEE cosponsor a joint annual conference and exposition on ocean science engineering, and policy.

  • OCEANS 2010

    The Marine Technology Society and the Oceanic Engineering Scociety of the IEEE cosponsor a joint annual conference and exposition on ocean science engineering, and policy.


OCEANS 2014 - TAIPEI

The OCEANS conference covers all aspects of ocean engineering from physics aspects through development and operation of undersea vehicles and equipment.


2013 IEEE International Underwater Technology Symposium (UT)

UT13 continues a series of symposia focusing on the emerging technologies for underwater applications. The topics includes the continuous and real-time underwater observation systems, the underwater vehicles, the sensors and sensor networks for oceanic surveys, and the ocean acoustics and robotic technologies.

  • 2011 Symposium on Underwater Technology (UT) and Workshop on Scientific Use of Submarine Cables and Related Technologies (SSC)

    This conference will feature advanced underwater technology and scientific use of submarine cables & related technologies. Suggested topics are Underwater Vehicles and Robotics, Underwater Acoustics, Bio-Sonar, Signal and Information Processing, Underwater Observation Systems, Submarine Cables and Connected Observatories, Underwater Sensors, Geo Scientific Measurement and Underwater Construction.

  • 2009 IEEE/OES 6th International Symposium on Underwater Technology (UT)

    UT2009 will provide an invaluable forum for the exchange of information between those involved in the development of underwater technology in the world.

  • 2007 Symposium on Underwater Technology (UT) and Workshop on Scientific Use of Submarine Cables and Related Technologies (SSC)

    This conference will feature advanced underwater technology and scientific use of submarine cables & related technologies. Suggested topics are Underwater Vehicles and Robotics, Underwater Acoustics, Bio-Sonar, Signal and Information Processing, Underwater Observation Systems, Submarine Cables and Connected Observatories, Underwater Sensors, Geo Scientific Measurement and Underwater Construction.


SICE 2012 - 51st Annual Conference of the Society of Instrument and Control Engineers of Japan

This conference covers a wide range of fields from measurement and control to system analysis and design, from theory to application and from software to hardware.


More Conferences

Periodicals related to Earthquakes

Back to Top

Computing in Science & Engineering

Physics, medicine, astronomy—these and other hard sciences share a common need for efficient algorithms, system software, and computer architecture to address large computational problems. And yet, useful advances in computational techniques that could benefit many researchers are rarely shared. To meet that need, Computing in Science & Engineering (CiSE) presents scientific and computational contributions in a clear and accessible format. ...


Instrumentation & Measurement Magazine, IEEE

Applications-oriented material in the field of instrumentation and measurement.


Knowledge and Data Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Artificial intelligence techniques, including speech, voice, graphics, images, and documents; knowledge and data engineering tools and techniques; parallel and distributed processing; real-time distributed processing; system architectures, integration, and modeling; database design, modeling, and management; query design, and implementation languages; distributed database control; statistical databases; algorithms for data and knowledge management; performance evaluation of algorithms and systems; data communications aspects; system ...


Nuclear Science, IEEE Transactions on

All aspects of the theory and applications of nuclear science and engineering, including instrumentation for the detection and measurement of ionizing radiation; particle accelerators and their controls; nuclear medicine and its application; effects of radiation on materials, components, and systems; reactor instrumentation and controls; and measurement of radiation in space.


Power Delivery, IEEE Transactions on

Research, development, design, application, construction, the installation and operation of apparatus, equipment, structures, materials, and systems for the safe, reliable, and economic delivery and control of electric energy for general industrial, commercial, public, and domestic consumption.


More Periodicals


Xplore Articles related to Earthquakes

Back to Top

Assessing casualty densities based on sensor reports pursuant to a large-scale disaster

C. Donald Robinson; D. E. Brown 2005 IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man and Cybernetics, 2005

One of the newest innovations which are making its way more prevalently into the field of emergency response is information technology. Information technology (IT), in this sense, seeks to turn relevant data into usable information to aid in an emergency response. One of the key elements to useful beneficial IT is to quickly, accurately, and dynamically turn incoming data into ...


Mechanical properties of load-bearing beam with tree root type steel-concrete structure

Wenxue Wang; Hui Tang; Shanshan Hao 2012 7th International Forum on Strategic Technology (IFOST), 2012

In traditional design of anti-seismic steel-concrete structure, the strength of steel-concrete directly affected the shear capacity of load-bearing beam frame joints. The interfacial size and shear interface of the load-bearing beam decreased with the increasing of the steel-concrete strength when the joints were under a certain load. It was unfavorable to anti-seismic ability under a certain stirrup ratio. To solve ...


Dynamic Web Map Service for Web Publishing System of Mass Remote Sensing Images

F. Zhao; J. Zhang; D. Cao 2006 IEEE International Symposium on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, 2006

This dynamic Web map service, a key technique in systematical structures of Internet mapping, is presented in implementing Web publishing system of mass remote sensing images. Dynamic Eeb map service enhances the flexibility of establishing various online map services. Dynamic Web map service provides a powerful Internet mapping solution, with the ability to present, link, distribute and publish geomatics-based data ...


P phase and S phase detection using the Daubechies Wavelet Transform (DWT) to minimize the noise at three component seismograms displacement records

O. H. Colak; T. C. Destici; S. Ozen; O. Cerezci; N. Arı 2005 13th European Signal Processing Conference, 2005

The wavelet transform is one of the important methods that are used to minimize noises and to analyze signals. The choice of wavelet and its associated scaling function are very important to obtain the most useful wavelet transforms. In the present work, it was investigated that the easy obtaining of the P and S phases by minimizing the noise at ...


Approximate minimal connected cover dominate set in sensor networks based on Cartesian code

Jie Zheng; Jianping Li 2013 10th International Computer Conference on Wavelet Active Media Technology and Information Processing (ICCWAMTIP), 2013

As a kind of wireless ad hoc network model, Sensor network has broad application prospects in environment, Military control, the Prediction of earthquake and climate and so on. Based on the functional of density control of Sensor Networks, a construction algorithm called Connected Cover Dominate Set has been proposed. In the new algorithm, the Sink node set up Cartesian code ...


More Xplore Articles

Educational Resources on Earthquakes

Back to Top

eLearning

Assessing casualty densities based on sensor reports pursuant to a large-scale disaster

C. Donald Robinson; D. E. Brown 2005 IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man and Cybernetics, 2005

One of the newest innovations which are making its way more prevalently into the field of emergency response is information technology. Information technology (IT), in this sense, seeks to turn relevant data into usable information to aid in an emergency response. One of the key elements to useful beneficial IT is to quickly, accurately, and dynamically turn incoming data into ...


Mechanical properties of load-bearing beam with tree root type steel-concrete structure

Wenxue Wang; Hui Tang; Shanshan Hao 2012 7th International Forum on Strategic Technology (IFOST), 2012

In traditional design of anti-seismic steel-concrete structure, the strength of steel-concrete directly affected the shear capacity of load-bearing beam frame joints. The interfacial size and shear interface of the load-bearing beam decreased with the increasing of the steel-concrete strength when the joints were under a certain load. It was unfavorable to anti-seismic ability under a certain stirrup ratio. To solve ...


Dynamic Web Map Service for Web Publishing System of Mass Remote Sensing Images

F. Zhao; J. Zhang; D. Cao 2006 IEEE International Symposium on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, 2006

This dynamic Web map service, a key technique in systematical structures of Internet mapping, is presented in implementing Web publishing system of mass remote sensing images. Dynamic Eeb map service enhances the flexibility of establishing various online map services. Dynamic Web map service provides a powerful Internet mapping solution, with the ability to present, link, distribute and publish geomatics-based data ...


P phase and S phase detection using the Daubechies Wavelet Transform (DWT) to minimize the noise at three component seismograms displacement records

O. H. Colak; T. C. Destici; S. Ozen; O. Cerezci; N. Arı 2005 13th European Signal Processing Conference, 2005

The wavelet transform is one of the important methods that are used to minimize noises and to analyze signals. The choice of wavelet and its associated scaling function are very important to obtain the most useful wavelet transforms. In the present work, it was investigated that the easy obtaining of the P and S phases by minimizing the noise at ...


Approximate minimal connected cover dominate set in sensor networks based on Cartesian code

Jie Zheng; Jianping Li 2013 10th International Computer Conference on Wavelet Active Media Technology and Information Processing (ICCWAMTIP), 2013

As a kind of wireless ad hoc network model, Sensor network has broad application prospects in environment, Military control, the Prediction of earthquake and climate and so on. Based on the functional of density control of Sensor Networks, a construction algorithm called Connected Cover Dominate Set has been proposed. In the new algorithm, the Sink node set up Cartesian code ...


More eLearning Resources

IEEE.tv Videos

No IEEE.tv Videos are currently tagged "Earthquakes"

IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Group Report: Fluids, Geochemical Cycles, and Mass Transport in Fault Zones

    This chapter contains sections titled: Overview, Theme 1: What are The Controls on Fluid-Rock Chemical Interaction in and Adjacent to Fault Zones?, Theme 2: How Does Fluid Flow Change Before, During, and After Earthquakes?, Theme 3: What are the Magnitudes of Fluid Flux Throughout the Lithosphere in Different Tectonic Environments?, Summary, References

  • Application of Evolutionary Programming To Earthquake Hypocenter Determination

    As models of seismic velocity in the Earth's crust are refined to accommodate larger and better data sets, they tend to become locally "rough" where they are best resolved, with nonplanar interfaces, and complex structures. This means that perturbation techniques which rely on differentiability of travel- times with respect to source coordinates are likely to fail, or to give erroneous results with little evidence that the answer is wrong. With even relatively simple three-dimensional structures involving dipping discontinuities, correct identification of seismic arrivals--or "phases"--can be problematic, and precise event locations elusive. We investigate the applicability of evolutionary programming to this problem and conclude that it yields satisfactory results, provided that no gross errors are present in the observations. Realistic applications to routine locations of earthquakes in a three-dimensional crustal model call for an effective ray tracing and travel time calculation strategy.

  • Deformation in the Presence of Fluids and Mineral Reactions

    Natural and experimental deformation of fault rocks show that fluid flow and mineral reactions are linked to fracturing in a nonlinear feedback relationship that potentially affects the displacement and stress histories of large faults. These interactions spawn instabilities that are expressed as episodic seismic events involving cataclasis, which alternate with slow, aseismic deformation involving pressure-solution creep, as well as healing and sealing by fluid-assisted mass transfer. This chapter focuses on the timescale of these processes during the earthquake cycle, with special emphasis on the evolution of rheological and transport properties of fault rock during the interseismic period. Fracturing weakens faults dramatically by enhancing the kinetics of pressure-solution creep and of mineral reactions. Therefore, during the postseismic period and initial part of the interseismic period, weakening is faster than fault strengthening by healing and sealing of fractures. During the interseismic period, mass transfer associated with fluid-assisted chemical reactions smoothes asperities on fault surfaces, heals fractures and enhances the formation of a foliation parallel to the fault plane, and decreases permeability. If advective fluid inflow is significant, this can increase pore-fluid pressure and reduce effective shear strength, at least locally within the fault. In the long term, however, the combined effect of fracturing, pressure-solution creep, and sealing is to restore the rheological and transport properties of the fault during the interseismic period, setting the stage for renewed stress build-up and seismicity. We demonstrate the salient characteristics of fluid-assisted fault weakening and strengthening with a one-dimensional model of an idealized fault zone undergoing simple shear at constant velocity. The model shows that the kinetics of the weakening a nd strengthening processes determine the relative rates of shear stress decrease and increase during the interseismic period. The kinetics of dissolution precipitation and mineral reactions are therefore expected to exert an important control on the recurrence time of earthquakes.

  • Constraining the Denudational Response to Faulting

    Denudation links tectonics with climate by changing topographic loads and promoting the drawdown of CO2. Measurements of denudation are a key to understanding this link. In particular, they are required to test and calibrate geodynamic models, to evaluate the tectonic control on landscape evolution, to quantify the geomorphic impact of faulting and seismicity, and to assess the role of tectonically driven denudation in stabilizing Earth's climate. We review techniques used to measure denudation, and weathering on timescales relevant to faulting and the dynamics of fault zones, with particular attention paid to the use of hydrometric data and cosmogenic isotopes. Using selected examples, we illustrate the application of these techniques to problems ranging from soil formation and coseismic erosion of earthquake epicentral areas to the erosion of orogens and estimation of catchment-scale erosion and weathering fluxes. The examples show that faulting is the Earth's premier erosion and weathering engine. Globally, erosion scales with tectonic forcing. Locally, fluvial incision and landscape lowering are correlated with faulting and seismic activity. Thus, tectonically active areas yield disproportionate amounts of sediment. Erosion refreshes rock surfaces in these areas, thereby enhancing chemical weathering rates and CO2 consumption. The effects of climate variability and change are evident in the patterns and rates of erosion and weathering. However, they are almost always superimposed on a stronger tectonic signal. We highlight the potential of cosmogenic nuclides to quantify present and past rates and patterns of denudation associated with faulting. Finally, we identify outstanding challenges for future work: (a) to characterize crustal deformation, climate, and denudation over their full range of time and length scales; (b) to analyze the geomorphic imp act and stratigraphic record of recent earthquakes; (c) to identify the processes, thresholds, and feedback mechanisms that control global weathering and regulate the long-term climate; and (d) to provide constraints that help to mitigate the risks associated with geomorphic processes triggered by earthquakes. Constraining the denudational response to faulting will help to meet these challenges.

  • Controlling Civil Infrastructures

    Controls is well-established in most of the major engineering disciplines- electrical, chemical, mechanical, aerospace. Historically, an important exception has been civil engineering, and, as this chapter illustrates, recent developments are bridging the gap. The importance of understanding the dynamics of civil structures has been recognized since the 1940 Tacoma Narrows bridge collapse, but feedback control of buildings, bridges, towers, and other structures is a relatively recent development. The concept of active control for such systems was first introduced in 1972. Since then, a vast literature has been generated on the topic, and, more impressively, a number of successful implementations have been completed (the first full-scale one in 1989). Many of the largest applications have been to buildings in Japan, driven by the desire to achieve protection against earthquakes. The first implementation of structural control was based on active mass dampers (AMDs). An AMD system couples an auxiliary mass to the structure through an actuator. Sensor measurements of building movement and stresses are used in a control algorithm to move the auxiliary mass relative to the building. Such systems are versatile and capable, but issues of reliability and power consumption have driven the search for improvements. The next significant development was controllers that employed a combination of active and passive devices. These hybrid active/passive control systems (no relationship to the hybrid discrete/continuous systems discussed in Chapter 7) rely on one of two approaches: hybrid mass damping and hybrid base isolation. The former is especially popular. The largest building in Japan, the Yokohama Landmark Tower, incorporates two hybrid mass dampers (HMDs), each weighing 170 tons. The most recent innovation is the semiactive control device. These devices cannot i nject mechanical energy into the structure but have properties that can be manipulated to achieve structural disturbance rejection. In many cases, they can operate on battery power; this is a significant advantage since seismic events can interrupt main power supplies. Examples of semiactive devices include variable-orifice fluid dampers, variable-stiffness devices, variable-friction devices, controllable and tuned liquid dampers, and magnetorheological dampers. The last topic is discussed at some length in this chapter, and experimental results are shown.

  • Planetary Energetics: Atmosphere, Hydrosphere, Lithosphere

    This chapter contains sections titled: Sun: The Star and Its Radiation, Energy Balance of the Earth: Radiation Fluxes, Hydrosphere and Atmosphere: Thermal and Mass Fluxes, Water and Air in Motion: Kinetic Fluxes, Geoenergetics: Heat, Plate Tectonics, Volcanoes, Earthquakes

  • Strain Localization within Fault Arrays over Timescales of 100-107 Years

    Statistical characterization of fault networks, combined with an analysis of geodetic data and the location of historical earthquakes, is a method commonly used to quantify the degree of strain localization in a given tectonic setting. However, such analyses do not address the fundamental questions of why, how, and when (i.e., after what percent total strain) does localization occur on a lithospheric scale. Many studies suggest that the initial phase of crustal deformation is characterized by distributed strain accumulation and structural complexity and that the system evolves towards highly localized deformation on a small number of discrete fault zones. What controls the transition from one regime to the other within a rheologically layered lithosphere? Observations of the evolution of fault networks over a range of spatial and temporal scales may help us to understand the underlying controls on the localization process. Dip-slip faults, especially moderate to high- angle extensional structures, inherently provide the best conditions for preserving such temporal information over geological time because they generate adjacent sedimentary depocenters that usually remain undeformed by subsequent movement on the fault. The aim of this paper is (a) to review recent observations of extensional fault growth, (b) to summarize conclusions drawn from these observations concerning the underlying controls on strain localization in extensional settings, and (c) to discuss the relevance of these observations to other tectonic settings. In particular, several of the ideas that have been derived from studies of strain localization in extensional settings are used to reexamine existing theories concerning strike-slip fault evolution.

  • Discriminating Natural Earthquakes from Underground Nuclear Explosions

    This chapter contains sections titled: Motivation, Morphology, Background, Neural Network Discrimination, Performance of the Neural Network, Discussion, Summary, Exercises, References

  • Continental Fault Structure and Rheology from the Frictional-to-Viscous Transition Downward

    Faulting is an expression of the interaction between rock rheology, kinematic boundary conditions, and associated stress fields. The structure and rheology of faults vary with depth, such that pressure-dependent frictional behavior predominating in the upper, brittle part of the crust is transitional to strongly temperature- and rate-dependent behavior in the lower part of the crust and mantle. This frictional-to-viscous transition (FVT) is characterized by changes in rock structure, rheology, and fluid activity that are closely tied to the earthquake cycle. As such, the FVT is a first-order decoupling zone, whose depth and lateral extent vary in time. Brittle, sometimes seismic, instabilities perturb the ambient stress field within the lithosphere on timescales ranging from seconds to years. These instabilities are measurable as transient motions of the Earth's surface and are manifest both at, and below, the FVT by the development of structural anisotropies (fractures, foliations). Surface motion studies of plate-boundary strike-slip faults indicate that shearing below the FVT is more localized in the lower crust than in the upper mantle. Structural investigations of exhumed shear zones reveal that this localization involves the nucleation of fractures at the FVT, as well as the buckling and rotation of existing foliations below the FVT. In some cases, rotation of these surfaces can initiate transient deformation, transferring stress upward and potentially triggering earthquakes. The networking of shear zones on several length scales allows them to function as decoupling horizons that partition three-dimensional strain within the lithosphere. The simplification of fault geometry with progressive strain lends justification to the use of laboratory-derived flow laws to estimate the bulk rock rheology on length scales at which strain is homogeneous. In general, the longer the timeand length scales of faulting considered, the greater the potential influence of the kinematic and thermal history on the rheology of the fault system. Taken together, studies suggest that future fault modeling must include parameters that quantify the thermal and structural aspects of rock history, as well as the fluid activity in and around faults.

  • Forecasting or Early Warning of Earthquakes

    This chapter contains sections titled: Motivation, Morphology, Background, Seismicity Forecasting Using ANNS, Hayward Fault Seismicity, Synthetic Seismicity, Network Architecture, Earthquake Warning Systems, Summary, Exercises, References



Standards related to Earthquakes

Back to Top

No standards are currently tagged "Earthquakes"