ARPANET

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The Advanced Research Projects Agency Network (ARPANET), was the world's first operational packet switching network and the core network of a set that came to compose the global Internet. (Wikipedia.org)




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Communications Magazine, IEEE

IEEE Communications Magazine was the number three most-cited journal in telecommunications and the number eighteen cited journal in electrical and electronics engineering in 2004, according to the annual Journal Citation Report (2004 edition) published by the Institute for Scientific Information. Read more at http://www.ieee.org/products/citations.html. This magazine covers all areas of communications such as lightwave telecommunications, high-speed data communications, personal communications ...


Communications, IEEE Transactions on

Telephone, telegraphy, facsimile, and point-to-point television, by electromagnetic propagation, including radio; wire; aerial, underground, coaxial, and submarine cables; waveguides, communication satellites, and lasers; in marine, aeronautical, space and fixed station services; repeaters, radio relaying, signal storage, and regeneration; telecommunication error detection and correction; multiplexing and carrier techniques; communication switching systems; data communications; and communication theory. In addition to the above, ...


Selected Areas in Communications, IEEE Journal on

All telecommunications, including telephone, telegraphy, facsimile, and point-to-point television, by electromagnetic propagation, including radio; wire; aerial, underground, coaxial, and submarine cables; waveguides, communication satellites, and lasers; in marine, aeronautical, space, and fixed station services; repeaters, radio relaying, signal storage, and regeneration; telecommunication error detection and correction; multiplexing and carrier techniques; communication switching systems; data communications; communication theory; and wireless communications.




Xplore Articles related to ARPANET

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Design and simulation implementation of protection algorithms based on Network Coding in mesh networks

Fei Wang; HongBo Guan 2011 International Conference on Multimedia Technology, 2011

Since people increasingly depend on the communication network in all aspects of social life, they propose the greater demand for network bandwidth and more stringent requirement for network survivability. Based on this idea people proposed the protection algorithm based on the network coding that is a breakthrough in information processing and transmission theory in communication network since it allows the ...


The Fleet Command Center Battle Management Project: lessons learned

R. Saunders Proceedings [1990] IEEE Conference on Managing Expert System Programs and Projects, 1990

Lessons learned from the experience of the Fleet Command Center Battle Management Program (FCCBMP) are documented. FCCBMP is an element of the Defense Advanced Project Agency's Strategic Computing Program (SCP), which aims to stimulate the development and application of advanced technologies for military problems. FCCBMP has been the most successful of the SCP programs to date in bringing expert systems ...


User-Oriented performance measurements on the ARPANET

N. Seitz; D. Wortendyke; K. Spies IEEE Communications Magazine, 1983

First Page of the Article ![](/xploreAssets/images/absImages/01091417.png)


Methodology to Solve the Count-To-Infinity Problem by Accepting and Forwarding Correct and Updated Information Only Using "Test" Packet

Amit D. Kothari; Dharmendra T. Patel 2009 IEEE International Advance Computing Conference, 2009

In distance vector routing [4,7, 9, 10] each router collects and forwards the information from and to the neighbors. It was the original ARPANET routing algorithm and use in the Internet under the RIP [2]. The methodology of collecting and broadcasting the routing related information initiates the problems i.e. (1) two-node loop instability, (2) three-node loop instability and (3) count-to-infinity, ...


Insomniac wizards revisited [Book Reviews]

L. Goeller IEEE Technology and Society Magazine, 2000

First Page of the Article ![](/xploreAssets/images/absImages/00846269.png)


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Educational Resources on ARPANET

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eLearning

Design and simulation implementation of protection algorithms based on Network Coding in mesh networks

Fei Wang; HongBo Guan 2011 International Conference on Multimedia Technology, 2011

Since people increasingly depend on the communication network in all aspects of social life, they propose the greater demand for network bandwidth and more stringent requirement for network survivability. Based on this idea people proposed the protection algorithm based on the network coding that is a breakthrough in information processing and transmission theory in communication network since it allows the ...


The Fleet Command Center Battle Management Project: lessons learned

R. Saunders Proceedings [1990] IEEE Conference on Managing Expert System Programs and Projects, 1990

Lessons learned from the experience of the Fleet Command Center Battle Management Program (FCCBMP) are documented. FCCBMP is an element of the Defense Advanced Project Agency's Strategic Computing Program (SCP), which aims to stimulate the development and application of advanced technologies for military problems. FCCBMP has been the most successful of the SCP programs to date in bringing expert systems ...


User-Oriented performance measurements on the ARPANET

N. Seitz; D. Wortendyke; K. Spies IEEE Communications Magazine, 1983

First Page of the Article ![](/xploreAssets/images/absImages/01091417.png)


Methodology to Solve the Count-To-Infinity Problem by Accepting and Forwarding Correct and Updated Information Only Using "Test" Packet

Amit D. Kothari; Dharmendra T. Patel 2009 IEEE International Advance Computing Conference, 2009

In distance vector routing [4,7, 9, 10] each router collects and forwards the information from and to the neighbors. It was the original ARPANET routing algorithm and use in the Internet under the RIP [2]. The methodology of collecting and broadcasting the routing related information initiates the problems i.e. (1) two-node loop instability, (2) three-node loop instability and (3) count-to-infinity, ...


Insomniac wizards revisited [Book Reviews]

L. Goeller IEEE Technology and Society Magazine, 2000

First Page of the Article ![](/xploreAssets/images/absImages/00846269.png)


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IEEE-USA E-Books

  • The Aftermatb of the ARPANET

    Spanning the entire history of electrical communications, this book tells the story of the many events and breakthroughs that took place from the creation of the telegraph 150 years ago to the dynamic modern, world of the Internet and interactive TV. As a veritable case study in how advances in technology cause societal and industrial change, this story provides insight into the current turmoil in the information and entertainment industries. Its characters include the technologists, the entrepreneurs, the litigators, anti- trust lawyers, and regulators who influenced the course of progress. This book will be of interest to anyone who has a stake in the information age.

  • Index

    Between 1959 and 1989, Soviet scientists and officials made numerous attempts to network their nation -- to construct a nationwide computer network. None of these attempts succeeded, and the enterprise had been abandoned by the time the Soviet Union fell apart. Meanwhile, ARPANET, the American precursor to the Internet, went online in 1969. Why did the Soviet network, with top-level scientists and patriotic incentives, fail while the American network succeeded? In _How Not to Network a Nation_, Benjamin Peters reverses the usual cold war dualities and argues that the American ARPANET took shape thanks to well-managed state subsidies and collaborative research environments and the Soviet network projects stumbled because of unregulated competition among self-interested institutions, bureaucrats, and others. The capitalists behaved like socialists while the socialists behaved like capitalists. After examining the midcentury rise of cybernetics, the science of self- governi g systems, and the emergence in the Soviet Union of economic cybernetics, Peters complicates this uneasy role reversal while chronicling the various Soviet attempts to build a "unified information network." Drawing on previously unknown archival and historical materials, he focuses on the final, and most ambitious of these projects, the All-State Automated System of Management (OGAS), and its principal promoter, Viktor M. Glushkov. Peters describes the rise and fall of OGAS -- its theoretical and practical reach, its vision of a national economy managed by network, the bureaucratic obstacles it encountered, and the institutional stalemate that killed it. Finally, he considers the implications of the Soviet experience for today's networked world.

  • Acknowledgments

    Leo Beranek, an Iowa farm boy who became a Renaissance man--scientist, inventor, entrepreneur, musician, television executive, philanthropist, and author--has lived life in constant motion. His seventy-year career, through the most tumultuous and transformative years of the last century, has always been propelled by the sheer exhilaration of trying something new. In Riding The Waves, Leo Beranek tells his story. Beranek's life changed direction on a summer day in 1935 when he stopped to help a motorist with a flat tire. The driver just happened to be a former Harvard professor of engineering, who guided the young Beranek toward a full scholarship at Harvard's graduate school of engineering. Beranek went on to be one of the world's leading experts on acoustics. He became Director of Harvard's Electro-Acoustic Laboratory, where he invented the Hush-A-Phone--a telephone accessory that began the chain of regulatory challenges and lawsuits that led ultimately to the breakup of the Bell Telephone monopoly in the 1980s. Beranek moved to MIT to be a professor and Technical Director of its Acoustics Laboratory, then left academia to found the acoustical consulting firm Bolt, Beranek and Newman. Known for his work in noise control and concert acoustics, Beranek devised the world's largest muffler to quiet jet noise and served as acoustical consultant for concert halls around the world (including the Tanglewood Music Shed, the storied summer home of the Boston Symphony Orchestra). As president of BBN, he assembled the software group that invented both the ARPANET, the forerunner of the Internet, and e-mail. In the 1970s, Beranek risked his life savings to secure the license to operate a television station; he turned Channel 5 in Boston into one of the country&# 39;s best, then sold it to Metromedia in 1982 for the highest price ever paid up to that time for a broadcast station. "One central lesson I've learned is the value of risk-taking and of moving on when risks turn into busts or odds look better elsewhere," Beranek writes. Riding The Waves is a testament to the boldness, diligence, and intelligence behind Beranek's lifetime of extraordinary achievement. Leo Beranek is a pioneer in acoustical research, known for his work in noise control and the acoustics of concert halls, and the author of twelve books on these topics. The many awards he has received include the Presidential National Medal of Science, presented in 2003.

  • Degrees, Awards, and Honors

    Leo Beranek, an Iowa farm boy who became a Renaissance man--scientist, inventor, entrepreneur, musician, television executive, philanthropist, and author--has lived life in constant motion. His seventy-year career, through the most tumultuous and transformative years of the last century, has always been propelled by the sheer exhilaration of trying something new. In Riding The Waves, Leo Beranek tells his story. Beranek's life changed direction on a summer day in 1935 when he stopped to help a motorist with a flat tire. The driver just happened to be a former Harvard professor of engineering, who guided the young Beranek toward a full scholarship at Harvard's graduate school of engineering. Beranek went on to be one of the world's leading experts on acoustics. He became Director of Harvard's Electro-Acoustic Laboratory, where he invented the Hush-A-Phone--a telephone accessory that began the chain of regulatory challenges and lawsuits that led ultimately to the breakup of the Bell Telephone monopoly in the 1980s. Beranek moved to MIT to be a professor and Technical Director of its Acoustics Laboratory, then left academia to found the acoustical consulting firm Bolt, Beranek and Newman. Known for his work in noise control and concert acoustics, Beranek devised the world's largest muffler to quiet jet noise and served as acoustical consultant for concert halls around the world (including the Tanglewood Music Shed, the storied summer home of the Boston Symphony Orchestra). As president of BBN, he assembled the software group that invented both the ARPANET, the forerunner of the Internet, and e-mail. In the 1970s, Beranek risked his life savings to secure the license to operate a television station; he turned Channel 5 in Boston into one of the country&# 39;s best, then sold it to Metromedia in 1982 for the highest price ever paid up to that time for a broadcast station. "One central lesson I've learned is the value of risk-taking and of moving on when risks turn into busts or odds look better elsewhere," Beranek writes. Riding The Waves is a testament to the boldness, diligence, and intelligence behind Beranek's lifetime of extraordinary achievement. Leo Beranek is a pioneer in acoustical research, known for his work in noise control and the acoustics of concert halls, and the author of twelve books on these topics. The many awards he has received include the Presidential National Medal of Science, presented in 2003.

  • The Global Matrix of Minds

    This chapter contains sections titled: Speeds and Services, The ARPANET, NSFNET, Population, Communication, Boundaries, Conclusion

  • Further Reading

    The history of computing could be told as the story of hardware and software, or the story of the Internet, or the story of "smart" hand-held devices, with subplots involving IBM, Microsoft, Apple, Facebook, and Twitter. In this concise and accessible account of the invention and development of digital technology, computer historian Paul Ceruzzi offers a broader and more useful perspective. He identifies four major threads that run throughout all of computing's technological development: digitization--the coding of information, computation, and control in binary form, ones and zeros; the convergence of multiple streams of techniques, devices, and machines, yielding more than the sum of their parts; the steady advance of electronic technology, as characterized famously by "Moore's Law"; and the human-machine interface. Ceruzzi guides us through computing history, telling how a Bell Labs mathematician coined the word "digital" in 1942 (to describe a high-speed method of calculating used in anti-aircraft devices), and recounting the development of the punch card (for use in the 1890 U.S. Census). He describes the ENIAC, built for scientific and military applications; the UNIVAC, the first general purpose computer; and ARPANET, the Internet's precursor. Ceruzzi's account traces the world-changing evolution of the computer from a room-size ensemble of machinery to a "minicomputer" to a desktop computer to a pocket-sized smart phone. He describes the development of the silicon chip, which could store ever-increasing amounts of data and enabled ever-decreasing device size. He visits that hotbed of innovation, Silicon Valley, and brings the story up to the present with the Internet, the World Wide Web, and social networking.

  • Social Media Poetics

    Focusing on early social media in the arts and humanities and on the core role of creative computer scientists, artists, and scholars in shaping the pre-Web social media landscape, _Social Media Archeology and Poetics_ documents social media lineage, beginning in the 1970s with collaborative ARPANET research, Community Memory,??PLATO, Minitel, and ARTEX and continuing into the 1980s and beyond with the Electronic Caf??, Art Com Electronic Network, Arts Wire, The THING, and many more. With first person accounts from pioneers in the field, as well as papers by artists, scholars, and curators, _Social Media Archeology and Poetics_ documents how these platforms were vital components of early social networking and important in the development of new media and electronic literature. It describes platforms that allowed artists and musicians to share and publish their work, community networking diversity, and the creation of footholds for the arts and humanities online. And _ _it _ _invites comparisons of social media in the past and present, asking: What can we learn from early social media that will inspire us to envision a greater cultural presence on contemporary social media? **Contributors**Madeline Gonzalez Allen, James Blustein, Hank Bull, Annick Bureaud, J. R. Carpenter, Paul E. Ceruzzi, Anna Couey, Amanda McDonald Crowley, Steve Dietz, Judith Donath, Steven Durland, Lee Felsenstein, Susanne Gerber, Ann-Barbara Graff, Dene Grigar, Stacy Horn, Antoinette LaFarge, Deena Larsen, Gary O. Larson, Alan Liu, Geert Lovink, Richard Lowenberg, Judy Malloy, Scott McPhee, Julianne Nyhan, Howard Rheingold, Randy Ross, Wolfgang Staehle, Fred Truck, Rob Wittig, David R. Woolley

  • Network and Other Project Acronyms

    Between 1959 and 1989, Soviet scientists and officials made numerous attempts to network their nation -- to construct a nationwide computer network. None of these attempts succeeded, and the enterprise had been abandoned by the time the Soviet Union fell apart. Meanwhile, ARPANET, the American precursor to the Internet, went online in 1969. Why did the Soviet network, with top-level scientists and patriotic incentives, fail while the American network succeeded? In _How Not to Network a Nation_, Benjamin Peters reverses the usual cold war dualities and argues that the American ARPANET took shape thanks to well-managed state subsidies and collaborative research environments and the Soviet network projects stumbled because of unregulated competition among self-interested institutions, bureaucrats, and others. The capitalists behaved like socialists while the socialists behaved like capitalists. After examining the midcentury rise of cybernetics, the science of self- governi g systems, and the emergence in the Soviet Union of economic cybernetics, Peters complicates this uneasy role reversal while chronicling the various Soviet attempts to build a "unified information network." Drawing on previously unknown archival and historical materials, he focuses on the final, and most ambitious of these projects, the All-State Automated System of Management (OGAS), and its principal promoter, Viktor M. Glushkov. Peters describes the rise and fall of OGAS -- its theoretical and practical reach, its vision of a national economy managed by network, the bureaucratic obstacles it encountered, and the institutional stalemate that killed it. Finally, he considers the implications of the Soviet experience for today's networked world.

  • “Opening the Door to Cyberspace”

    Focusing on early social media in the arts and humanities and on the core role of creative computer scientists, artists, and scholars in shaping the pre-Web social media landscape, _Social Media Archeology and Poetics_ documents social media lineage, beginning in the 1970s with collaborative ARPANET research, Community Memory,??PLATO, Minitel, and ARTEX and continuing into the 1980s and beyond with the Electronic Caf??, Art Com Electronic Network, Arts Wire, The THING, and many more. With first person accounts from pioneers in the field, as well as papers by artists, scholars, and curators, _Social Media Archeology and Poetics_ documents how these platforms were vital components of early social networking and important in the development of new media and electronic literature. It describes platforms that allowed artists and musicians to share and publish their work, community networking diversity, and the creation of footholds for the arts and humanities online. And _ _it _ _invites comparisons of social media in the past and present, asking: What can we learn from early social media that will inspire us to envision a greater cultural presence on contemporary social media? **Contributors**Madeline Gonzalez Allen, James Blustein, Hank Bull, Annick Bureaud, J. R. Carpenter, Paul E. Ceruzzi, Anna Couey, Amanda McDonald Crowley, Steve Dietz, Judith Donath, Steven Durland, Lee Felsenstein, Susanne Gerber, Ann-Barbara Graff, Dene Grigar, Stacy Horn, Antoinette LaFarge, Deena Larsen, Gary O. Larson, Alan Liu, Geert Lovink, Richard Lowenberg, Judy Malloy, Scott McPhee, Julianne Nyhan, Howard Rheingold, Randy Ross, Wolfgang Staehle, Fred Truck, Rob Wittig, David R. Woolley

  • Notes

    The history of computing could be told as the story of hardware and software, or the story of the Internet, or the story of "smart" hand-held devices, with subplots involving IBM, Microsoft, Apple, Facebook, and Twitter. In this concise and accessible account of the invention and development of digital technology, computer historian Paul Ceruzzi offers a broader and more useful perspective. He identifies four major threads that run throughout all of computing's technological development: digitization--the coding of information, computation, and control in binary form, ones and zeros; the convergence of multiple streams of techniques, devices, and machines, yielding more than the sum of their parts; the steady advance of electronic technology, as characterized famously by "Moore's Law"; and the human-machine interface. Ceruzzi guides us through computing history, telling how a Bell Labs mathematician coined the word "digital" in 1942 (to describe a high-speed method of calculating used in anti-aircraft devices), and recounting the development of the punch card (for use in the 1890 U.S. Census). He describes the ENIAC, built for scientific and military applications; the UNIVAC, the first general purpose computer; and ARPANET, the Internet's precursor. Ceruzzi's account traces the world-changing evolution of the computer from a room-size ensemble of machinery to a "minicomputer" to a desktop computer to a pocket-sized smart phone. He describes the development of the silicon chip, which could store ever-increasing amounts of data and enabled ever-decreasing device size. He visits that hotbed of innovation, Silicon Valley, and brings the story up to the present with the Internet, the World Wide Web, and social networking.



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