IEEE Organizations related to CD recording

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Conferences related to CD recording

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2012 IEEE International Symposium on Multimedia (ISM)

Multimedia systems, architecture, and applications, Multimedia networking and QoS, Peer-to-peer multimedia systems and streaming, Pervasive and interactive multimedia systems including mobile systems, pervasive gaming, and digital TV, Multimedia meta-modeling techniques and operating systems, Architecture specification languages, Software development using multimedia techniques, Multimedia signal processing including audio, video, image processing and coding, Multimedia Information Visualization and Interactive Systems, Virtual Reality, Multimedia file systems, databases, and retrieval, Multimedia collaboration, Multimedia in social network analysis, Rich media enabled E-commerce, Computational intelligence including neural networks, fuzzy logic, and genetic algorithms, Intelligent agents for multimedia content creation, distribution and analysis, Internet telephony and hypermedia technologies and systems, Multimedia security including digital watermark and encryption.

  • 2011 IEEE International Symposium on Multimedia (ISM)

    The IEEE International Symposium on Multimedia (ISM2011) is an international forum for researchers to exchange information regarding advances in the state of the art and practice of multimedia computing, as well as to identify the emerging research topics and define the future of multimedia computing. The technical program of ISM2011 will consist of invited talks, paper presentations, and panel discussions. Submissions are solicited for full papers, workshop papers, technical demos, and panels.

  • 2010 IEEE International Symposium on Multimedia (ISM)

    The IEEE International Symposium on Multimedia (ISM2010) is an international forum for researchers to exchange information regarding advances in the state-of-the-art and practice of multimedia computing, as well as to identify the emerging research topics and define the future of multimedia computing. The technical program of ISM2010 will consist of invited talks, paper presentations, and panel discussions.

  • 2009 IEEE International Symposium on Multimedia (ISM)

    The IEEE International Symposium on Multimedia (ISM2009) is an international forum for researchers to exchange information regarding advances in the state of the art and practice of multimedia computing, as well as to identify the emerging research topics and define the future of multimedia computing. The technical program of ISM2009 will consist of invited talks, paper presentations, and panel discussions.

  • 2008 IEEE International Symposium on Multimedia (ISM) (Formerly MSE)

    The IEEE International Symposium on Multimedia (ISM2008) is an international forum for researchers to exchange information regarding advances in the state of the art and practice of multimedia computing, as well as to identify the emerging research topics and define the future of multimedia computing.

  • 2007 IEEE International Symposium on Multimedia (ISM) (Formerly MSE)

  • 2006 IEEE International Symposium on Multimedia (ISM) (Formerly MSE)


2011 IEEE Asia-Pacific Services Computing Conference (APSCC)

The services computing is a new cross-discipline that covers the science and technology needed to bridge the gap between business services and IT/telecommunication services.

  • 2010 Asia-Pacific Services Computing Conference (APSCC)

    IT/telecommunication-driven business services and application services, as well as to identify emerging research topics and define the future irections of Services Computing.

  • 2009 IEEE Asia-Pacific Services Computing Conference (APSCC)

    IEEE APSCC 2009 is an important forum for researchers and industry practitioners to exchange information regarding advancements in the state of art and practice of IT/telecommunication-driven business services and application services, as well as to identify emerging research topics and define the future directions of Services Computing

  • 2008 IEEE Asia-Pacific Services Computing Conference (APSCC)

    Services Computing is a new cross-discipline that covers the science and technology needed to bridge the gap between business services and IT services. The goal of services computing is to develop new computing technology and thereby enable more advanced IT services to support business services more efficiently and effectively. IEEE APSCC 2008 is an important forum for researchers and industry practitioners to exchange information regarding advancements in the state of art and practice



Periodicals related to CD recording

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Magnetics, IEEE Transactions on

Science and technology related to the basic physics and engineering of magnetism, magnetic materials, applied magnetics, magnetic devices, and magnetic data storage. The Transactions publishes scholarly articles of archival value as well as tutorial expositions and critical reviews of classical subjects and topics of current interest.


Proceedings of the IEEE

The most highly-cited general interest journal in electrical engineering and computer science, the Proceedings is the best way to stay informed on an exemplary range of topics. This journal also holds the distinction of having the longest useful archival life of any EE or computer related journal in the world! Since 1913, the Proceedings of the IEEE has been the ...


Selected Areas in Communications, IEEE Journal on

All telecommunications, including telephone, telegraphy, facsimile, and point-to-point television, by electromagnetic propagation, including radio; wire; aerial, underground, coaxial, and submarine cables; waveguides, communication satellites, and lasers; in marine, aeronautical, space, and fixed station services; repeaters, radio relaying, signal storage, and regeneration; telecommunication error detection and correction; multiplexing and carrier techniques; communication switching systems; data communications; communication theory; and wireless communications.




Xplore Articles related to CD recording

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Technology and the dream: reflections on the black experience at MIT, 1941-1999 - Book review

C. Thompson IEEE Technology and Society Magazine, 2005

None


Constrained codes and systems

R. M. Roth Information Theory and Networking Workshop, 1999, 1999

In digital optical and magnetic recording systems the data is written along tracks. Namely, we visualize the recording device as containing one long strip of data. To ensure reliable recording and readback, the raw data typically undergoes a constrained coding stage that matches the recorded data with constraints that are dictated by physical characteristics of the recording device. The author ...


A predominant-F<sub>0</sub> estimation method for CD recordings: MAP estimation using EM algorithm for adaptive tone models

M. Goto Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing, 2001. Proceedings. (ICASSP '01). 2001 IEEE International Conference on, 2001

This paper describes a predominant-F0 (fundamental frequency) estimation method called PreFEst, which can detect melody and bass lines in monaural audio signals containing sounds of various instruments, While most previous methods premised mixtures of a few sounds and had difficulty dealing with such complex signals, our method can estimate the F0 of the melody and bass lines without assuming the ...


Diode laser optical recording using trilayer structures

R. Bartolini; A. Bell; F. Spong IEEE Journal of Quantum Electronics, 1981

A new high-power diode laser and a more sensitive trilayer disk structure useful for FM video and digital data recording have been demonstrated. The diode laser is a constricted double-heterojunction large optical cavity (CDH- LOC) device capable of up to 100 mW output power in a single stable mode. By improving the thermal efficiency of the trilayer structure, the sensitivity ...


Influence of MLS signal recording on various mediums

D. G. Ciric; M. A. Milosevic Telecommunications in Modern Satellite, Cable and Broadcasting Service, 2003. TELSIKS 2003. 6th International Conference on, 2003

Maximum length sequence (MLS) technique represents widely used technique for measurement of impulse responses. Since the impulse response is extracted by cross-correlation between the excitation signal and measured response, the distortions of these signals can significantly influence the measurement results. Possible distortions of the excitation signal can be obtained by its recording on various mediums and by its reproduction from ...


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Educational Resources on CD recording

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eLearning

Technology and the dream: reflections on the black experience at MIT, 1941-1999 - Book review

C. Thompson IEEE Technology and Society Magazine, 2005

None


Constrained codes and systems

R. M. Roth Information Theory and Networking Workshop, 1999, 1999

In digital optical and magnetic recording systems the data is written along tracks. Namely, we visualize the recording device as containing one long strip of data. To ensure reliable recording and readback, the raw data typically undergoes a constrained coding stage that matches the recorded data with constraints that are dictated by physical characteristics of the recording device. The author ...


A predominant-F<sub>0</sub> estimation method for CD recordings: MAP estimation using EM algorithm for adaptive tone models

M. Goto Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing, 2001. Proceedings. (ICASSP '01). 2001 IEEE International Conference on, 2001

This paper describes a predominant-F0 (fundamental frequency) estimation method called PreFEst, which can detect melody and bass lines in monaural audio signals containing sounds of various instruments, While most previous methods premised mixtures of a few sounds and had difficulty dealing with such complex signals, our method can estimate the F0 of the melody and bass lines without assuming the ...


Diode laser optical recording using trilayer structures

R. Bartolini; A. Bell; F. Spong IEEE Journal of Quantum Electronics, 1981

A new high-power diode laser and a more sensitive trilayer disk structure useful for FM video and digital data recording have been demonstrated. The diode laser is a constricted double-heterojunction large optical cavity (CDH- LOC) device capable of up to 100 mW output power in a single stable mode. By improving the thermal efficiency of the trilayer structure, the sensitivity ...


Influence of MLS signal recording on various mediums

D. G. Ciric; M. A. Milosevic Telecommunications in Modern Satellite, Cable and Broadcasting Service, 2003. TELSIKS 2003. 6th International Conference on, 2003

Maximum length sequence (MLS) technique represents widely used technique for measurement of impulse responses. Since the impulse response is extracted by cross-correlation between the excitation signal and measured response, the distortions of these signals can significantly influence the measurement results. Possible distortions of the excitation signal can be obtained by its recording on various mediums and by its reproduction from ...


More eLearning Resources

IEEE.tv Videos

No IEEE.tv Videos are currently tagged "CD recording"

IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Case Studies

    Economists use the term "bandwagon effect" to describe the benefit a consumer enjoys as a result of others' using the same product or service. The history of videocassettes offers a striking example of the power of bandwagon effects. Originally there were two technical standards for videocassettes in the United States: Beta and VHS. Beta was widely regarded to have better picture quality, but VHS could record longer television programs. Eventually the selection of Beta cassettes shrank to zero, leaving consumers no choice but to get on the VHS bandwagon. The most successful bandwagon, apart from telephone service, is the Internet.In this book Jeffrey Rohlfs shows how the dynamics of bandwagons differ from those of conventional products and services. They are difficult to get started and often fail before getting under way. A classic example of a marketing failure is the Picturephone, introduced by the Bell System in the early 1970s. Rohlfs describes the fierce battles waged by competitors when new services are introduced, as well as cases of early agreement on a single technical standard, as with CDs and CD players. He also discusses the debate among economists and policy analysts over the advantages and disadvantages of having governments set technical standards. The case studies include fax machines, telephones, CD players, VCRs, personal computers, television, and the Internet.

  • Future Technologies for Medical Applications

    The modern age of surgery began at the end of the nineteenth century because medicine discovered the Industrial Age, with its wealth of revolutionary technologies such as anesthesia, asepsis, microscopy, and new materials. At the close of the twentieth century, the Information Age diffused into medicine, and a revolution of even greater magnitude occurred. To understand the change it is necessary to look outside of medicine to society as a whole and find the underlying principles, and then apply them within our discipline. The medical record is now becoming electronic and nearly all of our imaging has changed from film (atoms) to digital images (bits). Medical education is using computer-aided instructions, CD-ROM, and VR to simulate and supplement cadaver and animal models. With the new research in robotics, even our hand motions are being changed in to electronic signals and being sent from one place to another. The future of medicine is no longer blood and guts, but bits and bytes. A commonality of information enables us to tie together a whole new concept of how medicine could evolve, like an entire medical ecosystem, whereby discoveries in micro-sensors permits new imaging devices, which in turn enable new forms of image-based surgery. It is an upward spiral, one discovery providing a giant step forward toward the next technology and escalating the whole changing system logarithmically. This could help explain why we are all so overwhelmed by the rapidity of our changing profession. Yet the younger generation of physicians-to-be are not so uncomfortable with the rapidly changing technologies. One of their fundamental tools is the ability to understand the world in the form of three-dimensional (3-D) visualization. There is a speculative scenario that can be used as a framework to illuminate the integrating power of this concept. It is referred to as the doorway t o the future and extrapolates to 20, 50 or perhaps 100 years into the future. As a patient visits her surgeon for a consult, she passes through the office door and, just as scanning is performed today by airport security, she has multiple imaging modalities scanning her (perhaps CT, MRI, ultrasound, and infrared). The data are all collected and then displayed as a 3-D image of her (looking like the Visible Human) but with not only correct anatomic structure but also all the biochemical and other data added to the correct organ systems. If an abnormality is seen, such as a colon mass, a virtual colonoscopy can be done on the image by flying through the colon with the same view as an actual colonoscopy. If a lesion is found, the image can be used for patient education, illustrating to the patient exactly what her specific problem is. At the time of surgery, an image can be imported onto the video monitor of laparoscopic colon resection, and with data fusion the two images displayed simultaneously as an intraoperative navigation tool (stereotactic navigation). At the postoperative follow up visit, the patient is scanned again, by comparing the postoperative with the preoperative datasets and using digital subtraction techniques, the difference between the two datasets is automatic outcomes analysis. Because the record is a dataset, it can be stored on a credit card (the U.S. military is using a prototype card called the MARC card) or kept on a Web server to be distributed worldwide over the Internet for consultation. The purpose of the this scenario is to provide an explanation of and rationale for why it is so important to understand how information can empower us, to show the looking glass through which the next-generation surgeon will be viewing the world. To bring the scenario out of the speculative and rhetorical and into the real world, the technologies that these views are presented in this chapter must be held accountable to the scrutiny of science. Only when these new discoveries are properly evaluated with rigorous testing and clinical trials can ...

  • Glossary of Economics Concepts

    Economists use the term "bandwagon effect" to describe the benefit a consumer enjoys as a result of others' using the same product or service. The history of videocassettes offers a striking example of the power of bandwagon effects. Originally there were two technical standards for videocassettes in the United States: Beta and VHS. Beta was widely regarded to have better picture quality, but VHS could record longer television programs. Eventually the selection of Beta cassettes shrank to zero, leaving consumers no choice but to get on the VHS bandwagon. The most successful bandwagon, apart from telephone service, is the Internet.In this book Jeffrey Rohlfs shows how the dynamics of bandwagons differ from those of conventional products and services. They are difficult to get started and often fail before getting under way. A classic example of a marketing failure is the Picturephone, introduced by the Bell System in the early 1970s. Rohlfs describes the fierce battles waged by competitors when new services are introduced, as well as cases of early agreement on a single technical standard, as with CDs and CD players. He also discusses the debate among economists and policy analysts over the advantages and disadvantages of having governments set technical standards. The case studies include fax machines, telephones, CD players, VCRs, personal computers, television, and the Internet.

  • Conclusions

    Economists use the term "bandwagon effect" to describe the benefit a consumer enjoys as a result of others' using the same product or service. The history of videocassettes offers a striking example of the power of bandwagon effects. Originally there were two technical standards for videocassettes in the United States: Beta and VHS. Beta was widely regarded to have better picture quality, but VHS could record longer television programs. Eventually the selection of Beta cassettes shrank to zero, leaving consumers no choice but to get on the VHS bandwagon. The most successful bandwagon, apart from telephone service, is the Internet.In this book Jeffrey Rohlfs shows how the dynamics of bandwagons differ from those of conventional products and services. They are difficult to get started and often fail before getting under way. A classic example of a marketing failure is the Picturephone, introduced by the Bell System in the early 1970s. Rohlfs describes the fierce battles waged by competitors when new services are introduced, as well as cases of early agreement on a single technical standard, as with CDs and CD players. He also discusses the debate among economists and policy analysts over the advantages and disadvantages of having governments set technical standards. The case studies include fax machines, telephones, CD players, VCRs, personal computers, television, and the Internet.

  • DVD

    This chapter contains sections titled: CD-Rewritable Technology DVD Technology [8] Future Trends References

  • Index

    Economists use the term "bandwagon effect" to describe the benefit a consumer enjoys as a result of others' using the same product or service. The history of videocassettes offers a striking example of the power of bandwagon effects. Originally there were two technical standards for videocassettes in the United States: Beta and VHS. Beta was widely regarded to have better picture quality, but VHS could record longer television programs. Eventually the selection of Beta cassettes shrank to zero, leaving consumers no choice but to get on the VHS bandwagon. The most successful bandwagon, apart from telephone service, is the Internet.In this book Jeffrey Rohlfs shows how the dynamics of bandwagons differ from those of conventional products and services. They are difficult to get started and often fail before getting under way. A classic example of a marketing failure is the Picturephone, introduced by the Bell System in the early 1970s. Rohlfs describes the fierce battles waged by competitors when new services are introduced, as well as cases of early agreement on a single technical standard, as with CDs and CD players. He also discusses the debate among economists and policy analysts over the advantages and disadvantages of having governments set technical standards. The case studies include fax machines, telephones, CD players, VCRs, personal computers, television, and the Internet.

  • Bandwagons: How They Work

    Economists use the term "bandwagon effect" to describe the benefit a consumer enjoys as a result of others' using the same product or service. The history of videocassettes offers a striking example of the power of bandwagon effects. Originally there were two technical standards for videocassettes in the United States: Beta and VHS. Beta was widely regarded to have better picture quality, but VHS could record longer television programs. Eventually the selection of Beta cassettes shrank to zero, leaving consumers no choice but to get on the VHS bandwagon. The most successful bandwagon, apart from telephone service, is the Internet.In this book Jeffrey Rohlfs shows how the dynamics of bandwagons differ from those of conventional products and services. They are difficult to get started and often fail before getting under way. A classic example of a marketing failure is the Picturephone, introduced by the Bell System in the early 1970s. Rohlfs describes the fierce battles waged by competitors when new services are introduced, as well as cases of early agreement on a single technical standard, as with CDs and CD players. He also discusses the debate among economists and policy analysts over the advantages and disadvantages of having governments set technical standards. The case studies include fax machines, telephones, CD players, VCRs, personal computers, television, and the Internet.

  • Final Remarks

    Economists use the term "bandwagon effect" to describe the benefit a consumer enjoys as a result of others' using the same product or service. The history of videocassettes offers a striking example of the power of bandwagon effects. Originally there were two technical standards for videocassettes in the United States: Beta and VHS. Beta was widely regarded to have better picture quality, but VHS could record longer television programs. Eventually the selection of Beta cassettes shrank to zero, leaving consumers no choice but to get on the VHS bandwagon. The most successful bandwagon, apart from telephone service, is the Internet.In this book Jeffrey Rohlfs shows how the dynamics of bandwagons differ from those of conventional products and services. They are difficult to get started and often fail before getting under way. A classic example of a marketing failure is the Picturephone, introduced by the Bell System in the early 1970s. Rohlfs describes the fierce battles waged by competitors when new services are introduced, as well as cases of early agreement on a single technical standard, as with CDs and CD players. He also discusses the debate among economists and policy analysts over the advantages and disadvantages of having governments set technical standards. The case studies include fax machines, telephones, CD players, VCRs, personal computers, television, and the Internet.

  • Computer Components

    This chapter contains sections titled: Manual Inputs Magnetic Records Magazines CD-ROMs Optical Character Recognition (OCR) Printers and Plotters Acoustic Devices Simulators and Trainers Displays Heat Removal

  • Bibliography

    Economists use the term "bandwagon effect" to describe the benefit a consumer enjoys as a result of others' using the same product or service. The history of videocassettes offers a striking example of the power of bandwagon effects. Originally there were two technical standards for videocassettes in the United States: Beta and VHS. Beta was widely regarded to have better picture quality, but VHS could record longer television programs. Eventually the selection of Beta cassettes shrank to zero, leaving consumers no choice but to get on the VHS bandwagon. The most successful bandwagon, apart from telephone service, is the Internet.In this book Jeffrey Rohlfs shows how the dynamics of bandwagons differ from those of conventional products and services. They are difficult to get started and often fail before getting under way. A classic example of a marketing failure is the Picturephone, introduced by the Bell System in the early 1970s. Rohlfs describes the fierce battles waged by competitors when new services are introduced, as well as cases of early agreement on a single technical standard, as with CDs and CD players. He also discusses the debate among economists and policy analysts over the advantages and disadvantages of having governments set technical standards. The case studies include fax machines, telephones, CD players, VCRs, personal computers, television, and the Internet.



Standards related to CD recording

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No standards are currently tagged "CD recording"


Jobs related to CD recording

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