Concrete

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Concrete is a composite construction material, composed of cement and other cementitious materials such as fly ash and slag cement, aggregate (generally a coarse aggregate made of gravel or crushed rocks such as limestone, or granite, plus a fine aggregate such as sand), water and chemical admixtures. (Wikipedia.org)






Conferences related to Concrete

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2013 7th International Workshop on Advanced Ground Penetrating Radar (IWAGPR)

The International Workshop on Advanced Ground Penetrating Radar is a biannual series of international scientific symposia devoted to the advancements in GPR techniques and applications. Facing to challenges such as natural hazards or aging infrastructures, GPR is part of geophysical

  • 2012 14th International Conference on Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR)

    GPR2012 will share technical knowledge and experience in novel GPR systems and antennas, numerical modeling, data processing and interpretation, and applications in a variety of fields including agriculture, archaeology, sedimentology, hydrology, concrete/pavements, geology/geotechnical engineering, diagnostic of historical buildings, glaciology, mining and tunneling, utilities detection and mapping, planetary exploration, demining and UXO, etc.

  • 2011 6th International Workshop on Advanced Ground Penetrating Radar (IWAGPR 2011)

    Information Exchange about current research on Ground Penetrating Radar

  • 2010 13th International Conference on Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR)

    The conference presents a high standard of scientific and technical information to scientists, engineers and end-users of GPR technology. This information ranges from radar systems, antennas and imaging techniques to case studies and applications. The goal is to spread knowledge about GPR and provide an overview on recent advancements.


2012 50th Annual Allerton Conference on Communication, Control, and Computing (Allerton)

Papers presenting original research are solicited in the areas of communication systems, communication and computer networks, detection & estimation theory, and information theory.


2012 6th International Conference on Bioinformatics and Biomedical Engineering (iCBBE)

Bioinformatics, Computational Biology, Biomedical Engineering


2012 8th International Conference on Natural Computation (ICNC)

ICNC is an international forum on intelligent systems inspired from nature, particularly neural, biological, and nonlinear systems, with applications to signal processing, communications, biomedical engineering and more.

  • 2011 Seventh International Conference on Natural Computation (ICNC)

    ICNC is an international forum on intelligent systems inspired from nature, particularly neural, biological, and nonlinear systems, with applications to signal processing, communications, biomedical engineering, and more.

  • 2010 Sixth International Conference on Natural Computation (ICNC)

    ICNC is an international forum on intelligent systems inspired from nature, particularly neural, biological, and nonlinear systems, with applications to signal processing, communications, biomedical engineering, and more.

  • 2007 International Conference on Natural Computation (ICNC)

    ICNC '07 aims to provide a high-level international forum for scientists and researchers to present the state of the art of intelligent methods inspired from nature, including biological, ecological, and physical systems, with applications to data mining, manufacturing, design, reliability, and more. It is an exciting and emerging interdisciplinary area in which a wide range of techniques and methods are being studied for dealing with large, complex, and dynamic problems.


2012 IEEE International Conference on Condition Monitoring and Diagnosis (CMD)

Condition monitoring and diagnosis for power equipments and power systems,power plants, dielectric materials and their aging mechanisms, degradation assessment for power system, application of information and communication technologies for condition monitoring and diagnosis, tropical climate and other related issues including recycling, reuse and mitigation,strategic planning and management for condition monitoring and diagnosis.

  • 2008 International Conference on Condition Monitoring and Diagnosis (CMD)

    Condition Monitoring and Diagnosis for Power Plants Condition Monitoring and Diagnosis of HV Power Apparatus and Power System Electrical, Mechanical, Thermal and Chemical Failure Phenomena Dielectric Materials Aging and Failure Mechanism Advanced Sensing Technologies for Condition Monitoring and Diagnosis Application of Artificial Intelligence for Data Mining and Condition Assessment Applications of Information Technology for Asset Management Strategic Planning and Management for Condition Monitoring


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Periodicals related to Concrete

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Antennas and Propagation, IEEE Transactions on

Experimental and theoretical advances in antennas including design and development, and in the propagation of electromagnetic waves including scattering, diffraction and interaction with continuous media; and applications pertinent to antennas and propagation, such as remote sensing, applied optics, and millimeter and submillimeter wave techniques.


Instrumentation and Measurement, IEEE Transactions on

Measurements and instrumentation utilizing electrical and electronic techniques.


Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics and Frequency Control, IEEE Transactions on

IEEE Transactions on Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics and Frequency Control was the number-three journal in acoustics in 2002, according to the annual Journal Citation Report (2002 edition) published by the Institute for Scientific Information. This publication focuses on the theory, design, and application on generation, transmission, and detection of bulk and surface mechanical waves; fundamental studies in physical acoustics; design of sonic ...



Most published Xplore authors for Concrete

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Xplore Articles related to Concrete

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The efficiency of the information transfer to networks of satellite communication

G. S. Kazieva; K. S. Chezhimbaeva; T. D. Radjabov 2006 2nd IEEE/IFIP International Conference in Central Asia on Internet, 2006

At present it is a great demand to transfer great volumes of the various information, basically electronic and telecommunication for big distances. Therefore it is important to have a high-quality access on switching units which provide an output to all important communication lines. In Kazakhstan where distances between settlements are big and quality of ground lines leaves much to be ...


Cascade Model of Error Source and Erasure of Not Stationary Communication Channel

R. H. Djuraev; Sh. yu. Djabbarov 2006 2nd IEEE/IFIP International Conference in Central Asia on Internet, 2006

In this article the questions of cascade model construction for error source and erasure of not stationary communication channel are discussed. For chosen model the algorithm and program in Borland Pascal language was elaborated.


Estimation of Interpolation Properties of a Point

Alexander Emelyanov; Yuri Astakhov; Stanislav Klimenko 2008 International Conference on Cyberworlds, 2008

A method to estimate interpolation properties of a given point concerning a given surface to be interpolated is introduced. Benefit of using this method for mesh repairing and mesh decimation is highlighted.


High order organizational learning in air navigation services: the role of cross-functional teams

Thanos C. Papavramides 2006 IEEE International Engineering Management Conference, 2006

"An organization's ability to learn, and translate learning into action rapidly, is the ultimate competitive advantage". The paper examines how a particular class of organizations dealing with the provision of air navigation services may implement organizational learning (OL) by introducing cross- functional teams (CFTs) in the learning feedback loops. After providing the research framework and definitions, the paper explains why ...


Notice of Retraction<BR>Hot research topics and trends of SCM: A statisical review

Zhi-Hua Hu; Bin Yang; You-Fang Huang 2010 2nd IEEE International Conference on Information Management and Engineering, 2010

Notice of Retraction After careful and considered review of the content of this paper by a duly constituted expert committee, this paper has been found to be in violation of IEEE's Publication Principles. We hereby retract the content of this paper. Reasonable effort should be made to remove all past references to this paper. The presenting author of this paper ...


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Educational Resources on Concrete

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eLearning

The efficiency of the information transfer to networks of satellite communication

G. S. Kazieva; K. S. Chezhimbaeva; T. D. Radjabov 2006 2nd IEEE/IFIP International Conference in Central Asia on Internet, 2006

At present it is a great demand to transfer great volumes of the various information, basically electronic and telecommunication for big distances. Therefore it is important to have a high-quality access on switching units which provide an output to all important communication lines. In Kazakhstan where distances between settlements are big and quality of ground lines leaves much to be ...


Cascade Model of Error Source and Erasure of Not Stationary Communication Channel

R. H. Djuraev; Sh. yu. Djabbarov 2006 2nd IEEE/IFIP International Conference in Central Asia on Internet, 2006

In this article the questions of cascade model construction for error source and erasure of not stationary communication channel are discussed. For chosen model the algorithm and program in Borland Pascal language was elaborated.


Estimation of Interpolation Properties of a Point

Alexander Emelyanov; Yuri Astakhov; Stanislav Klimenko 2008 International Conference on Cyberworlds, 2008

A method to estimate interpolation properties of a given point concerning a given surface to be interpolated is introduced. Benefit of using this method for mesh repairing and mesh decimation is highlighted.


High order organizational learning in air navigation services: the role of cross-functional teams

Thanos C. Papavramides 2006 IEEE International Engineering Management Conference, 2006

"An organization's ability to learn, and translate learning into action rapidly, is the ultimate competitive advantage". The paper examines how a particular class of organizations dealing with the provision of air navigation services may implement organizational learning (OL) by introducing cross- functional teams (CFTs) in the learning feedback loops. After providing the research framework and definitions, the paper explains why ...


Notice of Retraction<BR>Hot research topics and trends of SCM: A statisical review

Zhi-Hua Hu; Bin Yang; You-Fang Huang 2010 2nd IEEE International Conference on Information Management and Engineering, 2010

Notice of Retraction After careful and considered review of the content of this paper by a duly constituted expert committee, this paper has been found to be in violation of IEEE's Publication Principles. We hereby retract the content of this paper. Reasonable effort should be made to remove all past references to this paper. The presenting author of this paper ...


More eLearning Resources

IEEE-USA E-Books

  • III Philosophical Reaction and the Mind Responsa

    The Turing Test is part of the vocabulary of popular culture -- it has appeared in works ranging from the Broadway play "Breaking the Code" to the comic strip "Robotman." The writings collected by Stuart Shieber for this book examine the profound philosophical issues surrounding the Turing Test as a criterion for intelligence. Alan Turing's idea, originally expressed in a 1950 paper titled "Computing Machinery and Intelligence" and published in the journal Mind, proposed an "indistinguishability test" that compared artifact and person. Following Descartes's dictum that it is the ability to speak that distinguishes human from beast, Turing proposed to test whether machine and person were indistinguishable in regard to verbal ability. He was not, as is often assumed, answering the question "Can machines think?" but proposing a more concrete way to ask it. Turing's proposed thought experiment encapsulates the issues that the writings in The Turing Test define and discuss.The first section of the book contains writings by philosophical precursors, including Descartes, who first proposed the idea of indistinguishablity tests. The second section contains all of Turing's writings on the Turing Test, including not only the Mind paper but also less familiar ephemeral material. The final section opens with responses to Turing's paper published in Mind soon after it first appeared. The bulk of this section, however, consists of papers from a broad spectrum of scholars in the field that directly address the issue of the Turing Test as a test for intelligence. Contributors include John R. Searle, Ned Block, Daniel C. Dennett, and Noam Chomsky (in a previously unpublished paper). Each chapter is introduced by background material that can also be read as a self-con tained essay on the Turing Test.

  • Can Machines Have Neuroses?

    The Turing Test is part of the vocabulary of popular culture -- it has appeared in works ranging from the Broadway play "Breaking the Code" to the comic strip "Robotman." The writings collected by Stuart Shieber for this book examine the profound philosophical issues surrounding the Turing Test as a criterion for intelligence. Alan Turing's idea, originally expressed in a 1950 paper titled "Computing Machinery and Intelligence" and published in the journal Mind, proposed an "indistinguishability test" that compared artifact and person. Following Descartes's dictum that it is the ability to speak that distinguishes human from beast, Turing proposed to test whether machine and person were indistinguishable in regard to verbal ability. He was not, as is often assumed, answering the question "Can machines think?" but proposing a more concrete way to ask it. Turing's proposed thought experiment encapsulates the issues that the writings in The Turing Test define and discuss.The first section of the book contains writings by philosophical precursors, including Descartes, who first proposed the idea of indistinguishablity tests. The second section contains all of Turing's writings on the Turing Test, including not only the Mind paper but also less familiar ephemeral material. The final section opens with responses to Turing's paper published in Mind soon after it first appeared. The bulk of this section, however, consists of papers from a broad spectrum of scholars in the field that directly address the issue of the Turing Test as a test for intelligence. Contributors include John R. Searle, Ned Block, Daniel C. Dennett, and Noam Chomsky (in a previously unpublished paper). Each chapter is introduced by background material that can also be read as a self-con tained essay on the Turing Test.

  • Energy Costs: Valuations and Changes

    This chapter contains sections titled: Energy Cost of Energy: Net Gains, Basic Materials: From Concrete to Fertilizers, Structures and Products: From Buildings to Computers, Crops and Animal Foods: Subsidized Diets, Modern Food System: Gains, Costs, Efficiencies

  • Why Machines Can&#x2019;t Think: A Reply to James Moor

    The Turing Test is part of the vocabulary of popular culture -- it has appeared in works ranging from the Broadway play "Breaking the Code" to the comic strip "Robotman." The writings collected by Stuart Shieber for this book examine the profound philosophical issues surrounding the Turing Test as a criterion for intelligence. Alan Turing's idea, originally expressed in a 1950 paper titled "Computing Machinery and Intelligence" and published in the journal Mind, proposed an "indistinguishability test" that compared artifact and person. Following Descartes's dictum that it is the ability to speak that distinguishes human from beast, Turing proposed to test whether machine and person were indistinguishable in regard to verbal ability. He was not, as is often assumed, answering the question "Can machines think?" but proposing a more concrete way to ask it. Turing's proposed thought experiment encapsulates the issues that the writings in The Turing Test define and discuss.The first section of the book contains writings by philosophical precursors, including Descartes, who first proposed the idea of indistinguishablity tests. The second section contains all of Turing's writings on the Turing Test, including not only the Mind paper but also less familiar ephemeral material. The final section opens with responses to Turing's paper published in Mind soon after it first appeared. The bulk of this section, however, consists of papers from a broad spectrum of scholars in the field that directly address the issue of the Turing Test as a test for intelligence. Contributors include John R. Searle, Ned Block, Daniel C. Dennett, and Noam Chomsky (in a previously unpublished paper). Each chapter is introduced by background material that can also be read as a self-con tained essay on the Turing Test.

  • Do Machines Think about Machines Thinking

    The Turing Test is part of the vocabulary of popular culture -- it has appeared in works ranging from the Broadway play "Breaking the Code" to the comic strip "Robotman." The writings collected by Stuart Shieber for this book examine the profound philosophical issues surrounding the Turing Test as a criterion for intelligence. Alan Turing's idea, originally expressed in a 1950 paper titled "Computing Machinery and Intelligence" and published in the journal Mind, proposed an "indistinguishability test" that compared artifact and person. Following Descartes's dictum that it is the ability to speak that distinguishes human from beast, Turing proposed to test whether machine and person were indistinguishable in regard to verbal ability. He was not, as is often assumed, answering the question "Can machines think?" but proposing a more concrete way to ask it. Turing's proposed thought experiment encapsulates the issues that the writings in The Turing Test define and discuss.The first section of the book contains writings by philosophical precursors, including Descartes, who first proposed the idea of indistinguishablity tests. The second section contains all of Turing's writings on the Turing Test, including not only the Mind paper but also less familiar ephemeral material. The final section opens with responses to Turing's paper published in Mind soon after it first appeared. The bulk of this section, however, consists of papers from a broad spectrum of scholars in the field that directly address the issue of the Turing Test as a test for intelligence. Contributors include John R. Searle, Ned Block, Daniel C. Dennett, and Noam Chomsky (in a previously unpublished paper). Each chapter is introduced by background material that can also be read as a self-con tained essay on the Turing Test.

  • Explaining Computer Behavior

    The Turing Test is part of the vocabulary of popular culture -- it has appeared in works ranging from the Broadway play "Breaking the Code" to the comic strip "Robotman." The writings collected by Stuart Shieber for this book examine the profound philosophical issues surrounding the Turing Test as a criterion for intelligence. Alan Turing's idea, originally expressed in a 1950 paper titled "Computing Machinery and Intelligence" and published in the journal Mind, proposed an "indistinguishability test" that compared artifact and person. Following Descartes's dictum that it is the ability to speak that distinguishes human from beast, Turing proposed to test whether machine and person were indistinguishable in regard to verbal ability. He was not, as is often assumed, answering the question "Can machines think?" but proposing a more concrete way to ask it. Turing's proposed thought experiment encapsulates the issues that the writings in The Turing Test define and discuss.The first section of the book contains writings by philosophical precursors, including Descartes, who first proposed the idea of indistinguishablity tests. The second section contains all of Turing's writings on the Turing Test, including not only the Mind paper but also less familiar ephemeral material. The final section opens with responses to Turing's paper published in Mind soon after it first appeared. The bulk of this section, however, consists of papers from a broad spectrum of scholars in the field that directly address the issue of the Turing Test as a test for intelligence. Contributors include John R. Searle, Ned Block, Daniel C. Dennett, and Noam Chomsky (in a previously unpublished paper). Each chapter is introduced by background material that can also be read as a self-con tained essay on the Turing Test.

  • The Wedge and the Spark

    The Turing Test is part of the vocabulary of popular culture -- it has appeared in works ranging from the Broadway play "Breaking the Code" to the comic strip "Robotman." The writings collected by Stuart Shieber for this book examine the profound philosophical issues surrounding the Turing Test as a criterion for intelligence. Alan Turing's idea, originally expressed in a 1950 paper titled "Computing Machinery and Intelligence" and published in the journal Mind, proposed an "indistinguishability test" that compared artifact and person. Following Descartes's dictum that it is the ability to speak that distinguishes human from beast, Turing proposed to test whether machine and person were indistinguishable in regard to verbal ability. He was not, as is often assumed, answering the question "Can machines think?" but proposing a more concrete way to ask it. Turing's proposed thought experiment encapsulates the issues that the writings in The Turing Test define and discuss.The first section of the book contains writings by philosophical precursors, including Descartes, who first proposed the idea of indistinguishablity tests. The second section contains all of Turing's writings on the Turing Test, including not only the Mind paper but also less familiar ephemeral material. The final section opens with responses to Turing's paper published in Mind soon after it first appeared. The bulk of this section, however, consists of papers from a broad spectrum of scholars in the field that directly address the issue of the Turing Test as a test for intelligence. Contributors include John R. Searle, Ned Block, Daniel C. Dennett, and Noam Chomsky (in a previously unpublished paper). Each chapter is introduced by background material that can also be read as a self-con tained essay on the Turing Test.

  • Dumping the Big Question

    The Turing Test is part of the vocabulary of popular culture -- it has appeared in works ranging from the Broadway play "Breaking the Code" to the comic strip "Robotman." The writings collected by Stuart Shieber for this book examine the profound philosophical issues surrounding the Turing Test as a criterion for intelligence. Alan Turing's idea, originally expressed in a 1950 paper titled "Computing Machinery and Intelligence" and published in the journal Mind, proposed an "indistinguishability test" that compared artifact and person. Following Descartes's dictum that it is the ability to speak that distinguishes human from beast, Turing proposed to test whether machine and person were indistinguishable in regard to verbal ability. He was not, as is often assumed, answering the question "Can machines think?" but proposing a more concrete way to ask it. Turing's proposed thought experiment encapsulates the issues that the writings in The Turing Test define and discuss.The first section of the book contains writings by philosophical precursors, including Descartes, who first proposed the idea of indistinguishablity tests. The second section contains all of Turing's writings on the Turing Test, including not only the Mind paper but also less familiar ephemeral material. The final section opens with responses to Turing's paper published in Mind soon after it first appeared. The bulk of this section, however, consists of papers from a broad spectrum of scholars in the field that directly address the issue of the Turing Test as a test for intelligence. Contributors include John R. Searle, Ned Block, Daniel C. Dennett, and Noam Chomsky (in a previously unpublished paper). Each chapter is introduced by background material that can also be read as a self-con tained essay on the Turing Test.

  • The Imitation Game

    The Turing Test is part of the vocabulary of popular culture -- it has appeared in works ranging from the Broadway play "Breaking the Code" to the comic strip "Robotman." The writings collected by Stuart Shieber for this book examine the profound philosophical issues surrounding the Turing Test as a criterion for intelligence. Alan Turing's idea, originally expressed in a 1950 paper titled "Computing Machinery and Intelligence" and published in the journal Mind, proposed an "indistinguishability test" that compared artifact and person. Following Descartes's dictum that it is the ability to speak that distinguishes human from beast, Turing proposed to test whether machine and person were indistinguishable in regard to verbal ability. He was not, as is often assumed, answering the question "Can machines think?" but proposing a more concrete way to ask it. Turing's proposed thought experiment encapsulates the issues that the writings in The Turing Test define and discuss.The first section of the book contains writings by philosophical precursors, including Descartes, who first proposed the idea of indistinguishablity tests. The second section contains all of Turing's writings on the Turing Test, including not only the Mind paper but also less familiar ephemeral material. The final section opens with responses to Turing's paper published in Mind soon after it first appeared. The bulk of this section, however, consists of papers from a broad spectrum of scholars in the field that directly address the issue of the Turing Test as a test for intelligence. Contributors include John R. Searle, Ned Block, Daniel C. Dennett, and Noam Chomsky (in a previously unpublished paper). Each chapter is introduced by background material that can also be read as a self-con tained essay on the Turing Test.

  • Overview

    As we move closer to a genuinely global economy, the pressure to develop highly reliable products on ever-tighter schedules will increase. Part of a designer's "toolbox" for achieving product reliability in a compressed time frame should be a set of best practices for utilizing accelerated stress testing (AST). _The Accelerated Stress Testing Handbook_ delineates a core set of AST practices as part of an overall methodology for enhancing hardware product reliability. The techniques presented will teach readers to identify design deficiencies and problems with component quality or manufacturing processes early in the product's life, and then to take corrective action as quickly as possible. A wide array of case studies gleaned from leading practitioners of AST supplement the theory and methodology, which will provide the reader with a more concrete idea of how AST truly enhances quality in a reduced time frame. Important topics covered include: * Theoretical basi for AST * General AST best practices * AST design and manufacturing processes * AST equipment and techniques * AST process safety qualification In this handbook, AST cases studies demonstrate thermal, vibration, electrical, and liquid stress application; failure mode analysis; and corrective action techniques. Individuals who would be interested in this book include: reliability engineers and researchers, mechanical and electrical engineers, those involved with all facets of electronics and telecommunications product design and manufacturing, and people responsible for implementing quality and process improvement programs.



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