ARPANET

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The Advanced Research Projects Agency Network (ARPANET), was the world's first operational packet switching network and the core network of a set that came to compose the global Internet. (Wikipedia.org)






Conferences related to ARPANET

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2012 Australasian Telecommunication Networks and Applications Conference (ATNAC 2012)

WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS CDMA, TDMA AND OTHER AIR INTERFACE NEXT GENERATION WIRELESS TECHNOLOGIES SATELLITE AND SPACE COMMUNICATIONS MULTIMEDIA COMMUNICATIONS NETWORK AND INFORMATION SECURITY INTERFACE OPTICS, WIRELESS AND COOPERATIVE SIGNAL GRID COMPUTING AND SERVICE COMPUTING WI-MAX AND LTE QOS AND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT WIRELESS ROUTING AND AD-HOC NETWORKS


2012 Portland International Conference on Management of Engineering & Technology (PICMET)

PICMET's focus is on bringing together the experts on technology management to address the issues involved in managing current and emerging technologies.


2011 15th International Conference on Optical Networking Design and Modeling (ONDM)

As it is established practice ONDM will focus on cutting-edge, state- of-the-art research in optical networking. ONDM will also encourage submissions of the research papers that relate the topics of optical networking to the other areas and disciplines, such as integration of optical and wireless networks or the role of optical network for the future Internet design. Controversial ideas and approaches and their open discussion are strongly encouraged.


2011 4th International Symposium on Computational Intelligence and Design (ISCID)

Computational Intelligence techniques typically include Fuzzy Logic, Evolutionary Computation, Intelligent Agent Systems, Neural Networks, Cellular Automata, Artificial Immune Systems and other similar computational models. Computational Intelligence constitutes an umbrella of techniques, has proven to be flexible in decision making in dynamic environment.


2011 IEEE Aerospace Conference

The international IEEE Aerospace Conference is organized to promote interdisciplinary understanding of aerospace systems, their underlying science and technology, and their applications to government and commercial endeavors.


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Periodicals related to ARPANET

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Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine, IEEE

The IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine publishes articles concerned with the various aspects of systems for space, air, ocean, or ground environments.


Automatic Control, IEEE Transactions on

The theory, design and application of Control Systems. It shall encompass components, and the integration of these components, as are necessary for the construction of such systems. The word `systems' as used herein shall be interpreted to include physical, biological, organizational and other entities and combinations thereof, which can be represented through a mathematical symbolism. The Field of Interest: shall ...


Communications Magazine, IEEE

IEEE Communications Magazine was the number three most-cited journal in telecommunications and the number eighteen cited journal in electrical and electronics engineering in 2004, according to the annual Journal Citation Report (2004 edition) published by the Institute for Scientific Information. Read more at http://www.ieee.org/products/citations.html. This magazine covers all areas of communications such as lightwave telecommunications, high-speed data communications, personal communications ...


Communications, IEEE Transactions on

Telephone, telegraphy, facsimile, and point-to-point television, by electromagnetic propagation, including radio; wire; aerial, underground, coaxial, and submarine cables; waveguides, communication satellites, and lasers; in marine, aeronautical, space and fixed station services; repeaters, radio relaying, signal storage, and regeneration; telecommunication error detection and correction; multiplexing and carrier techniques; communication switching systems; data communications; and communication theory. In addition to the above, ...


Computer

Computer, the flagship publication of the IEEE Computer Society, publishes peer-reviewed technical content that covers all aspects of computer science, computer engineering, technology, and applications. Computer is a resource that practitioners, researchers, and managers can rely on to provide timely information about current research developments, trends, best practices, and changes in the profession.


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Xplore Articles related to ARPANET

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Computer/network interface design: lessons from Arpanet and Ethernet

R. M. Metcalfe IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communications, 1993

The author's involvement in developing Arpanet and Ethernet computer network interfaces is described. The lessons learned in designing and implementing Arpanet in 1969 and Ethernet in 1989 are discussed. It is argued that some of the more general lessons are likely to be applicable to interfaces operating on up to a terabit, petabit, or perhaps even an exabit per second


One-way resource reservation protocols for IP over optical burst switched mesh networks

J. J. P. C. Rodrigues; M. M. Freire; P. Lorenz 2005 Systems Communications (ICW'05, ICHSN'05, ICMCS'05, SENET'05), 2005

In this paper, we present a performance assessment of one-way resource reservation protocols in optical burst switched (OBS) mesh networks. The performance analysis considers five resource reservation protocols, Just-In- Time (JIT), JumpStart, JIT+, Just-Enough-Time (JET) and Horizon, and focuses on the following topologies: rings, degree-three chordal rings, degree-four chordal rings, degree-five chordal rings, degree-six chordal rings, mesh- torus, NSFNET, ARPANET ...


Virtual network embedding and reconfiguration in elastic optical networks

Sunny Shakya; Nabina Pradhan; Xiaojun Cao; Zilong Ye; Chunming Qiao 2014 IEEE Global Communications Conference, 2014

Recent innovations in Network Virtualization and Elastic Optical Networks (EONs) enable flexible deployment of optical networks as a service. However, one open challenge is how to embed Virtual Optical Network (VON) requests onto the physical substrate network to maximize the sharing of physical resources, which is the so called Virtual Network Embedding (VNE) problem. EONs are prone to the fragmentation ...


Terminal Protocols

J. Day IEEE Transactions on Communications, 1980

Terminal protocols provide basic services for the users of computer networks. This paper presents a survey of the architecture and mechanisms used in current terminal protocols. The paper disusses both parametric terminal protocols such as the CCITT X.3, X.28, and X.29 and virtual terminal protocols, such as the ARPANET TELNET protocol. Many of the problems encountered in terminal protocols recur ...


The New Routing Algorithm for the ARPANET

J. McQuillan; I. Richer; E. Rosen IEEE Transactions on Communications, 1980

The new ARPANET routing algorithm is an improvement over the old procedure in that it uses fewer network resources, operates on more realistic estimates of network conditions, reacts faster to important network changes, and does not suffer from long-term loops or oscillations. In the new procedure, each node in the network maintains a database describing the complete network topology and ...


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Educational Resources on ARPANET

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eLearning

Computer/network interface design: lessons from Arpanet and Ethernet

R. M. Metcalfe IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communications, 1993

The author's involvement in developing Arpanet and Ethernet computer network interfaces is described. The lessons learned in designing and implementing Arpanet in 1969 and Ethernet in 1989 are discussed. It is argued that some of the more general lessons are likely to be applicable to interfaces operating on up to a terabit, petabit, or perhaps even an exabit per second


One-way resource reservation protocols for IP over optical burst switched mesh networks

J. J. P. C. Rodrigues; M. M. Freire; P. Lorenz 2005 Systems Communications (ICW'05, ICHSN'05, ICMCS'05, SENET'05), 2005

In this paper, we present a performance assessment of one-way resource reservation protocols in optical burst switched (OBS) mesh networks. The performance analysis considers five resource reservation protocols, Just-In- Time (JIT), JumpStart, JIT+, Just-Enough-Time (JET) and Horizon, and focuses on the following topologies: rings, degree-three chordal rings, degree-four chordal rings, degree-five chordal rings, degree-six chordal rings, mesh- torus, NSFNET, ARPANET ...


Virtual network embedding and reconfiguration in elastic optical networks

Sunny Shakya; Nabina Pradhan; Xiaojun Cao; Zilong Ye; Chunming Qiao 2014 IEEE Global Communications Conference, 2014

Recent innovations in Network Virtualization and Elastic Optical Networks (EONs) enable flexible deployment of optical networks as a service. However, one open challenge is how to embed Virtual Optical Network (VON) requests onto the physical substrate network to maximize the sharing of physical resources, which is the so called Virtual Network Embedding (VNE) problem. EONs are prone to the fragmentation ...


Terminal Protocols

J. Day IEEE Transactions on Communications, 1980

Terminal protocols provide basic services for the users of computer networks. This paper presents a survey of the architecture and mechanisms used in current terminal protocols. The paper disusses both parametric terminal protocols such as the CCITT X.3, X.28, and X.29 and virtual terminal protocols, such as the ARPANET TELNET protocol. Many of the problems encountered in terminal protocols recur ...


The New Routing Algorithm for the ARPANET

J. McQuillan; I. Richer; E. Rosen IEEE Transactions on Communications, 1980

The new ARPANET routing algorithm is an improvement over the old procedure in that it uses fewer network resources, operates on more realistic estimates of network conditions, reacts faster to important network changes, and does not suffer from long-term loops or oscillations. In the new procedure, each node in the network maintains a database describing the complete network topology and ...


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IEEE-USA E-Books

  • “See you online!”

    Focusing on early social media in the arts and humanities and on the core role of creative computer scientists, artists, and scholars in shaping the pre-Web social media landscape, _Social Media Archeology and Poetics_ documents social media lineage, beginning in the 1970s with collaborative ARPANET research, Community Memory,??PLATO, Minitel, and ARTEX and continuing into the 1980s and beyond with the Electronic Caf??, Art Com Electronic Network, Arts Wire, The THING, and many more. With first person accounts from pioneers in the field, as well as papers by artists, scholars, and curators, _Social Media Archeology and Poetics_ documents how these platforms were vital components of early social networking and important in the development of new media and electronic literature. It describes platforms that allowed artists and musicians to share and publish their work, community networking diversity, and the creation of footholds for the arts and humanities online. And _ _it _ _invites comparisons of social media in the past and present, asking: What can we learn from early social media that will inspire us to envision a greater cultural presence on contemporary social media? **Contributors**Madeline Gonzalez Allen, James Blustein, Hank Bull, Annick Bureaud, J. R. Carpenter, Paul E. Ceruzzi, Anna Couey, Amanda McDonald Crowley, Steve Dietz, Judith Donath, Steven Durland, Lee Felsenstein, Susanne Gerber, Ann-Barbara Graff, Dene Grigar, Stacy Horn, Antoinette LaFarge, Deena Larsen, Gary O. Larson, Alan Liu, Geert Lovink, Richard Lowenberg, Judy Malloy, Scott McPhee, Julianne Nyhan, Howard Rheingold, Randy Ross, Wolfgang Staehle, Fred Truck, Rob Wittig, David R. Woolley

  • Conclusion

    The history of computing could be told as the story of hardware and software, or the story of the Internet, or the story of "smart" hand-held devices, with subplots involving IBM, Microsoft, Apple, Facebook, and Twitter. In this concise and accessible account of the invention and development of digital technology, computer historian Paul Ceruzzi offers a broader and more useful perspective. He identifies four major threads that run throughout all of computing's technological development: digitization--the coding of information, computation, and control in binary form, ones and zeros; the convergence of multiple streams of techniques, devices, and machines, yielding more than the sum of their parts; the steady advance of electronic technology, as characterized famously by "Moore's Law"; and the human-machine interface. Ceruzzi guides us through computing history, telling how a Bell Labs mathematician coined the word "digital" in 1942 (to describe a high-speed method of calculating used in anti-aircraft devices), and recounting the development of the punch card (for use in the 1890 U.S. Census). He describes the ENIAC, built for scientific and military applications; the UNIVAC, the first general purpose computer; and ARPANET, the Internet's precursor. Ceruzzi's account traces the world-changing evolution of the computer from a room-size ensemble of machinery to a "minicomputer" to a desktop computer to a pocket-sized smart phone. He describes the development of the silicon chip, which could store ever-increasing amounts of data and enabled ever-decreasing device size. He visits that hotbed of innovation, Silicon Valley, and brings the story up to the present with the Internet, the World Wide Web, and social networking.

  • Social Media Poetics

    Focusing on early social media in the arts and humanities and on the core role of creative computer scientists, artists, and scholars in shaping the pre-Web social media landscape, _Social Media Archeology and Poetics_ documents social media lineage, beginning in the 1970s with collaborative ARPANET research, Community Memory,??PLATO, Minitel, and ARTEX and continuing into the 1980s and beyond with the Electronic Caf??, Art Com Electronic Network, Arts Wire, The THING, and many more. With first person accounts from pioneers in the field, as well as papers by artists, scholars, and curators, _Social Media Archeology and Poetics_ documents how these platforms were vital components of early social networking and important in the development of new media and electronic literature. It describes platforms that allowed artists and musicians to share and publish their work, community networking diversity, and the creation of footholds for the arts and humanities online. And _ _it _ _invites comparisons of social media in the past and present, asking: What can we learn from early social media that will inspire us to envision a greater cultural presence on contemporary social media? **Contributors**Madeline Gonzalez Allen, James Blustein, Hank Bull, Annick Bureaud, J. R. Carpenter, Paul E. Ceruzzi, Anna Couey, Amanda McDonald Crowley, Steve Dietz, Judith Donath, Steven Durland, Lee Felsenstein, Susanne Gerber, Ann-Barbara Graff, Dene Grigar, Stacy Horn, Antoinette LaFarge, Deena Larsen, Gary O. Larson, Alan Liu, Geert Lovink, Richard Lowenberg, Judy Malloy, Scott McPhee, Julianne Nyhan, Howard Rheingold, Randy Ross, Wolfgang Staehle, Fred Truck, Rob Wittig, David R. Woolley

  • Notes

    The history of computing could be told as the story of hardware and software, or the story of the Internet, or the story of "smart" hand-held devices, with subplots involving IBM, Microsoft, Apple, Facebook, and Twitter. In this concise and accessible account of the invention and development of digital technology, computer historian Paul Ceruzzi offers a broader and more useful perspective. He identifies four major threads that run throughout all of computing's technological development: digitization--the coding of information, computation, and control in binary form, ones and zeros; the convergence of multiple streams of techniques, devices, and machines, yielding more than the sum of their parts; the steady advance of electronic technology, as characterized famously by "Moore's Law"; and the human-machine interface. Ceruzzi guides us through computing history, telling how a Bell Labs mathematician coined the word "digital" in 1942 (to describe a high-speed method of calculating used in anti-aircraft devices), and recounting the development of the punch card (for use in the 1890 U.S. Census). He describes the ENIAC, built for scientific and military applications; the UNIVAC, the first general purpose computer; and ARPANET, the Internet's precursor. Ceruzzi's account traces the world-changing evolution of the computer from a room-size ensemble of machinery to a "minicomputer" to a desktop computer to a pocket-sized smart phone. He describes the development of the silicon chip, which could store ever-increasing amounts of data and enabled ever-decreasing device size. He visits that hotbed of innovation, Silicon Valley, and brings the story up to the present with the Internet, the World Wide Web, and social networking.

  • Annotated List of Slavic Names

    Between 1959 and 1989, Soviet scientists and officials made numerous attempts to network their nation -- to construct a nationwide computer network. None of these attempts succeeded, and the enterprise had been abandoned by the time the Soviet Union fell apart. Meanwhile, ARPANET, the American precursor to the Internet, went online in 1969. Why did the Soviet network, with top-level scientists and patriotic incentives, fail while the American network succeeded? In _How Not to Network a Nation_, Benjamin Peters reverses the usual cold war dualities and argues that the American ARPANET took shape thanks to well-managed state subsidies and collaborative research environments and the Soviet network projects stumbled because of unregulated competition among self-interested institutions, bureaucrats, and others. The capitalists behaved like socialists while the socialists behaved like capitalists. After examining the midcentury rise of cybernetics, the science of self- governi g systems, and the emergence in the Soviet Union of economic cybernetics, Peters complicates this uneasy role reversal while chronicling the various Soviet attempts to build a "unified information network." Drawing on previously unknown archival and historical materials, he focuses on the final, and most ambitious of these projects, the All-State Automated System of Management (OGAS), and its principal promoter, Viktor M. Glushkov. Peters describes the rise and fall of OGAS -- its theoretical and practical reach, its vision of a national economy managed by network, the bureaucratic obstacles it encountered, and the institutional stalemate that killed it. Finally, he considers the implications of the Soviet experience for today's networked world.

  • Responses

    Focusing on early social media in the arts and humanities and on the core role of creative computer scientists, artists, and scholars in shaping the pre-Web social media landscape, _Social Media Archeology and Poetics_ documents social media lineage, beginning in the 1970s with collaborative ARPANET research, Community Memory,??PLATO, Minitel, and ARTEX and continuing into the 1980s and beyond with the Electronic Caf??, Art Com Electronic Network, Arts Wire, The THING, and many more. With first person accounts from pioneers in the field, as well as papers by artists, scholars, and curators, _Social Media Archeology and Poetics_ documents how these platforms were vital components of early social networking and important in the development of new media and electronic literature. It describes platforms that allowed artists and musicians to share and publish their work, community networking diversity, and the creation of footholds for the arts and humanities online. And _ _it _ _invites comparisons of social media in the past and present, asking: What can we learn from early social media that will inspire us to envision a greater cultural presence on contemporary social media? **Contributors**Madeline Gonzalez Allen, James Blustein, Hank Bull, Annick Bureaud, J. R. Carpenter, Paul E. Ceruzzi, Anna Couey, Amanda McDonald Crowley, Steve Dietz, Judith Donath, Steven Durland, Lee Felsenstein, Susanne Gerber, Ann-Barbara Graff, Dene Grigar, Stacy Horn, Antoinette LaFarge, Deena Larsen, Gary O. Larson, Alan Liu, Geert Lovink, Richard Lowenberg, Judy Malloy, Scott McPhee, Julianne Nyhan, Howard Rheingold, Randy Ross, Wolfgang Staehle, Fred Truck, Rob Wittig, David R. Woolley

  • Glossary

    The history of computing could be told as the story of hardware and software, or the story of the Internet, or the story of "smart" hand-held devices, with subplots involving IBM, Microsoft, Apple, Facebook, and Twitter. In this concise and accessible account of the invention and development of digital technology, computer historian Paul Ceruzzi offers a broader and more useful perspective. He identifies four major threads that run throughout all of computing's technological development: digitization--the coding of information, computation, and control in binary form, ones and zeros; the convergence of multiple streams of techniques, devices, and machines, yielding more than the sum of their parts; the steady advance of electronic technology, as characterized famously by "Moore's Law"; and the human-machine interface. Ceruzzi guides us through computing history, telling how a Bell Labs mathematician coined the word "digital" in 1942 (to describe a high-speed method of calculating used in anti-aircraft devices), and recounting the development of the punch card (for use in the 1890 U.S. Census). He describes the ENIAC, built for scientific and military applications; the UNIVAC, the first general purpose computer; and ARPANET, the Internet's precursor. Ceruzzi's account traces the world-changing evolution of the computer from a room-size ensemble of machinery to a "minicomputer" to a desktop computer to a pocket-sized smart phone. He describes the development of the silicon chip, which could store ever-increasing amounts of data and enabled ever-decreasing device size. He visits that hotbed of innovation, Silicon Valley, and brings the story up to the present with the Internet, the World Wide Web, and social networking.

  • About the Authors

    Focusing on early social media in the arts and humanities and on the core role of creative computer scientists, artists, and scholars in shaping the pre-Web social media landscape, _Social Media Archeology and Poetics_ documents social media lineage, beginning in the 1970s with collaborative ARPANET research, Community Memory,??PLATO, Minitel, and ARTEX and continuing into the 1980s and beyond with the Electronic Caf??, Art Com Electronic Network, Arts Wire, The THING, and many more. With first person accounts from pioneers in the field, as well as papers by artists, scholars, and curators, _Social Media Archeology and Poetics_ documents how these platforms were vital components of early social networking and important in the development of new media and electronic literature. It describes platforms that allowed artists and musicians to share and publish their work, community networking diversity, and the creation of footholds for the arts and humanities online. And _ _it _ _invites comparisons of social media in the past and present, asking: What can we learn from early social media that will inspire us to envision a greater cultural presence on contemporary social media? **Contributors**Madeline Gonzalez Allen, James Blustein, Hank Bull, Annick Bureaud, J. R. Carpenter, Paul E. Ceruzzi, Anna Couey, Amanda McDonald Crowley, Steve Dietz, Judith Donath, Steven Durland, Lee Felsenstein, Susanne Gerber, Ann-Barbara Graff, Dene Grigar, Stacy Horn, Antoinette LaFarge, Deena Larsen, Gary O. Larson, Alan Liu, Geert Lovink, Richard Lowenberg, Judy Malloy, Scott McPhee, Julianne Nyhan, Howard Rheingold, Randy Ross, Wolfgang Staehle, Fred Truck, Rob Wittig, David R. Woolley

  • “Opening the Door to Cyberspace”

    Focusing on early social media in the arts and humanities and on the core role of creative computer scientists, artists, and scholars in shaping the pre-Web social media landscape, _Social Media Archeology and Poetics_ documents social media lineage, beginning in the 1970s with collaborative ARPANET research, Community Memory,??PLATO, Minitel, and ARTEX and continuing into the 1980s and beyond with the Electronic Caf??, Art Com Electronic Network, Arts Wire, The THING, and many more. With first person accounts from pioneers in the field, as well as papers by artists, scholars, and curators, _Social Media Archeology and Poetics_ documents how these platforms were vital components of early social networking and important in the development of new media and electronic literature. It describes platforms that allowed artists and musicians to share and publish their work, community networking diversity, and the creation of footholds for the arts and humanities online. And _ _it _ _invites comparisons of social media in the past and present, asking: What can we learn from early social media that will inspire us to envision a greater cultural presence on contemporary social media? **Contributors**Madeline Gonzalez Allen, James Blustein, Hank Bull, Annick Bureaud, J. R. Carpenter, Paul E. Ceruzzi, Anna Couey, Amanda McDonald Crowley, Steve Dietz, Judith Donath, Steven Durland, Lee Felsenstein, Susanne Gerber, Ann-Barbara Graff, Dene Grigar, Stacy Horn, Antoinette LaFarge, Deena Larsen, Gary O. Larson, Alan Liu, Geert Lovink, Richard Lowenberg, Judy Malloy, Scott McPhee, Julianne Nyhan, Howard Rheingold, Randy Ross, Wolfgang Staehle, Fred Truck, Rob Wittig, David R. Woolley

  • Network and Other Project Acronyms

    Between 1959 and 1989, Soviet scientists and officials made numerous attempts to network their nation -- to construct a nationwide computer network. None of these attempts succeeded, and the enterprise had been abandoned by the time the Soviet Union fell apart. Meanwhile, ARPANET, the American precursor to the Internet, went online in 1969. Why did the Soviet network, with top-level scientists and patriotic incentives, fail while the American network succeeded? In _How Not to Network a Nation_, Benjamin Peters reverses the usual cold war dualities and argues that the American ARPANET took shape thanks to well-managed state subsidies and collaborative research environments and the Soviet network projects stumbled because of unregulated competition among self-interested institutions, bureaucrats, and others. The capitalists behaved like socialists while the socialists behaved like capitalists. After examining the midcentury rise of cybernetics, the science of self- governi g systems, and the emergence in the Soviet Union of economic cybernetics, Peters complicates this uneasy role reversal while chronicling the various Soviet attempts to build a "unified information network." Drawing on previously unknown archival and historical materials, he focuses on the final, and most ambitious of these projects, the All-State Automated System of Management (OGAS), and its principal promoter, Viktor M. Glushkov. Peters describes the rise and fall of OGAS -- its theoretical and practical reach, its vision of a national economy managed by network, the bureaucratic obstacles it encountered, and the institutional stalemate that killed it. Finally, he considers the implications of the Soviet experience for today's networked world.



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