Archaea

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The Archaea are a group of single-celled microorganisms. (Wikipedia.org)






Conferences related to Archaea

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Oceans 2020 MTS/IEEE GULF COAST

To promote awareness, understanding, advancement and application of ocean engineering and marine technology. This includes all aspects of science, engineering, and technology that address research, development, and operations pertaining to all bodies of water. This includes the creation of new capabilities and technologies from concept design through prototypes, testing, and operational systems to sense, explore, understand, develop, use, and responsibly manage natural resources.

  • OCEANS 2018 MTS/IEEE Charleston

    Ocean, coastal, and atmospheric science and technology advances and applications

  • OCEANS 2017 - Anchorage

    Papers on ocean technology, exhibits from ocean equipment and service suppliers, student posters and student poster competition, tutorials on ocean technology, workshops and town meetings on policy and governmental process.

  • OCEANS 2016

    The Marine Technology Scociety and the Oceanic Engineering Society of the IEEE cosponor a joint annual conference and exposition on ocean science, engineering, and policy. The OCEANS conference covers four days. One day for tutorials and three for approx. 500 technical papers and 150 -200 exhibits.

  • OCEANS 2015

    The Marine Technology Scociety and the Oceanic Engineering Society of the IEEE cosponor a joint annual conference and exposition on ocean science, engineering, and policy. The OCEANS conference covers four days. One day for tutorials and three for approx. 450 technical papers and 150-200 exhibits.

  • OCEANS 2014

    The OCEANS conference covers four days. One day for tutorials and three for approx. 450 technical papers and 150-200 exhibits.

  • OCEANS 2013

    Three days of 8-10 tracks of technical sessions (400-450 papers) and concurent exhibition (150-250 exhibitors)

  • OCEANS 2012

    Ocean related technology. Tutorials and three days of technical sessions and exhibits. 8-12 parallel technical tracks.

  • OCEANS 2011

    The Marine Technology Society and the Oceanic Engineering Scociety of the IEEE cosponsor a joint annual conference and exposition on ocean science engineering, and policy.

  • OCEANS 2010

    The Marine Technology Society and the Oceanic Engineering Scociety of the IEEE cosponsor a joint annual conference and exposition on ocean science engineering, and policy.

  • OCEANS 2009

  • OCEANS 2008

    The Marine Technology Society (MTS) and the Oceanic Engineering Society (OES) of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) cosponsor a joint conference and exposition on ocean science, engineering, education, and policy. Held annually in the fall, it has become a focal point for the ocean and marine community to meet, learn, and exhibit products and services. The conference includes technical sessions, workshops, student poster sessions, job fairs, tutorials and a large exhibit.

  • OCEANS 2007

  • OCEANS 2006

  • OCEANS 2005

  • OCEANS 2004

  • OCEANS 2003

  • OCEANS 2002

  • OCEANS 2001

  • OCEANS 2000

  • OCEANS '99

  • OCEANS '98

  • OCEANS '97

  • OCEANS '96


2019 IEEE 58th Conference on Decision and Control (CDC)

The CDC is recognized as the premier scientific and engineering conference dedicated to the advancement of the theory and practice of systems and control. The CDC annually brings together an international community of researchers and practitioners in the field of automatic control to discuss new research results, perspectives on future developments, and innovative applications relevant to decision making, systems and control, and related areas.The 58th CDC will feature contributed and invited papers, as well as workshops and may include tutorial sessions.The IEEE CDC is hosted by the IEEE Control Systems Society (CSS) in cooperation with the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM), the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS), the Japanese Society for Instrument and Control Engineers (SICE), and the European Union Control Association (EUCA).


2018 IEEE 18th International Conference on Bioinformatics and Bioengineering (BIBE)

The series of BIBE Conferences was initiated in 2000 and is the first of its kind in IEEE inspiringothers to follow its path. The 18th annual IEEE International Conference on Bioinformatics andBioengineering aims at building synergy between Bioinformatics and Bioengineering, twocomplementary disciplines that hold great promise for the advancement of research anddevelopment in complex medical and biological systems, agriculture, environment, publichealth, drug design. Research and development in these two areas are impacting the scienceand technology in fields such as medicine, food production, forensics, etc. by advancingfundamental concepts in molecular biology, by helping us understand living organisms atmultiple levels, by developing innovative implants and bio-prosthetics, and by improving toolsand techniques for the detection, prevention and treatment of diseases.


2018 IEEE 18th International Conference on Nanotechnology (IEEE-NANO)

Nanotechnology


2018 IEEE PES Asia-Pacific Power and Energy Engineering Conference (APPEEC)

This highly-regarded conference sponsored by IEEE’s Power & Energy Society aims to provide a premier platform for electrical engineers and scientists in universities, research centers and industry to present their works and to share experiences and ideas in the area of power and energy engineering. Attendees are provided with an unparalleled opportunity to interface with experts from all related fields including, but not limited to, power generation, power system management, power transmission and distribution, and smart grid technologies


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Periodicals related to Archaea

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Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, IEEE/ACM Transactions on

Specific topics of interest include, but are not limited to, sequence analysis, comparison and alignment methods; motif, gene and signal recognition; molecular evolution; phylogenetics and phylogenomics; determination or prediction of the structure of RNA and Protein in two and three dimensions; DNA twisting and folding; gene expression and gene regulatory networks; deduction of metabolic pathways; micro-array design and analysis; proteomics; ...


Semiconductor Manufacturing, IEEE Transactions on

Addresses innovations of interest to the integrated circuit manufacturing researcher and professional. Includes advanced process control, equipment modeling and control, yield analysis and optimization, defect control, and manufacturability improvement. It also addresses factory modelling and simulation, production planning and scheduling, as well as environmental issues in semiconductor manufacturing.


Spectrum, IEEE

IEEE Spectrum Magazine, the flagship publication of the IEEE, explores the development, applications and implications of new technologies. It anticipates trends in engineering, science, and technology, and provides a forum for understanding, discussion and leadership in these areas. IEEE Spectrum is the world's leading engineering and scientific magazine. Read by over 300,000 engineers worldwide, Spectrum provides international coverage of all ...



Most published Xplore authors for Archaea

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Xplore Articles related to Archaea

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Purification and characterization of Archaeoglobus fulgidus shikimate 5-dehydrogenase

Proceedings of the Second Joint 24th Annual Conference and the Annual Fall Meeting of the Biomedical Engineering Society] [Engineering in Medicine and Biology, 2002

Shikimate 5-dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.25) is an important enzyme of the aromatic amino acid biosynthesis pathway. The shikimate 5-dehydrogenase (SDH) gene from the hyperthermophile Archaeoglobus fulgidus was PCR cloned and over-expressed in E. coli. The resulting recombinant enzyme with a M/sub r/ of 27,000 was purified to homogeneity. The enzyme had a specific activity of 727 U/mg at 87/spl deg/C, and ...


Life and death of coral reefs: a microbial view

Oceans 2003. Celebrating the Past ... Teaming Toward the Future (IEEE Cat. No.03CH37492), 2003

Summary form only given. Until recently, the influence of microbes on coral reef function has been under-appreciated, even though it is widely recognized that bacteria, archaea, and unicellular eukaryotes are vital components of all marine ecosystems. A number of studies have begun to use modern microbial ecology methods to study coral reefs and examine the microbes living with reef organisms. ...


Non-AUG initiation codon and downstream inframe AUG in Pyrococcus Horikoshii: Evaluating two hypotheses

2011 5th International Conference on Bioinformatics and Biomedical Engineering, 2011

Non-AUG initiation codons in protein-coding genes in Pyrococcus horikoshii are associated with the presence of a downstream inframe AUG typically at the 4th codon, i.e., at the 9<sup>th</sup> nucleotide site when the 1<sup>st</sup> coding nucleotide is labeled 0. Here we report that the presence of this downstream codon depends not only on the presence/absence of the initiation AUG, but also ...


Distribution of Protein Superfamilies in the Three Superkingdoms of Life

2008 2nd International Conference on Bioinformatics and Biomedical Engineering, 2008

The Superfamily database provides structural assignments to protein sequences. This assignment enable us to analyze the distribution of specific superfamilies within and across the genomes. Here, we focus on the distributions of superfamilies in archaeal, bacterial and eukaryotic genomes. The distribution of the most common superfamilies in archaea and bacteria are very similar (6 of the top 10 superfamilies are ...


The psychrophilic methanogens application in anaerobic biological treatment and research on cold-adapted mechanism

2011 Second International Conference on Mechanic Automation and Control Engineering, 2011

Anaerobic digestion technology of organic waste is considered sustainable and optimum. However, the process of anaerobic digestion at mesophilic and thermophilic temperatures is well understood and applied, psychrophilic temperatures treatment has not been explored widely which could reduce operation cost considerably. This review states the research progress and cold-adapted mechanism of psychrophilic methanogens. Moreover, some new research theory and technology ...


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Educational Resources on Archaea

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IEEE.tv Videos

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IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Purification and characterization of Archaeoglobus fulgidus shikimate 5-dehydrogenase

    Shikimate 5-dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.25) is an important enzyme of the aromatic amino acid biosynthesis pathway. The shikimate 5-dehydrogenase (SDH) gene from the hyperthermophile Archaeoglobus fulgidus was PCR cloned and over-expressed in E. coli. The resulting recombinant enzyme with a M/sub r/ of 27,000 was purified to homogeneity. The enzyme had a specific activity of 727 U/mg at 87/spl deg/C, and exhibited K/sub m/s for shikimate and NADP/sup +/ of 0.17 /spl plusmn/ 0.03 mM and 0.19 /spl plusmn/ 0.01, respectively. At 87/spl deg/C, the half life of the SDH was 2 hours. At 60/spl deg/C and a specific activity of 104 U/mg, the half life was 17 days. The combination of high stability and activity for this archaeal SDH may make it useful for industrial chiral synthesis.

  • Life and death of coral reefs: a microbial view

    Summary form only given. Until recently, the influence of microbes on coral reef function has been under-appreciated, even though it is widely recognized that bacteria, archaea, and unicellular eukaryotes are vital components of all marine ecosystems. A number of studies have begun to use modern microbial ecology methods to study coral reefs and examine the microbes living with reef organisms. These new avenues of research are changing our views of how coral reefs function. The microbial communities associated with corals are extremely diverse and mostly novel. In addition, there appear to be specific relationships between corals and certain bacterial species or groups. These specific associations are maintained over space and time, demonstrating that coral species have distinct microbiota. It has become clear that coral reefs represent landscapes of ecologically structured prokaryotic communities. Identifying coral-associated microbes and characterizing their interactions with the coral host is critical for understanding the biology of coral reefs. Here I present models explaining how microbes structure healthy coral reefs, as well as propose mechanisms by which microbialization is destroying these ecosystems.

  • Non-AUG initiation codon and downstream inframe AUG in Pyrococcus Horikoshii: Evaluating two hypotheses

    Non-AUG initiation codons in protein-coding genes in Pyrococcus horikoshii are associated with the presence of a downstream inframe AUG typically at the 4th codon, i.e., at the 9<sup>th</sup> nucleotide site when the 1<sup>st</sup> coding nucleotide is labeled 0. Here we report that the presence of this downstream codon depends not only on the presence/absence of the initiation AUG, but also on the strength of binding between the Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence in the 5'-UTR of mRNA and the anti-SD sequence in the 16S rRNA. Weak binding significantly increases the likelihood of having the downstream AUG. Genes with a GUG initiation codon have weaker binding and a high proportion of them have the downstream AUG. Deviation of the SD sequence from the optimal location also appears to increase the likelihood of the downstream AUG.

  • Distribution of Protein Superfamilies in the Three Superkingdoms of Life

    The Superfamily database provides structural assignments to protein sequences. This assignment enable us to analyze the distribution of specific superfamilies within and across the genomes. Here, we focus on the distributions of superfamilies in archaeal, bacterial and eukaryotic genomes. The distribution of the most common superfamilies in archaea and bacteria are very similar (6 of the top 10 superfamilies are the same) but distinct in eukaryotes. But there is only p-loop superfamily in the top 10 superfamilies in the three superkingdoms. When the total number of domains in a genome is larger, duplication of the 6 common superfamilies in archaea and bacteria are more but relative abundant distribution is lower. This phenomenon is more obvious in metazoa. The 6 superfamilies occur almost in all discussial completed genomes, and the structures are lined to <sup>alpha/beta</sup> structural class, and their functions are mainly enzyme. So these superfamilies are important for more genomes, even eukaryote genome, although these superfamilies are not mainly duplicated in eukaryote genomes.

  • The psychrophilic methanogens application in anaerobic biological treatment and research on cold-adapted mechanism

    Anaerobic digestion technology of organic waste is considered sustainable and optimum. However, the process of anaerobic digestion at mesophilic and thermophilic temperatures is well understood and applied, psychrophilic temperatures treatment has not been explored widely which could reduce operation cost considerably. This review states the research progress and cold-adapted mechanism of psychrophilic methanogens. Moreover, some new research theory and technology on psychrophilic methanogens were proposed. The application and prospect of anaerobic digestion at low temperature were also discussed.

  • Protein classification into domains of life using Markov chain models

    It has recently been shown that oligopeptide composition allows clustering proteomes of different organisms into the main domains of life. In this paper, we go a step further by showing that, given a single protein, it is possible to predict whether it has a bacterial or eukaryotic origin with 85% accuracy, and we obtain this result after ensuring that no important homologies exist between the sequences in the test set and the sequences in the training set. To do this, we model the sequence as a Markov chain. A bacterial and an eukaryote model are produced using the training sets. Each input sequence is then classified by calculating the log-odds ratio of the sequence probability for each model. By analyzing the models obtained we extract a set of most discriminant oligopeptides, many of which are part of known functional motifs.

  • Evolution of protein architectures inferred from phylogenomic analysis of CATH

    Protein architecture refers to similar secondary structural arrangements irrespective of their connectivity. Here we aim to explore the evolution of protein architectures by benchmarking CATH and SCOP annotations. For example, we explore the appearance and diversification of protein architectures such as sandwiches, bundles, barrels, solenoids, ribbons, trefoils, prisms and propellers. Structural phylogenies generated at CATH “A”, “T” and “H” levels of structural abstraction revealed patterns of reductive evolution and three epochs in the evolution of protein world. Although CATH and SCOP differ significantly in their protein domain definitions and in the hierarchical partitioning of fold space, our findings strongly support the fact that both protein structural classification systems classify a protein on a very similar theoretical basis by taking into account their structural, functional and evolutionary roles. The tree of “A” showed that the 3-layer (aba) sandwich (3.40), the orthogonal bundle (1.10) and the alpha-beta complex (3.90) harbor simple secondary structure arrangements that are the most ancient, popular and abundant architectures in the protein world.

  • Some aspects of measurements of relaxation properties of cartilage membrane

    The cartilage membrane of the human ear constitutes lipoproteins in bulk phases. The hydrophobic linkage of the polar heads of the lipids undergo spatial orientation in the presence of electrical stimuli both in bulk phases and in chloroform solvent. The relaxation properties of the human cartilage membranes for both males and females of age groups 20 years and 40 years have been found out in the present experiment with the help of a LCR meter (HP 4284A) programmed in the audio frequency range. It is interesting to note that the relaxation time constant increases with ageing of the membrane. The data obtained from the experimental setup comprising a three electrode system are corroborated satisfactorily for evaluation of the relaxation of the cartilage membrane.

  • A graph analysis method to detect metabolic sub-networks based on phylogenetic profile

    To elucidate fundamental constituting principle of functional modules or building blocks of metabolic networks, computational methods to analyze the network structure of metabolism are getting much attention. We propose a graph search method to extract highly conserved sub-networks of metabolic networks based on phylogenetic profile. We formulated reaction-conservation score for the measure of the phylogenetic conservation of reactions. We also formulated compound-conservation score to eliminate biologically-meaningless compounds and reduce the size of the networks. By applying our approach to the metabolic networks of 19 representative organisms selected from bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes in the KEGG database, we detected some highly conserved sub- networks among the organisms. Comparing them to the metabolic maps in KEGG, we found they were mainly included in energy metabolism, sugar metabolism, and amino acid metabolism.

  • Lacunarity Analysis of Genomic Sequences: A Potential Bio-Sequence Analysis Method

    This paper proposes the use of lacunarity analysis of genomic sequences as a potential bio-sequence analysis method. In the present work the fractal property of DNA sequences is confirmed using the lacunarity analysis of their Chaos Game Representation matrices. In another study, the distribution of various n-mers in a genomic sequence is investigated based on the lacunarity analysis of one-dimensional representation of the indicator sequences of n-mers. One key finding from this study is that stop codon distribution in a genomic sequence, both in prokaryotes as well as eukaryotes, follows a random pattern. Another interesting result out of the present investigations is that lacunarity plot of the indicator sequence of repeating blocks in a tandem repeat sequence follows a similar pattern that of a one dimensional clustered data. This result demonstrates the use of lacunarity analysis in finding the presence of repeated sequences in a genomic sequence. All the results obtained clearly point to the power of lacunarity analysis of genomic sequences as a potential sequence analysis method.



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