DNA

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Deoxyribonucleic acid — DNA — is a nucleic acid that contains the genetic instructions used in the development and functioning of all known living organisms (with the exception of RNA viruses). The main role of DNA molecules is the long-term storage of information. (Wikipedia.org)






Conferences related to DNA

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2012 International Symposium on Micro-NanoMechatronics and Human Science (MHS)

The emphasis of this symposium is on fusions of several different fields and applications of micro-nano mechatronics technologies and human sciences. The symposium focus will be on engineering issues related to broader spectra, ranging from basic applications in robots, actuators, sensors, semiconductors, automobiles, and machine tools to new applications in biomedical systems and life sciences. The conference will feature Plenary, Invited, and Contributed papers (oral and poster sessions).

  • 2011 International Symposium on Micro-NanoMechatronics and Human Science (MHS)

    The emphasis of this symposium is on fusions of several different fields and applications of micro-nano mechatronics technologies and human sciences. The symposium focus will be on engineering issues related to broader spectra, ranging from basic applications in robots, actuators, sensors, semiconductors, automobiles, and machine tools to new applications in biomedical systems and life sciences. The conference will feature Plenary, Invited, and Contributed papers (oral and poster sessions).

  • 2010 International Symposium on Micro-NanoMechatronics and Human Science (MHS)

    The emphasis of this symposium is on fusions of several different fields and applications of micro-nano mechatronics technology and human sciences. The symposium focus will be on engineering issues related to broader spectra, ranging from basic applications in robots, actuators, sensors, semiconductors, automobiles, and machine tools to new applications in biomedical systems and life science. The conference will feature Plenary, Invited, and Contributed papers (oral and poster sessions).

  • 2009 International Symposium on Micro-NanoMechatronics and Human Science (MHS)

    The emphasis of this symposium is on fusions of several different fields and applications of micro-nano mechatronics technology and human sciences. The symposium focus will be on engineering issues related to broader spectra, ranging from basic applications in robots, actuators, sensors, semiconductors, automobiles, and machine tools to new applications in bio-medical systems and life science. The conference will feature Plenary, Invited, and Contributed papers (oral and poster sessions) thematically arrang

  • 2008 International Symposium on Micro-NanoMechatronics and Human Science (MHS)

    The emphasis of this symposium is on fusions of several different fields and applications of micro-nano mechatronics technology and human sciences. The symposium focus will be on engineering issues related to broader spectra, ranging from basic applications in robots, actuators, sensors, semiconductors, automobiles, and machine tools to new applications in bio-medical systems and life science. The conference will feature Plenary, Invited, and Contributed papers (oral and poster sessions) thematically arrang

  • 2007 International Symposium on Micro-NanoMechatronics and Human Science (MHS)

    The emphasis of this symposium is on fusions of several different fields and applications of micro-nano mechatronics technology and human sciences. The symposium focus will be on engineering issues related to broader spectra, ranging from basic applications in robots, actuators, sensors, semiconductors, automobiles, and machine tools to new applications in bio-medical systems and life science. The conference will feature Plenary, Invited and Contributed papers (oral and poster sessions) thematically arrange

  • 2006 IEEE International Symposium on Micro-NanoMechatronics and Human Science (MHS)

  • 2005 IEEE International Symposium on Micro-NanoMechatronics and Human Science (MHS)


TRANSDUCERS 2011 - 2011 16th International Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems Conference

Latest progress in physical, chemical and biological microsensors; Latest development in optical, RF, fluidic, biomedical and power MEMS; Most advanced technologies in micro/nano fabrication, packaging and design.


2009 IEEE International Conference on Electro/Information Technology (eit2009)

The 2009 Electro/Information Technology Conference, sponsored by the IEEE Region 4 (R4), is focused on basic/applied research results in the fields of electrical and computer engineering as they relate to Information Technology and its applications. The purpose of the conference is to provide a forum for researchers and industrial investigators to exchange ideas and discuss developments in this growing field.



Periodicals related to DNA

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Automation Science and Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

The IEEE Transactions on Automation Sciences and Engineering (T-ASE) publishes fundamental papers on Automation, emphasizing scientific results that advance efficiency, quality, productivity, and reliability. T-ASE encourages interdisciplinary approaches from computer science, control systems, electrical engineering, mathematics, mechanical engineering, operations research, and other fields. We welcome results relevant to industries such as agriculture, biotechnology, healthcare, home automation, maintenance, manufacturing, pharmaceuticals, retail, ...


Biomedical Circuits and Systems, IEEE Transactions on

The Transactions on Biomedical Circuits and Systems addresses areas at the crossroads of Circuits and Systems and Life Sciences. The main emphasis is on microelectronic issues in a wide range of applications found in life sciences, physical sciences and engineering. The primary goal of the journal is to bridge the unique scientific and technical activities of the Circuits and Systems ...


Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, IEEE/ACM Transactions on

Specific topics of interest include, but are not limited to, sequence analysis, comparison and alignment methods; motif, gene and signal recognition; molecular evolution; phylogenetics and phylogenomics; determination or prediction of the structure of RNA and Protein in two and three dimensions; DNA twisting and folding; gene expression and gene regulatory networks; deduction of metabolic pathways; micro-array design and analysis; proteomics; ...


Geoscience and Remote Sensing, IEEE Transactions on

Theory, concepts, and techniques of science and engineering as applied to sensing the earth, oceans, atmosphere, and space; and the processing, interpretation, and dissemination of this information.


Nanobioscience, IEEE Transactions on

Basic and applied papers dealing both with engineering, physics, chemistry, and computer science and with biology and medicine with respect to bio-molecules and cells. The content of acceptable papers ranges from practical/clinical/environmental applications to formalized mathematical theory. TAB #73-June 2001. (Original name-IEEE Transactions on Molecular Cellular and Tissue Engineering). T-NB publishes basic and applied research papers dealing with the study ...


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Xplore Articles related to DNA

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Micro-repetitive Structure of Genomic Sequences and the Identification of Ancient Repeat Elements

Abanish Singh; Cedric Feschotte; Nikola Stojanovic 2007 IEEE International Conference on Bioinformatics and Biomedicine (BIBM 2007), 2007

For many years the attempts to identify functional elements in genomic sequences through motif over- representation have been problematic, as every procedure to isolate such motifs resulted in a very large number of candidates with highly significant p-values. In this paper we postulate that most of these elements originate in ancient transpositional activity, with copies becoming so broken over time ...


Predicting Markov Chain Order in Genomic Sequences

Lenwood S. Heath; Amrita Pati 2007 IEEE International Conference on Bioinformatics and Biomedicine (BIBM 2007), 2007

Genomic sequences display characteristic features at various scales ranging from oligonucleotide frequencies to large organizational units such as genes. The generation of such a sequence, defined as a string over the alphabet SigmaDNA={A C, T, G}, can be approximated by a formal machine, a Markov chain having strings as states, whose parameters lend unique characteristics to the sequence. We present ...


Impact of electromagnetic radiation on human and animal cells: Approaches, results, perspectives

Yuriy G. Shckorbatov 2016 8th International Conference on Ultrawideband and Ultrashort Impulse Signals (UWBUSIS), 2016

cell answers to electromagnetic and magnetic fields are intensively investigated more than 50 years. In spite of huge amount of experimental data the general view on the problem depends of the personal point of view of investigator. Here we present main directions of investigation and most remarkable results of investigation of electromagnetic factors impact on cell in the last 5 ...


High throughput low cost electrochemical device for S.aureus bacteria detection

Mohammadali Safavieh; Minhaz Uddin Ahmed; Mohammed Zourob 2013 IEEE SENSORS, 2013

We present a novel roll-to-roll point of care (POC) diagnostic device that is easy to use, low cost to prepare, high throughput and can detect nucleic acids electrochemically in a real time manner. We first, demonstrate fabrication of the flexible ribbon. Then, the preparation of the device has been presented. The device has been used for detection of the real ...


An Unenumerative DNA Computing Model for Vertex Coloring Problem

Jin Xu; Xiaoli Qiang; Yan Yang; Baoju Wang; Dongliang Yang; Liang Luo; Linqiang Pan; Shudong Wang IEEE Transactions on NanoBioscience, 2011

The solution space exponential explosion caused by the enumeration of the candidate solutions maybe is the biggest obstacle in DNA computing. In the paper, a new unenumerative DNA computing model for graph vertex coloring problem is presented based on two techniques: 1) ordering the vertex sequence for a given graph in such a way that any two consecutive labeled vertices ...


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Educational Resources on DNA

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eLearning

Micro-repetitive Structure of Genomic Sequences and the Identification of Ancient Repeat Elements

Abanish Singh; Cedric Feschotte; Nikola Stojanovic 2007 IEEE International Conference on Bioinformatics and Biomedicine (BIBM 2007), 2007

For many years the attempts to identify functional elements in genomic sequences through motif over- representation have been problematic, as every procedure to isolate such motifs resulted in a very large number of candidates with highly significant p-values. In this paper we postulate that most of these elements originate in ancient transpositional activity, with copies becoming so broken over time ...


Predicting Markov Chain Order in Genomic Sequences

Lenwood S. Heath; Amrita Pati 2007 IEEE International Conference on Bioinformatics and Biomedicine (BIBM 2007), 2007

Genomic sequences display characteristic features at various scales ranging from oligonucleotide frequencies to large organizational units such as genes. The generation of such a sequence, defined as a string over the alphabet SigmaDNA={A C, T, G}, can be approximated by a formal machine, a Markov chain having strings as states, whose parameters lend unique characteristics to the sequence. We present ...


Impact of electromagnetic radiation on human and animal cells: Approaches, results, perspectives

Yuriy G. Shckorbatov 2016 8th International Conference on Ultrawideband and Ultrashort Impulse Signals (UWBUSIS), 2016

cell answers to electromagnetic and magnetic fields are intensively investigated more than 50 years. In spite of huge amount of experimental data the general view on the problem depends of the personal point of view of investigator. Here we present main directions of investigation and most remarkable results of investigation of electromagnetic factors impact on cell in the last 5 ...


High throughput low cost electrochemical device for S.aureus bacteria detection

Mohammadali Safavieh; Minhaz Uddin Ahmed; Mohammed Zourob 2013 IEEE SENSORS, 2013

We present a novel roll-to-roll point of care (POC) diagnostic device that is easy to use, low cost to prepare, high throughput and can detect nucleic acids electrochemically in a real time manner. We first, demonstrate fabrication of the flexible ribbon. Then, the preparation of the device has been presented. The device has been used for detection of the real ...


An Unenumerative DNA Computing Model for Vertex Coloring Problem

Jin Xu; Xiaoli Qiang; Yan Yang; Baoju Wang; Dongliang Yang; Liang Luo; Linqiang Pan; Shudong Wang IEEE Transactions on NanoBioscience, 2011

The solution space exponential explosion caused by the enumeration of the candidate solutions maybe is the biggest obstacle in DNA computing. In the paper, a new unenumerative DNA computing model for graph vertex coloring problem is presented based on two techniques: 1) ordering the vertex sequence for a given graph in such a way that any two consecutive labeled vertices ...


More eLearning Resources

IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Frontmatter

    This chapter contains sections titled: Half title, Title, Copyright, Dedication, Contents, Preface, Acknowledgments

  • Introduction

    Engineering has been an essential collaborator in biological research and breakthroughs in biology are often enabled by technological advances. Decoding the double helix structure of DNA, for example, only became possible after significant advances in such technologies as X-ray diffraction and gel electrophoresis. Diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis improved as new technologies -- including the stethoscope, the microscope, and the X-ray -- developed. These engineering breakthroughs take place away from the biology lab, and many years may elapse before the technology becomes available to biologists. In this book, David Lee argues for concurrent engineering -- the convergence of engineering and biological research -- as a means to accelerate the pace of biological discovery and its application to diagnosis and treatment. He presents extensive case studies and introduces a metric to measure the time between technological development and biological discovery.Investigating a series of major biological discoveries that range from pasteurization to electron microscopy, Lee finds that it took an average of forty years for the necessary technology to become available for laboratory use. Lee calls for new approaches to research and funding to encourage a tighter, more collaborative coupling of engineering and biology. Only then, he argues, will we see the rapid advances in the life sciences that are critically needed for life-saving diagnosis and treatment.

  • An Opportunity for Greater Discovery

    This chapter contains section titled: Engineering: Critical Research and Clinical Partner

  • Notes

    This chapter contains sections titled: Chapter 12, Chapter 13, Chapter 14, Chapter 16

  • Concurrent Engineering and Science

    This chapter contains sections titled: Engineering: The Dawn of Physics: From Mystery to Determinism, Engineering-Enabled Science: Quantum Physics, 1880-1930, The Start: X-Rays, Discovering the Nucleus of the Atom, Measuring the Charge of Electrons, Physics at Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, 1930 to Today, Engineering and Astrophysics: Creating the Hubble Space Telescope

  • References

    Engineering has been an essential collaborator in biological research and breakthroughs in biology are often enabled by technological advances. Decoding the double helix structure of DNA, for example, only became possible after significant advances in such technologies as X-ray diffraction and gel electrophoresis. Diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis improved as new technologies -- including the stethoscope, the microscope, and the X-ray -- developed. These engineering breakthroughs take place away from the biology lab, and many years may elapse before the technology becomes available to biologists. In this book, David Lee argues for concurrent engineering -- the convergence of engineering and biological research -- as a means to accelerate the pace of biological discovery and its application to diagnosis and treatment. He presents extensive case studies and introduces a metric to measure the time between technological development and biological discovery.Investigating a series of major biological discoveries that range from pasteurization to electron microscopy, Lee finds that it took an average of forty years for the necessary technology to become available for laboratory use. Lee calls for new approaches to research and funding to encourage a tighter, more collaborative coupling of engineering and biology. Only then, he argues, will we see the rapid advances in the life sciences that are critically needed for life-saving diagnosis and treatment.

  • Engineering and the Engineer

    This chapter contains sections titled: Engineering Defined, Concurrent Engineering and Biology, 1850-1880

  • Index

    Engineering has been an essential collaborator in biological research and breakthroughs in biology are often enabled by technological advances. Decoding the double helix structure of DNA, for example, only became possible after significant advances in such technologies as X-ray diffraction and gel electrophoresis. Diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis improved as new technologies -- including the stethoscope, the microscope, and the X-ray -- developed. These engineering breakthroughs take place away from the biology lab, and many years may elapse before the technology becomes available to biologists. In this book, David Lee argues for concurrent engineering -- the convergence of engineering and biological research -- as a means to accelerate the pace of biological discovery and its application to diagnosis and treatment. He presents extensive case studies and introduces a metric to measure the time between technological development and biological discovery.Investigating a series of major biological discoveries that range from pasteurization to electron microscopy, Lee finds that it took an average of forty years for the necessary technology to become available for laboratory use. Lee calls for new approaches to research and funding to encourage a tighter, more collaborative coupling of engineering and biology. Only then, he argues, will we see the rapid advances in the life sciences that are critically needed for life-saving diagnosis and treatment.

  • From Peas To Genome: Engineering-Enabled Biological Research

    Engineering has been an essential collaborator in biological research and breakthroughs in biology are often enabled by technological advances. Decoding the double helix structure of DNA, for example, only became possible after significant advances in such technologies as X-ray diffraction and gel electrophoresis. Diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis improved as new technologies -- including the stethoscope, the microscope, and the X-ray -- developed. These engineering breakthroughs take place away from the biology lab, and many years may elapse before the technology becomes available to biologists. In this book, David Lee argues for concurrent engineering -- the convergence of engineering and biological research -- as a means to accelerate the pace of biological discovery and its application to diagnosis and treatment. He presents extensive case studies and introduces a metric to measure the time between technological development and biological discovery.Investigating a series of major biological discoveries that range from pasteurization to electron microscopy, Lee finds that it took an average of forty years for the necessary technology to become available for laboratory use. Lee calls for new approaches to research and funding to encourage a tighter, more collaborative coupling of engineering and biology. Only then, he argues, will we see the rapid advances in the life sciences that are critically needed for life-saving diagnosis and treatment.

  • Discovery of Chromosomes and the Submicrometer Microscope

    This chapter contains sections titled: Mendel's Peas, 1866, The Early Biochemists, 1830-1890, Microscopy and the Discovery of Chromosomes, 1878, Pioneers of Light Spectroscopy



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