Agriculture

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Agriculture is the cultivation of animals, plants, fungi and other life forms for food, fiber, and other products used to sustain life. Agriculture was the key implement in the rise of sedentary human civilization, whereby farming of domesticated species created food surpluses that nurtured the development of civilization. (Wikipedia.org)






Conferences related to Agriculture

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IGARSS 2015 - 2015 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium

The Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society (GRSS) seeks to advance science and technology in geoscience, remote sensing and related fields using conferences, education and other resources. Its fields of interest are the theory, concepts and techniques of science and engineering as they apply to the remote sensing of the earth, oceans, atmosphere, and space, as well as the processing, interpretation and dissemination of this information.


2014 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA)

Robotics and Automation


2013 International Conference on Management Science and Engineering (ICMSE)

Management science and engineering, including operations research, organizational systems and behavior, economics and finance, and public administration.


2012 10th World Congress on Intelligent Control and Automation (WCICA 2012)

A. Intelligent Control B. Control Theory and Control Engineering C. Complex Systems and Intelligent Robots D. Others


2012 IEEE 12th International Conference on Bioinformatics & Bioengineering (BIBE)

The annual IEEE International Conference on Bioinformatics and Bioengineering covers complementary disciplines that hold great promise for the advancement of research and development in complex medical and biological systems, agriculture, environment, public health, drug design, and so on.

  • 2011 IEEE 11th International Conference on Bioinformatics & Bioengineering (BIBE)

    The annual IEEE International Conference on Bioinformatics and Bioengineering aims at building synergy between Bioinformatics and Bioengineering, two complementary disciplines that hold great promise for the advancement of research and development in complex medical and biological systems, agriculture, environment, public health, drug design.

  • 2010 International Conference on BioInformatics and BioEngineering (BIBE)

  • 2009 9th IEEE International Conference on BioInformatics and BioEngineering - BIBE

    The annual IEEE International Conference on Bioinformatics and Bioengineering aims at building synergy between Bioinformatics and Bioengineering, two complementary disciplines that hold great promise for the advancement of research and development in complex medical and biological systems, agriculture, environment, public health, drug design. Research and development in these two areas are impacting the science and technology in fields such as medicine, food production, forensics, etc.


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Periodicals related to Agriculture

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Latin America Transactions, IEEE (Revista IEEE America Latina)

The IEEE Region 9 is releasing the IEEE Latin America Transactions to enable the publication of non-published and technically excellent papers from Latin American engineers, in Spanish or Portuguese languages. Engineers and researchers from Portugal and Spain (and others countries with the same language) are also very welcome to submit their proposals.


Pervasive Computing, IEEE

The popularity of mobile Internet access, third- and fourth-generation wireless communication, handheld devices, and Bluetooth have made pervasive computing a reality. To help you keep pace, IEEE Pervasive Computing covers mobile computing, wireless networks, security, scalability, intelligent vehicles and environments, and pervasive computing applications.




Xplore Articles related to Agriculture

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Detection of Damaged Cottonseeds Using Machine Vision

Liu Shaojun; Wang Ku Information Technology and Applications, 2009. IFITA '09. International Forum on, 2009

Damaged cottonseeds has a disadvantageous influence on cotton yields. The traditional detection of cottonseeds depends on just labor, which is tedious and variant with different operator. An automatic detection system based on machine vision was designed to distinguish the sound cottonseeds from the damaged ones. The objective of this study is to develop image processing algorithms to finish picking out ...


Empirical analysis of stock returns volatility in China market based on Shanghai and Shenzhen 300 Index

Wenrong Pan Financial Theory and Engineering (ICFTE), 2010 International Conference on, 2010

Based on Shanghai and Shenzhen 300 Index, this paper firstly uses such GARCH family models as EGARCH, TGARCH, etc to analyze the volatility of the stock returns series of A share in China. In conclusion, the stock returns series is stationary and has a outstanding ARCH effect. There is a volatility clusters in China stock market. Moreover, a negative shock ...


Source Camera Identification in Real Practice: A Preliminary Experimentation

Aniello Castiglione; Giuseppe Cattaneo; Maurizio Cembalo; Umberto Ferraro Petrillo Broadband, Wireless Computing, Communication and Applications (BWCCA), 2010 International Conference on, 2010

In this paper, an experimental evaluation of one of the most effective source camera identification techniques proposed so far, by Lukáš et al., is presented. This method uses the characteristic noise left by the sensor on a digital picture as a fingerprint in order to identify the source camera used to take the picture. The aim of the experiments is ...


Regional Effects of Secondary Ecological Migration in Pasturing Area: A Case of Fuhai County in Xinjiang

Changlong Sun; Jia Liu; Xiaolei Zhang; Hongru Du; Wenwen Ma Environmental Science and Information Application Technology, 2009. ESIAT 2009. International Conference on, 2009

Under the integrated influences of global climate changes and overgrazing, China rangeland has degraded over recent years. Fuhai County is located in the north margin of Junggar basin and its range land has experienced expansive degradation. The eco-migration policy are launched respectively by local government in 1998 and 2006. In order to analyze the regional effects of ecological migration, we ...


Gender differentials in wage and employment opportunity in urban labor market

Kang-yin Lu; Pan Hu; Li Zhang 2009 International Conference on Management Science and Engineering, 2009

The gender wage differentials in urban labor market were investigated according to the microcosmic-surveyed data in Jilin Province in 2007. It was found that the industry distribution of male-female employment structure is unbalanced, namely the employment opportunity is unequal as far as gender concerned. Firstly, Mincer Wage Equation was estimated for both male and female according to the microcosmic-surveyed data. ...


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Educational Resources on Agriculture

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eLearning

Detection of Damaged Cottonseeds Using Machine Vision

Liu Shaojun; Wang Ku Information Technology and Applications, 2009. IFITA '09. International Forum on, 2009

Damaged cottonseeds has a disadvantageous influence on cotton yields. The traditional detection of cottonseeds depends on just labor, which is tedious and variant with different operator. An automatic detection system based on machine vision was designed to distinguish the sound cottonseeds from the damaged ones. The objective of this study is to develop image processing algorithms to finish picking out ...


Empirical analysis of stock returns volatility in China market based on Shanghai and Shenzhen 300 Index

Wenrong Pan Financial Theory and Engineering (ICFTE), 2010 International Conference on, 2010

Based on Shanghai and Shenzhen 300 Index, this paper firstly uses such GARCH family models as EGARCH, TGARCH, etc to analyze the volatility of the stock returns series of A share in China. In conclusion, the stock returns series is stationary and has a outstanding ARCH effect. There is a volatility clusters in China stock market. Moreover, a negative shock ...


Source Camera Identification in Real Practice: A Preliminary Experimentation

Aniello Castiglione; Giuseppe Cattaneo; Maurizio Cembalo; Umberto Ferraro Petrillo Broadband, Wireless Computing, Communication and Applications (BWCCA), 2010 International Conference on, 2010

In this paper, an experimental evaluation of one of the most effective source camera identification techniques proposed so far, by Lukáš et al., is presented. This method uses the characteristic noise left by the sensor on a digital picture as a fingerprint in order to identify the source camera used to take the picture. The aim of the experiments is ...


Regional Effects of Secondary Ecological Migration in Pasturing Area: A Case of Fuhai County in Xinjiang

Changlong Sun; Jia Liu; Xiaolei Zhang; Hongru Du; Wenwen Ma Environmental Science and Information Application Technology, 2009. ESIAT 2009. International Conference on, 2009

Under the integrated influences of global climate changes and overgrazing, China rangeland has degraded over recent years. Fuhai County is located in the north margin of Junggar basin and its range land has experienced expansive degradation. The eco-migration policy are launched respectively by local government in 1998 and 2006. In order to analyze the regional effects of ecological migration, we ...


Gender differentials in wage and employment opportunity in urban labor market

Kang-yin Lu; Pan Hu; Li Zhang 2009 International Conference on Management Science and Engineering, 2009

The gender wage differentials in urban labor market were investigated according to the microcosmic-surveyed data in Jilin Province in 2007. It was found that the industry distribution of male-female employment structure is unbalanced, namely the employment opportunity is unequal as far as gender concerned. Firstly, Mincer Wage Equation was estimated for both male and female according to the microcosmic-surveyed data. ...


More eLearning Resources

IEEE-USA E-Books

  • China's Soil-Agriculture Interactions

    This chapter contains section titled: Simultaneous Feedbacks: The Conceptual Task, Designing a Simultaneous System to Fit China in the 1980s, The Determinants of Agricultural Yields, Feedbacks from Agriculture to the Soil

  • Conclusions and Implications

    In this book Peter Lindert evaluates environmental concerns about soil degradation in two very large countries--China and Indonesia--where anecdotal evidence has suggested serious problems. Lindert does what no scholar before him has done: using new archival data sets, he measures changes in soil productivity over long enough periods of time to reveal the influence of human activity.China and Indonesia are good test cases because of their geography and history. China has been at the center of global concerns about desertification and water erosion, which it may have accelerated with intense agriculture. Most of Indonesia¹s lands were created by volcanoes and erosion, and its rapid deforestation and shifting slash-burn agriculture have been singled out for international censure.Lindert's investigation suggests that human mismanagement is not on average worsening the soil quality in China and Indonesia. Human cultivation lowers soil nitrogen and organic matter, but has offsetting positive effects. Economic development and rising incomes may even lead to better soil. Beyond the importance of Lindert's immediate findings, this book opens a new area of study--quantitative soil history--and raises the standard for debating soil trends.

  • Selected Abbreviations, Acronyms, and Symbols

    Energy in Nature and Society is a systematic and exhaustive analysis of all the major energy sources, storages, flows, and conversions that have shaped the evolution of the biosphere and civilization. Vaclav Smil uses fundamental unifying metrics (most notably for power density and energy intensity) to provide an integrated framework for analyzing all segments of energetics (the study of energy flows and their transformations). The book explores not only planetary energetics (such as solar radiation and geomorphic processes) and bioenergetics (photosynthesis, for example) but also human energetics (such as metabolism and thermoregulation), tracing them from hunter-gatherer and agricultural societies through modern-day industrial civilization. Included are chapters on heterotrophic conversions, traditional agriculture, preindustrial complexification, fossil fuels, fossil-fueled civilization, the energetics of food, and the implications of energetics for the environment. The book concludes with an examination of general patterns, trends, and socioeconomic considerations of energy use today, looking at correlations between energy and value, energy and the economy, energy and quality of life, and energy futures. Throughout the book, Smil chooses to emphasize the complexities and peculiarities of the real world, and the counterintuitive outcomes of many of its processes, over abstract models. Energy in Nature and Society provides a unique, comprehensive, single-volume analysis and reference source on all important energy matters, from natural to industrial energy flows, from fuels to food, from the Earth's formation to possible energy futures, and can serve as a text for courses in energy studies, global ecology, earth systems science, biology, and chemistry. Vaclav Smil is Distinguished Professor at the University of Manitoba and the author of many books, including Energy at the Crossroads (2003), The Earth's Biosphere: Evolution, Dynamics, and Change (2002), and Energies: An Illustrated Guide to the Biosphere and Civilization (1998), all of which are published by The MIT Press.

  • Indonesia

    In this book Peter Lindert evaluates environmental concerns about soil degradation in two very large countries--China and Indonesia--where anecdotal evidence has suggested serious problems. Lindert does what no scholar before him has done: using new archival data sets, he measures changes in soil productivity over long enough periods of time to reveal the influence of human activity.China and Indonesia are good test cases because of their geography and history. China has been at the center of global concerns about desertification and water erosion, which it may have accelerated with intense agriculture. Most of Indonesia¹s lands were created by volcanoes and erosion, and its rapid deforestation and shifting slash-burn agriculture have been singled out for international censure.Lindert's investigation suggests that human mismanagement is not on average worsening the soil quality in China and Indonesia. Human cultivation lowers soil nitrogen and organic matter, but has offsetting positive effects. Economic development and rising incomes may even lead to better soil. Beyond the importance of Lindert's immediate findings, this book opens a new area of study--quantitative soil history--and raises the standard for debating soil trends.

  • Appendix A: Full Soil History Regression Equations for China, 1930s–1980s

    In this book Peter Lindert evaluates environmental concerns about soil degradation in two very large countries--China and Indonesia--where anecdotal evidence has suggested serious problems. Lindert does what no scholar before him has done: using new archival data sets, he measures changes in soil productivity over long enough periods of time to reveal the influence of human activity.China and Indonesia are good test cases because of their geography and history. China has been at the center of global concerns about desertification and water erosion, which it may have accelerated with intense agriculture. Most of Indonesia¹s lands were created by volcanoes and erosion, and its rapid deforestation and shifting slash-burn agriculture have been singled out for international censure.Lindert's investigation suggests that human mismanagement is not on average worsening the soil quality in China and Indonesia. Human cultivation lowers soil nitrogen and organic matter, but has offsetting positive effects. Economic development and rising incomes may even lead to better soil. Beyond the importance of Lindert's immediate findings, this book opens a new area of study--quantitative soil history--and raises the standard for debating soil trends.

  • Judging Soil Trends

    In this book Peter Lindert evaluates environmental concerns about soil degradation in two very large countries--China and Indonesia--where anecdotal evidence has suggested serious problems. Lindert does what no scholar before him has done: using new archival data sets, he measures changes in soil productivity over long enough periods of time to reveal the influence of human activity.China and Indonesia are good test cases because of their geography and history. China has been at the center of global concerns about desertification and water erosion, which it may have accelerated with intense agriculture. Most of Indonesia¹s lands were created by volcanoes and erosion, and its rapid deforestation and shifting slash-burn agriculture have been singled out for international censure.Lindert's investigation suggests that human mismanagement is not on average worsening the soil quality in China and Indonesia. Human cultivation lowers soil nitrogen and organic matter, but has offsetting positive effects. Economic development and rising incomes may even lead to better soil. Beyond the importance of Lindert's immediate findings, this book opens a new area of study--quantitative soil history--and raises the standard for debating soil trends.

  • References

    Energy in Nature and Society is a systematic and exhaustive analysis of all the major energy sources, storages, flows, and conversions that have shaped the evolution of the biosphere and civilization. Vaclav Smil uses fundamental unifying metrics (most notably for power density and energy intensity) to provide an integrated framework for analyzing all segments of energetics (the study of energy flows and their transformations). The book explores not only planetary energetics (such as solar radiation and geomorphic processes) and bioenergetics (photosynthesis, for example) but also human energetics (such as metabolism and thermoregulation), tracing them from hunter-gatherer and agricultural societies through modern-day industrial civilization. Included are chapters on heterotrophic conversions, traditional agriculture, preindustrial complexification, fossil fuels, fossil-fueled civilization, the energetics of food, and the implications of energetics for the environment. The book concludes with an examination of general patterns, trends, and socioeconomic considerations of energy use today, looking at correlations between energy and value, energy and the economy, energy and quality of life, and energy futures. Throughout the book, Smil chooses to emphasize the complexities and peculiarities of the real world, and the counterintuitive outcomes of many of its processes, over abstract models. Energy in Nature and Society provides a unique, comprehensive, single-volume analysis and reference source on all important energy matters, from natural to industrial energy flows, from fuels to food, from the Earth's formation to possible energy futures, and can serve as a text for courses in energy studies, global ecology, earth systems science, biology, and chemistry. Vaclav Smil is Distinguished Professor at the University of Manitoba and the author of many books, including Energy at the Crossroads (2003), The Earth's Biosphere: Evolution, Dynamics, and Change (2002), and Energies: An Illustrated Guide to the Biosphere and Civilization (1998), all of which are published by The MIT Press.

  • China

    In this book Peter Lindert evaluates environmental concerns about soil degradation in two very large countries--China and Indonesia--where anecdotal evidence has suggested serious problems. Lindert does what no scholar before him has done: using new archival data sets, he measures changes in soil productivity over long enough periods of time to reveal the influence of human activity.China and Indonesia are good test cases because of their geography and history. China has been at the center of global concerns about desertification and water erosion, which it may have accelerated with intense agriculture. Most of Indonesia¹s lands were created by volcanoes and erosion, and its rapid deforestation and shifting slash-burn agriculture have been singled out for international censure.Lindert's investigation suggests that human mismanagement is not on average worsening the soil quality in China and Indonesia. Human cultivation lowers soil nitrogen and organic matter, but has offsetting positive effects. Economic development and rising incomes may even lead to better soil. Beyond the importance of Lindert's immediate findings, this book opens a new area of study--quantitative soil history--and raises the standard for debating soil trends.

  • A Systems Framework For Sustainability

    This chapter approaches sustainability as an emergent holistic property of hard, soft, or hybrid systems including large and often complex system of systems. In the concept of sustainable systems within the realm of Gaia, such attributes should include energy, natural resources and ecosystem dependencies, environmental stability, technology safety and security and dependability, biodiversity, resource cycling, human-nature interactive complexity and biogeochemical cycles. A large and complex system of systems can possess a wide range of sustainability qualities at macro level. The systems framework is developed and represented in weighted factors analysis methodology (WeFA). The macro concept of a sustainable system is qualitatively assessed for the sustainability of macro systems, such as global economic system, environmental system, transportation system, information system, agriculture system, energy and global climate system. The chapter focuses on investing in network security that should always seek to move the organization nearer to securing the entire network.

  • Index

    Our contemporary concerns about food range from food security to agricultural sustainability to getting dinner on the table for family and friends. This book investigates food issues as they intersect with participatory Internet culture -- blogs, wikis, online photo- and video-sharing platforms, and social networks -- in efforts to bring about a healthy, socially inclusive, and sustainable food future. Focusing on our urban environments provisioned with digital and network capacities, and drawing on such "bottom-up" sociotechnical trends as DIY and open source, the chapters describe engagements with food and technology that engender (re-)creative interactions. In the first section, "Eat," contributors discuss technology-aided approaches to sustainable dining, including digital communication between farmers and urban consumers and a "telematic" dinner party at which guests are present electronically. The chapters in "Cook" describe, among other things, "smart" chopping boards that encourage mindful eating and a website that supports urban wild fruit foraging. Finally, "Grow" connects human-computer interaction with achieving a secure, safe, and ethical food supply, offering chapters on the use of interactive technologies in urban agriculture, efforts to trace the provenance of food with a "Fair Tracing" tool, and other projects. ContributorsJoon Sang Baek, Pollie Barden, Eric P. S. Baumer, Eli Blevis, Nick Bryan-Kinns, Robert Comber, Jean Duruz, Katharina Frosch, Anne Galloway, Geri Gay, Jordan Geiger, Gijs Geleijnse, Nina Gros, Penny Hagen, Megan Halpern, Greg Hearn, Tad Hirsch, Jettie Hoonhout, Denise Kera, Vera Khovanskaya, Ann Light, Bernt Meerbeek, William Odom, Kenton O'Hara, Charles Spence, Mirjam Struppek, Esther Toet, Marc Tuters, Katharine S. Willis, David L. Wright, Grant Young



Standards related to Agriculture

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No standards are currently tagged "Agriculture"