Acoustics

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Acoustics is the interdisciplinary science that deals with the study of all mechanical waves in gases, liquids, and solids including vibration, sound, ultrasound and infrasound. (Wikipedia.org)






Conferences related to Acoustics

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ICASSP 2017 - 2017 IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing (ICASSP)

The ICASSP meeting is the world's largest and most comprehensive technical conference focused on signal processing and its applications. The conference will feature world-class speakers, tutorials, exhibits, and over 50 lecture and poster sessions.


2016 IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium (IUS)

International Symposium dealing with recent developments on ultrasound, including ultrasound imaging, transducers, non destructuve testing and physical acoustics.

  • 2015 IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium (IUS)

    Annual meeting of the UFFC Society that is being held regularly. It is focusing on ultrasonics.

  • 2013 IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium (IUS)

    the joint IUS, ISAF, IFC, and EFTF conference is aimed at bringing the ultrasonics, ferroelectrics, Frequency Control and Time Forum communities around the world together more closely and through discussions on recent research and development of fundamentals, materials, devices, and applications .

  • 2012 IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium

    The conference will bring together the community of ultrasonics around the world in the center of Europe for discussion and cooperation and to stimulate the research and development in the widespread field of ultrasonic theories and applications

  • 2011 IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium (IUS)

    The Symposium is aimed at bringing the ultrasonics communities around the world together more closely and through discussions on recent research and development of ultrasonics theories and applications.

  • 2010 IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium (IUS)

    The conference will cover all high frequency Ultrasound application including medical.

  • 2009 IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium

    Conference includes short courses on topics of current interest in ultrasonics. The next three days will include parallel oral and poster sessions covering 1) Medical Ultrasonics, 2) Sensors, NDE & Industrial Applications, 3) Physical Acoustics, 4) Microacoustics SAW, FBAR, MEMS, and 5) Transducers & Transducer Materials.

  • 2008 IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium

  • 2007 IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium

  • 2006 IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium


OCEANS 2016

The Marine Technology Scociety and the Oceanic Engineering Society of the IEEE cosponor a joint annual conference and exposition on ocean science, engineering, and policy. The OCEANS conference covers four days. One day for tutorials and three for approx. 500 technical papers and 150 -200 exhibits.

  • OCEANS 2015 - MTS/IEEE Washington

    The Marine Technology Scociety and the Oceanic Engineering Society of the IEEE cosponor a joint annual conference and exposition on ocean science, engineering, and policy. The OCEANS conference covers four days. One day for tutorials and three for approx. 450 technical papers and 150-200 exhibits.

  • OCEANS 2014

    The OCEANS conference covers four days. One day for tutorials and three for approx. 450 technical papers and 150-200 exhibits.

  • OCEANS 2013

    Three days of 8-10 tracks of technical sessions (400-450 papers) and concurent exhibition (150-250 exhibitors)

  • OCEANS 2012

    Ocean related technology. Tutorials and three days of technical sessions and exhibits. 8-12 parallel technical tracks.

  • OCEANS 2011

    The Marine Technology Society and the Oceanic Engineering Scociety of the IEEE cosponsor a joint annual conference and exposition on ocean science engineering, and policy.

  • OCEANS 2010

    The Marine Technology Society and the Oceanic Engineering Scociety of the IEEE cosponsor a joint annual conference and exposition on ocean science engineering, and policy.

  • OCEANS 2009

  • OCEANS 2008

    The Marine Technology Society (MTS) and the Oceanic Engineering Society (OES) of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) cosponsor a joint conference and exposition on ocean science, engineering, education, and policy. Held annually in the fall, it has become a focal point for the ocean and marine community to meet, learn, and exhibit products and services. The conference includes technical sessions, workshops, student poster sessions, job fairs, tutorials and a large exhibit.

  • OCEANS 2007

  • OCEANS 2006

  • OCEANS 2005


2014 Joint IEEE International Symposium on the Applications of Ferroelectrics, International Workshop on Acoustic Transduction Materials and Devices & Workshop on Piezoresponse Force Microscopy (ISAF/IWATMD/PFM)

This conference covers the development of ferroelectric materials for a wide range of applications, including piezoelectrics, dielectrics, electro-optics, pyroelectrics, flexoelectrics, energy harvesting, non-volatile memory, and logic elements.


OCEANS 2014 - TAIPEI

The OCEANS conference covers all aspects of ocean engineering from physics aspects through development and operation of undersea vehicles and equipment.

  • OCEANS 2013 - NORWAY

    Ocean related technologies. Program includes tutorials, three days of technical papers and a concurrent exhibition. Student poster competition.

  • OCEANS 2012 - YEOSU

    The OCEANS conferences covers four days with tutorials, exhibits and three days of parallel tracks that address all aspects of oceanic engineering.

  • OCEANS 2011 - SPAIN

    All Oceans related technologies.

  • OCEANS 2010 IEEE - Sydney

  • OCEANS 2009 - EUROPE

  • OCEANS 2008 - MTS/IEEE Kobe Techno-Ocean

  • OCEANS 2007 - EUROPE

    The theme 'Marine Challenges: Coastline to Deep Sea' focuses on the significant challenges, from the shallowest waters around our coasts to the deepest subsea trenches, that face marine, subsea and oceanic engineers in their drive to understand the complexities of the world's oceans.

  • OCEANS 2006 - ASIA PACIFIC


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Periodicals related to Acoustics

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Audio, Speech, and Language Processing, IEEE Transactions on

Speech analysis, synthesis, coding speech recognition, speaker recognition, language modeling, speech production and perception, speech enhancement. In audio, transducers, room acoustics, active sound control, human audition, analysis/synthesis/coding of music, and consumer audio. (8) (IEEE Guide for Authors) The scope for the proposed transactions includes SPEECH PROCESSING - Transmission and storage of Speech signals; speech coding; speech enhancement and noise reduction; ...


Magnetics, IEEE Transactions on

Science and technology related to the basic physics and engineering of magnetism, magnetic materials, applied magnetics, magnetic devices, and magnetic data storage. The Transactions publishes scholarly articles of archival value as well as tutorial expositions and critical reviews of classical subjects and topics of current interest.


Oceanic Engineering, IEEE Journal of

Bayes procedures; buried-object detection; dielectric measurements; Doppler measurements; geomagnetism; sea floor; sea ice; sea measurements; sea surface electromagnetic scattering; seismology; sonar; acoustic tomography; underwater acoustics; and underwater radio communication.


Signal Processing Magazine, IEEE

IEEE Signal Processing Magazine is ranked as the number three most-cited journal in Electrical and Electronics Engineering in 2004, according to the annual Journal Citation Report (2004 edition) published by the Institute for Scientific Information. Read more at http://www.ieee.org/products/citations.html. This publication features tutorial style papers on signal processing research and applications. The primary means of communication of the society leadership ...


Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics and Frequency Control, IEEE Transactions on

IEEE Transactions on Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics and Frequency Control was the number-three journal in acoustics in 2002, according to the annual Journal Citation Report (2002 edition) published by the Institute for Scientific Information. This publication focuses on the theory, design, and application on generation, transmission, and detection of bulk and surface mechanical waves; fundamental studies in physical acoustics; design of sonic ...




Xplore Articles related to Acoustics

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Preliminary test and evaluation of non-destructive examination for ITER First Wall development in Korea

Suk-Kwon Kim; Eo Hwak Lee; Jae-Sung Yoon; Hyun-Kyu Jung; Dong Won Lee; Byoung-Yoon Kim 2011 IEEE/NPSS 24th Symposium on Fusion Engineering, 2011

ITER First Wall (FW) includes beryllium armour joined to a Cu heat sink with a stainless steel back plate. These first wall panels are one of the critical components in the ITER tokamak with a maximum surface heat flux of 5 MW/m2. So, a qualification test needs to be performed with the goal to qualify the joining technologies required for ...


Editorial

W. Collins IEEE Transactions on Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing, 1976

First Page of the Article ![](/xploreAssets/images/absImages/01162763.png)


A stability theorem for discrete systems

H. Schussler IEEE Transactions on Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing, 1976

A theorem is presented and proven, dealing with interesting properties of a polynomial D(z), being the denominator of the transfer function of a stable discrete system. The relationships to equivalent properties of a Hurwitz polynomial are considered.


Pipelined Block-Serial Decoder Architecture for Structured Ldpc Codes

T. Bhatt; V. Sundaramurthy; V. Stolpman; D. McCain 2006 IEEE International Conference on Acoustics Speech and Signal Processing Proceedings, 2006

We present a pipelined block-serial decoder architecture for structured LDPC codes, implementing the layered-mode belief-propagation. We introduce the concept of LLR-update and mirror memory to enforce a pipelined decoding schedule. The pipelined architecture improves the latency of the LDPC decoder by about 2x-3x and has negligible performance loss when implemented with clever layer scheduling. We also present a low-complexity check-node ...


The influence of informational masking in complex real-world environments

Adam Westermann; Jörg Buchholz 2013 IEEE Workshop on Applications of Signal Processing to Audio and Acoustics, 2013

Spatial release from masking (SRM) is believed to be an essential auditory mechanism aiding listeners in reverberant multi-talker environments. However, SRM is often measured in simplified spatial configurations using speech corpora with exaggerated talker and/or context confusions. Besides energetic better-ear listening and binaural unmasking, the perceived spatial separation of target and masking speech signals is thought to aid listener's segregation ...


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Educational Resources on Acoustics

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eLearning

Preliminary test and evaluation of non-destructive examination for ITER First Wall development in Korea

Suk-Kwon Kim; Eo Hwak Lee; Jae-Sung Yoon; Hyun-Kyu Jung; Dong Won Lee; Byoung-Yoon Kim 2011 IEEE/NPSS 24th Symposium on Fusion Engineering, 2011

ITER First Wall (FW) includes beryllium armour joined to a Cu heat sink with a stainless steel back plate. These first wall panels are one of the critical components in the ITER tokamak with a maximum surface heat flux of 5 MW/m2. So, a qualification test needs to be performed with the goal to qualify the joining technologies required for ...


Editorial

W. Collins IEEE Transactions on Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing, 1976

First Page of the Article ![](/xploreAssets/images/absImages/01162763.png)


A stability theorem for discrete systems

H. Schussler IEEE Transactions on Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing, 1976

A theorem is presented and proven, dealing with interesting properties of a polynomial D(z), being the denominator of the transfer function of a stable discrete system. The relationships to equivalent properties of a Hurwitz polynomial are considered.


Pipelined Block-Serial Decoder Architecture for Structured Ldpc Codes

T. Bhatt; V. Sundaramurthy; V. Stolpman; D. McCain 2006 IEEE International Conference on Acoustics Speech and Signal Processing Proceedings, 2006

We present a pipelined block-serial decoder architecture for structured LDPC codes, implementing the layered-mode belief-propagation. We introduce the concept of LLR-update and mirror memory to enforce a pipelined decoding schedule. The pipelined architecture improves the latency of the LDPC decoder by about 2x-3x and has negligible performance loss when implemented with clever layer scheduling. We also present a low-complexity check-node ...


The influence of informational masking in complex real-world environments

Adam Westermann; Jörg Buchholz 2013 IEEE Workshop on Applications of Signal Processing to Audio and Acoustics, 2013

Spatial release from masking (SRM) is believed to be an essential auditory mechanism aiding listeners in reverberant multi-talker environments. However, SRM is often measured in simplified spatial configurations using speech corpora with exaggerated talker and/or context confusions. Besides energetic better-ear listening and binaural unmasking, the perceived spatial separation of target and masking speech signals is thought to aid listener's segregation ...


More eLearning Resources

IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Transformations: Studies in the History of Science and Technology

    At the end of the nineteenth century, acoustics was a science of musical sounds; the musically trained ear was the ultimate reference. Just a few decades into the twentieth century, acoustics had undergone a transformation from a scientific field based on the understanding of classical music to one guided by electrical engineering, with industrial and military applications. In this book, Roland Wittje traces this transition, from the late nineteenth- century work of Hermann Helmholtz to the militarized research of World War I and media technology in the 1930s. Wittje shows that physics in the early twentieth century was not only about relativity and atomic structure but encompassed a range of experimental, applied, and industrial research fields. The emergence of technical acoustics and electroacoustics illustrates a scientific field at the intersection of science and technology. Wittje starts with Helmholtz's and Rayleigh's work and its intersection with telegraphy and ear y wireless, and continues with the industrialization of acoustics during World War I, when sound measurement was automated and electrical engineering and radio took over the concept of noise. Researchers no longer appealed to the musically trained ear to understand sound but to the thinking and practices of electrical engineering. Finally, Wittje covers the demilitarization of acoustics during the Weimar Republic and its remilitarization at the beginning of the Third Reich. He shows how technical acoustics fit well with the Nazi dismissal of pure science, representing everything that "German Physics" under National Socialism should be: experimental, applied, and relevant to the military.

  • Acknowledgments

    Leo Beranek, an Iowa farm boy who became a Renaissance man--scientist, inventor, entrepreneur, musician, television executive, philanthropist, and author--has lived life in constant motion. His seventy-year career, through the most tumultuous and transformative years of the last century, has always been propelled by the sheer exhilaration of trying something new. In Riding The Waves, Leo Beranek tells his story. Beranek's life changed direction on a summer day in 1935 when he stopped to help a motorist with a flat tire. The driver just happened to be a former Harvard professor of engineering, who guided the young Beranek toward a full scholarship at Harvard's graduate school of engineering. Beranek went on to be one of the world's leading experts on acoustics. He became Director of Harvard's Electro-Acoustic Laboratory, where he invented the Hush-A-Phone--a telephone accessory that began the chain of regulatory challenges and lawsuits that led ultimately to the breakup of the Bell Telephone monopoly in the 1980s. Beranek moved to MIT to be a professor and Technical Director of its Acoustics Laboratory, then left academia to found the acoustical consulting firm Bolt, Beranek and Newman. Known for his work in noise control and concert acoustics, Beranek devised the world's largest muffler to quiet jet noise and served as acoustical consultant for concert halls around the world (including the Tanglewood Music Shed, the storied summer home of the Boston Symphony Orchestra). As president of BBN, he assembled the software group that invented both the ARPANET, the forerunner of the Internet, and e-mail. In the 1970s, Beranek risked his life savings to secure the license to operate a television station; he turned Channel 5 in Boston into one of the country&# 39;s best, then sold it to Metromedia in 1982 for the highest price ever paid up to that time for a broadcast station. "One central lesson I've learned is the value of risk-taking and of moving on when risks turn into busts or odds look better elsewhere," Beranek writes. Riding The Waves is a testament to the boldness, diligence, and intelligence behind Beranek's lifetime of extraordinary achievement. Leo Beranek is a pioneer in acoustical research, known for his work in noise control and the acoustics of concert halls, and the author of twelve books on these topics. The many awards he has received include the Presidential National Medal of Science, presented in 2003.

  • Degrees, Awards, and Honors

    Leo Beranek, an Iowa farm boy who became a Renaissance man--scientist, inventor, entrepreneur, musician, television executive, philanthropist, and author--has lived life in constant motion. His seventy-year career, through the most tumultuous and transformative years of the last century, has always been propelled by the sheer exhilaration of trying something new. In Riding The Waves, Leo Beranek tells his story. Beranek's life changed direction on a summer day in 1935 when he stopped to help a motorist with a flat tire. The driver just happened to be a former Harvard professor of engineering, who guided the young Beranek toward a full scholarship at Harvard's graduate school of engineering. Beranek went on to be one of the world's leading experts on acoustics. He became Director of Harvard's Electro-Acoustic Laboratory, where he invented the Hush-A-Phone--a telephone accessory that began the chain of regulatory challenges and lawsuits that led ultimately to the breakup of the Bell Telephone monopoly in the 1980s. Beranek moved to MIT to be a professor and Technical Director of its Acoustics Laboratory, then left academia to found the acoustical consulting firm Bolt, Beranek and Newman. Known for his work in noise control and concert acoustics, Beranek devised the world's largest muffler to quiet jet noise and served as acoustical consultant for concert halls around the world (including the Tanglewood Music Shed, the storied summer home of the Boston Symphony Orchestra). As president of BBN, he assembled the software group that invented both the ARPANET, the forerunner of the Internet, and e-mail. In the 1970s, Beranek risked his life savings to secure the license to operate a television station; he turned Channel 5 in Boston into one of the country&# 39;s best, then sold it to Metromedia in 1982 for the highest price ever paid up to that time for a broadcast station. "One central lesson I've learned is the value of risk-taking and of moving on when risks turn into busts or odds look better elsewhere," Beranek writes. Riding The Waves is a testament to the boldness, diligence, and intelligence behind Beranek's lifetime of extraordinary achievement. Leo Beranek is a pioneer in acoustical research, known for his work in noise control and the acoustics of concert halls, and the author of twelve books on these topics. The many awards he has received include the Presidential National Medal of Science, presented in 2003.

  • No title

    Spectral estimation is important in many fields including astronomy, meteorology, seismology, communications, economics, speech analysis, medical imaging, radar, sonar, and underwater acoustics. Most existing spectral estimation algorithms are devised for uniformly sampled complete-data sequences. However, the spectral estimation for data sequences with missing samples is also important in many applications ranging from astronomical time series analysis to synthetic aperture radar imaging with angular diversity. For spectral estimation in the missing-data case, the challenge is how to extend the existing spectral estimation techniques to deal with these missing- data samples. Recently, nonparametric adaptive filtering based techniques have been developed successfully for various missing-data problems. Collectively, these algorithms provide a comprehensive toolset for the missing-data problem based exclusively on the nonparametric adaptive filter-bank approaches, which are robust and ac urate, and can provide high resolution and low sidelobes. In this book, we present these algorithms for both one-dimensional and two- dimensional spectral estimation problems.

  • The Electrification of Sound: From High Culture to Electropolis

    The works of Hermann Helmholtz and John William Strutt, 3rd Baron Rayleigh, were the benchmark of acoustics research in the nineteenth century. Helmholtz and Rayleigh were masters of both mathematical analysis and experimental investigation.

  • TLM in Vibration and Acoustics

    This chapter contains sections titled: Torsional Waves Sound Waves This chapter contains sections titled: References

  • Acoustic Lenses and Mirrors

    This chapter contains sections titled: Optics Optics and Acoustics An Ellipsoidal Lens Spherical Lenses Zone Lenses Acoustic Mirrors (Focusing Reflectors) References

  • Notes

    Electrical engineering is a protean profession. Today the field embraces many disciplines that seem far removed from its roots in the telegraph, telephone, electric lamps, motors, and generators. To a remarkable extent, this chronicle of change and growth at a single institution is a capsule history of the discipline and profession of electrical engineering as it developed worldwide. Even when MIT was not leading the way, the department was usually quick to adapt to changing needs, goals, curricula, and research programs. What has remained constant throughout is the dynamic interaction of teaching and research, flexibility of administration, the interconnections with industrial progress and national priorities.The book's text and many photographs introduce readers to the renowned teachers and researchers who are still well known in engineering circles, among them: Vannevar Bush, Harold Hazen, Edward Bowles, Gordon Brown, Harold Edgerton, Ernst Guillemin, Arthur von Hippel, and Jay Forrester.The book covers the department's major areas of activity - electrical power systems, servomechanisms, circuit theory, communications theory, radar and microwaves (developed first at the famed Radiation Laboratory during World War II), insulation and dielectrics, electronics, acoustics, and computation. This rich history of accomplishments shows moreover that years before "Computer Science" was added to the department's name such pioneering results in computation and control as Vannevar Bush's Differential Analyzer, early cybernetic devices and numerically controlled servomechanisms, the Whirlwind computer, and the evolution of time-sharing computation had already been achieved.Karl Wildes has been associated with the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer S cience since the 1920s, and is now Professor Emeritus. Nilo Lindgren, an electrical engineering graduate of MIT and professional scientific and technical journalist for many years, is at present affiliated with the Electric Power Res¿¿arch Institute in Palo Alto, California.

  • Name Index

    At the end of the nineteenth century, acoustics was a science of musical sounds; the musically trained ear was the ultimate reference. Just a few decades into the twentieth century, acoustics had undergone a transformation from a scientific field based on the understanding of classical music to one guided by electrical engineering, with industrial and military applications. In this book, Roland Wittje traces this transition, from the late nineteenth- century work of Hermann Helmholtz to the militarized research of World War I and media technology in the 1930s. Wittje shows that physics in the early twentieth century was not only about relativity and atomic structure but encompassed a range of experimental, applied, and industrial research fields. The emergence of technical acoustics and electroacoustics illustrates a scientific field at the intersection of science and technology. Wittje starts with Helmholtz's and Rayleigh's work and its intersection with telegraphy and ear y wireless, and continues with the industrialization of acoustics during World War I, when sound measurement was automated and electrical engineering and radio took over the concept of noise. Researchers no longer appealed to the musically trained ear to understand sound but to the thinking and practices of electrical engineering. Finally, Wittje covers the demilitarization of acoustics during the Weimar Republic and its remilitarization at the beginning of the Third Reich. He shows how technical acoustics fit well with the Nazi dismissal of pure science, representing everything that "German Physics" under National Socialism should be: experimental, applied, and relevant to the military.

  • Theoretical Preliminaries of Acoustics

    This chapter gives a brief review of the acoustics necessary for acoustic array signal processing. In particular, two approaches of representing the sound field are described. Remarks are made on the ill-posedness associated with inverse problems.



Standards related to Acoustics

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American National Standard Letter Symbols and Abbreviations for Quantities Used in Acoustics

To establish a standard set of letter symbols for quantities used in the science and technology of acoustics: also to establish standard abbreviations for a number of acoustical levels and related measures that are in common use. The science and technology of acoustics include sound, ultrasound, and infrasound in all media: gases, especially air; liquids, especially water; and solids are ...


IEEE Standard for the Application of Free Field Acoustic Reference to Telephony Measurements

This standard provides the techniques and rationale for referencing acoustic telephony measurements to the free field. It applies to ear related measurements such as receive, sidetone and overall.


IEEE Standard Method for Determining Objective Loudness Ratings of Telephone Connections

The procedures given in this standard may be used for determining the loudness rating of partial and complete telephone connections. For complete telephone connections, comprising overall and sidetone transmission paths, the procedures involve measurement of acoustic input and output pressures. For partial telephone connectiond comprising transmitting, receiving, or connection paths, the procedures involve measurement of acoustics pressures and electric voltages.


IEEE Standard Method for Measuring Transmission Performance of Handsfree Telephone Sets

Techniques for objective measurement of electroacoustic and voice switching characteristics of analog and digital handsfree telephone sets.



Jobs related to Acoustics

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