Cadaver

View this topic in
A corpse, also called a cadaver in medical, literary, and legal usage or when intended for dissection, is a dead human body. (Wikipedia.org)






Conferences related to Cadaver

Back to Top

2019 9th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering (NER)

Neural Engineering

  • 2017 8th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering (NER)

    Neural Engineering is an emerging core discipline,which coalesces neuroscience with engineering.Members of both the Neuroscience and Engineering Communities areencouraged to attend this highly multidisciplinarymeeting. The conference will highlight the emergingengineering innovations in the restoration andenhancement of impaired sensory, motor, andcognitive functions, novel engineering for deepeningknowledge of brain function, and advanced designand use of neurotechnologies

  • 2015 7th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering (NER)

    Neural engineering deals with many aspects of basic and clinical problemsassociated with neural dysfunction including the representation of sensory and motor information, theelectrical stimulation of the neuromuscular system to control the muscle activation and movement, theanalysis and visualization of complex neural systems at multi -scale from the single -cell and to the systemlevels to understand the underlying mechanisms, the development of novel neural prostheses, implantsand wearable devices to restore and enhance the impaired sensory and motor systems and functions.

  • 2013 6th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering (NER)

    Neural engineering deals with many aspects of basic and clinical problems associated with neural dysfunction including the representation of sensory and motor information, the electrical stimulation of the neuromuscular system to control the muscle activation and movement, the analysis and visualization of complex neural systems at multi-scale from the single-cell and to the system levels to understand the underlying mechanisms, the development of novel neural prostheses, implants and wearable devices to restore and enhance the impaired sensory and motor systems and functions.

  • 2011 5th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering (NER)

    highlight the emerging field, Neural Engineering that unites engineering, physics, chemistry, mathematics, computer science with molecular, cellular, cognitive and behavioral neuroscience and encompasses such areas as replacing or restoring lost sensory and motor abilities, defining the organizing principles and underlying mechanisms of neural systems, neurorobotics, neuroelectronics, brain imaging and mapping, cognitive science and neuroscience.

  • 2009 4th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering (NER)

    highlight the emerging field, Neural Engineering that unites engineering, physics, chemistry, mathematics, computer science with molecular, cellular, cognitive and behavioral neuroscience and encompasses such areas as replacing or restoring lost sensory and motor abilities, defining the organizing principles and underlying mechanisms of neural systems, neurorobotics, neuroelectronics, brain imaging and mapping, cognitive science and neuroscience.

  • 2007 3rd International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering

  • 2005 2nd International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering

  • 2003 1st International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering


2018 14th IEEE International Conference on Signal Processing (ICSP)

ICSP2018 includes sessions on all aspects of theory, design and applications of signal processing. Prospective authors are invited to propose papers in any of the following areas, but not limited to: A. Digital Signal Processing (DSP)B. Spectrum Estimation & ModelingC. TF Spectrum Analysis & WaveletD. Higher Order Spectral AnalysisE. Adaptive Filtering &SPF. Array Signal ProcessingG. Hardware Implementation for Signal ProcessingH Speech and Audio CodingI. Speech Synthesis & RecognitionJ. Image Processing & UnderstandingK. PDE for Image ProcessingL.Video compression &StreamingM. Computer Vision & VRN. Multimedia & Human-computer InteractionO. Statistic Learning & Pattern RecognitionP. AI & Neural NetworksQ. Communication Signal processingR. SP for Internet and Wireless CommunicationsS. Biometrics & AuthentificationT. SP for Bio-medical & Cognitive ScienceU


2018 25th IEEE International Conference on Image Processing (ICIP)

The International Conference on Image Processing (ICIP), sponsored by the IEEE Signal Processing Society, is the premier forum for the presentation of technological advances and research results in the fields of theoretical, experimental, and applied image and video processing. ICIP 2018, the 25th in the series that has been held annually since 1994, brings together leading engineers and scientists in image and video processing from around the world.


2018 40th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC)

The conference program will consist of plenary lectures, symposia, workshops and invitedsessions of the latest significant findings and developments in all the major fields of biomedical engineering.Submitted papers will be peer reviewed. Accepted high quality papers will be presented in oral and postersessions, will appear in the Conference Proceedings and will be indexed in PubMed/MEDLINE


2018 7th IEEE International Conference on Biomedical Robotics and Biomechatronics (Biorob)

The RAS/EMBS International Conference on Biomedical Robotics and Biomechatronics - BioRob 2018 - is a joint effort of the two IEEE Societies of Robotics and Automation - RAS - and Engineering in Medicine and Biology - EMBS.BioRob covers both theoretical and experimental challenges posed by the application of robotics and mechatronics in medicine and biology. The primary focus of Biorobotics is to analyze biological systems from a "biomechatronic" point of view, trying to understand the scientific and engineering principles underlying their extraordinary performance. This profound understanding of how biological systems work, behave and interact can be used for two main objectives: to guide the design and fabrication of novel, high performance bio-inspired machines and systems for many different applications; and to develop novel nano, micro-, macro- devices that can act upon, substitute parts of, and assist human beings in prevention, diagnosis, surgery, prosthetics, rehabilitation.


More Conferences

Periodicals related to Cadaver

Back to Top

Biomedical Circuits and Systems, IEEE Transactions on

The Transactions on Biomedical Circuits and Systems addresses areas at the crossroads of Circuits and Systems and Life Sciences. The main emphasis is on microelectronic issues in a wide range of applications found in life sciences, physical sciences and engineering. The primary goal of the journal is to bridge the unique scientific and technical activities of the Circuits and Systems ...


Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Broad coverage of concepts and methods of the physical and engineering sciences applied in biology and medicine, ranging from formalized mathematical theory through experimental science and technological development to practical clinical applications.


Computer

Computer, the flagship publication of the IEEE Computer Society, publishes peer-reviewed technical content that covers all aspects of computer science, computer engineering, technology, and applications. Computer is a resource that practitioners, researchers, and managers can rely on to provide timely information about current research developments, trends, best practices, and changes in the profession.


Computer Graphics and Applications, IEEE

IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications (CG&A) bridges the theory and practice of computer graphics. From specific algorithms to full system implementations, CG&A offers a strong combination of peer-reviewed feature articles and refereed departments, including news and product announcements. Special Applications sidebars relate research stories to commercial development. Cover stories focus on creative applications of the technology by an artist or ...


Computing in Science & Engineering

Physics, medicine, astronomy—these and other hard sciences share a common need for efficient algorithms, system software, and computer architecture to address large computational problems. And yet, useful advances in computational techniques that could benefit many researchers are rarely shared. To meet that need, Computing in Science & Engineering (CiSE) presents scientific and computational contributions in a clear and accessible format. ...


More Periodicals


Xplore Articles related to Cadaver

Back to Top

Control of Joint Motion Simulators for Biomechanical Research

[{u'author_order': 1, u'affiliation': u'Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003', u'full_name': u'R. Colbaugh'}, {u'author_order': 2, u'affiliation': u'Dept. of Industrial Engineering, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003', u'full_name': u'K. Glass'}] 1992 American Control Conference, None

This paper presents a hierarchical adaptive algorithm for controlling upper extremity human joint motion simulators. A joint motion simulator is a computer-controlled, electromechanical system which permits the application of forces to the tendons of a human cadaver specimen in such a way that the cadaver joint under study achieves a desired motion in a physiologic manner. The proposed control scheme ...


Quantitative computer assisted tomography (QCT) and mechanical properties of cancellous bone

[{u'author_order': 1, u'affiliation': u'Dept. of Orthopaedic Surg., Louisiana State Univ. Med. Coll., Shreveport, LA, USA', u'full_name': u'J. J. Lorio'}, {u'author_order': 2, u'affiliation': u'Dept. of Orthopaedic Surg., Louisiana State Univ. Med. Coll., Shreveport, LA, USA', u'full_name': u'R. N. Kruse'}, {u'author_order': 3, u'affiliation': u'Dept. of Orthopaedic Surg., Louisiana State Univ. Med. Coll., Shreveport, LA, USA', u'full_name': u'D. P. Mukherjee'}, {u'author_order': 4, u'affiliation': u'Dept. of Orthopaedic Surg., Louisiana State Univ. Med. Coll., Shreveport, LA, USA', u'full_name': u'J. A. Albright'}] [1993] Proceedings of the Twelfth Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference, None

The density of cylindrical cancellous bone samples was obtained by quantitative computer assisted tomography (QCT). Their compressive strength was measured. Two groups of purified bone graft cylinders (Pelican Tissue Bank) were tested. In one, the major trabecular orientation was vertical, while the other had random orientation. In addition, cancellous bone plugs were harvested from the femoral head, trochanter and condyles ...


FDTD predictions of electromagnetic fields in and near human bodies using Visible Human Project anatomical scans

[{u'author_order': 1, u'affiliation': u'Dept. of Electr. Eng., Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA, USA', u'full_name': u'R. Luebbers'}, {u'author_order': 2, u'full_name': u'R. Baurle'}] IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society International Symposium. 1996 Digest, None

A challenging problem in computational electromagnetics is the prediction of the electromagnetic fields induced in a human body by radiation from nearby antennas. Interest in possible biological effects of portable telephones has spurred recent work on this problem. Currently the most popular approach for making these calculations is the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. In order to provide more ...


Heating of the Eye by a Retinal Prosthesis: Modeling, Cadaver and In Vivo Study

[{u'author_order': 1, u'affiliation': u'NeuroEngineering Laboratory, Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia', u'full_name': u'Nicholas L. Opie'}, {u'author_order': 2, u'affiliation': u'NeuroEngineering Laboratory, Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia', u'full_name': u'Anthony N. Burkitt'}, {u'author_order': 3, u'affiliation': u'NeuroEngineering Laboratory, Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia', u'full_name': u'Hamish Meffin'}, {u'author_order': 4, u'affiliation': u'NeuroEngineering Laboratory, Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia', u'full_name': u'David B. Grayden'}] IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering, 2012

In order to develop retinal implants with a large number of electrodes, it is necessary to ensure that they do not cause damage to the neural tissue by the heat that the electrical circuits generate. Knowledge of the amount of power that induces thermal damage will assist in development of power budgets for implants, which has a significant effect upon ...


Measurement of carpal bone geometry in CT images

[{u'author_order': 1, u'affiliation': u'Texas Univ. Med. Branch, Galveston, TX, USA', u'full_name': u'G. R. Hillman'}, {u'author_order': 2, u'affiliation': u'Texas Univ. Med. Branch, Galveston, TX, USA', u'full_name': u'S. F. Viegas'}, {u'author_order': 3, u'affiliation': u'Texas Univ. Med. Branch, Galveston, TX, USA', u'full_name': u'H. R. Tagare'}, {u'author_order': 4, u'affiliation': u'Texas Univ. Med. Branch, Galveston, TX, USA', u'full_name': u'K. W. Elder'}] Conference Record of the 1991 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference, None

Contiguous CT (computed tomography) slice images of the carpal region of human cadaver extremities were acquired. The boundaries of the individual carpal bones were located in the images, using a boundary tracker that uses intensity, gradient, angular, and neighborhood information to evaluate alternative boundary locations. A dynamic programming technique is used to find an optimal path through a region of ...


More Xplore Articles

Educational Resources on Cadaver

Back to Top

eLearning

No eLearning Articles are currently tagged "Cadaver"

IEEE.tv Videos

No IEEE.tv Videos are currently tagged "Cadaver"

IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Practitioner, Heal Thyself

    This chapter suggests that a software industry could be improved by utilizing a medical school model in universities. Like most current curricula, individual courses would cover requirements, design, implementation, testing, quality assurance and configuration management, project management, formal methods, maintenance, metrics, and so on. After all, people should strive to teach how to do things, not just how to talk about things. Like medical students, each software student should also be assigned a cadaver: a large software system that either works now or worked at one time. During every regular class, students would simultaneously enroll in the cadaver lab, where they would perform related tasks on their assigned software. As in medicine, the students must complete a minimum one-year internship. Internships could take place in special for-profit or not-for-profit companies closely affiliated with or established by the school of software.

  • Virtual Reality and MedicineChallenges for the TwentyFirst Century

    Robert Mann first proposed a virtual reality (VR) system for medical applications in 1965. His initial ideas were for a rehabilitation application for virtual reality. Later, his vision was to develop a system that would allow surgeons to test out multiple operations for a given orthopedic problem. Then in a virtual environment (VE), the clock could be speeded up to predict the future outcome of different surgical approaches. In effect, the patient could leave the operating table, go through rehabilitation, and then return for evaluation. The surgeon could then pick the best choice for the real operation. This approach would need a model that was not only patient specific but also accurate in terms of the deformity and its response to treatment over time. This is the ultimate goal for the twenty-first century for a VR system in surgery. It is difficult to create a model of the human body that is realistic enough to accurately portray a surgical mission that is planned. The interface tools that are presently available are much more advanced than the ones discussed here that were available to NASA in the 1980s; however, without a true model to interact with they are unable to provide the realism for surgical education and training that is needed. Present cadaver laboratories and training through hands-on experience provide the majority of medical education today in surgery. It is unlikely that present VR simulators will change this without a significant improvements in the models. Most of the author's work has been directed at creating digital models of humans. Some of this work is reviewed and what needs to be done is emphasized, rather than focus on what has already been accomplished. Systems are presently available for many medical training applications, including microsurgery, urology, general surgery, heart surgery, vascular sur gery, eye surgery, otolaryngology, military wound d?bridement, and obstetrics. Ultimately these systems will be able to provide teaching at a distance for telemedicine and telesurgery. The goal of this chapter is to better define where is needed to make improvements in the human body models for all of these systems. Most of these systems assume normal tissue properties and do not address the response over time of the tissues to the disease state, to the surgical intervention, or to the healing process. The pathologic state of tissues and the tissue's response to interventions over time should be the next grand challenge in virtual reality and medicine.

  • Future Technologies for Medical Applications

    The modern age of surgery began at the end of the nineteenth century because medicine discovered the Industrial Age, with its wealth of revolutionary technologies such as anesthesia, asepsis, microscopy, and new materials. At the close of the twentieth century, the Information Age diffused into medicine, and a revolution of even greater magnitude occurred. To understand the change it is necessary to look outside of medicine to society as a whole and find the underlying principles, and then apply them within our discipline. The medical record is now becoming electronic and nearly all of our imaging has changed from film (atoms) to digital images (bits). Medical education is using computer-aided instructions, CD-ROM, and VR to simulate and supplement cadaver and animal models. With the new research in robotics, even our hand motions are being changed in to electronic signals and being sent from one place to another. The future of medicine is no longer blood and guts, but bits and bytes. A commonality of information enables us to tie together a whole new concept of how medicine could evolve, like an entire medical ecosystem, whereby discoveries in micro-sensors permits new imaging devices, which in turn enable new forms of image-based surgery. It is an upward spiral, one discovery providing a giant step forward toward the next technology and escalating the whole changing system logarithmically. This could help explain why we are all so overwhelmed by the rapidity of our changing profession. Yet the younger generation of physicians-to-be are not so uncomfortable with the rapidly changing technologies. One of their fundamental tools is the ability to understand the world in the form of three-dimensional (3-D) visualization. There is a speculative scenario that can be used as a framework to illuminate the integrating power of this concept. It is refe rred to as the ?>doorway to the future?> and extrapolates to 20, 50 or perhaps 100 years into the future. As a patient visits her surgeon for a consult, she passes through the office door and, just as scanning is performed today by airport security, she has multiple imaging modalities scanning her (perhaps CT, MRI, ultrasound, and infrared). The data are all collected and then displayed as a 3-D image of her (looking like the Visible Human) but with not only correct anatomic structure but also all the biochemical and other data added to the correct organ systems. If an abnormality is seen, such as a colon mass, a virtual colonoscopy can be done on the image by flying through the colon with the same view as an actual colonoscopy. If a lesion is found, the image can be used for patient education, illustrating to the patient exactly what her specific problem is. At the time of surgery, an image can be imported onto the video monitor of laparoscopic colon resection, and with data fusion the two images displayed simultaneously as an intraoperative navigation tool (stereotactic navigation). At the postoperative follow up visit, the patient is scanned again, by comparing the postoperative with the preoperative datasets and using digital subtraction techniques, the difference between the two datasets is automatic outcomes analysis. Because the record is a dataset, it can be stored on a credit card (the U.S. military is using a prototype card called the MARC card) or kept on a Web server to be distributed worldwide over the Internet for consultation. The purpose of the this scenario is to provide an explanation of and rationale for why it is so important to understand how information can empower us, to show the looking glass through which the next-generation surgeon will be viewing the world. To bring the scenario out of the speculative and rhetorical and into the real world, the...



Standards related to Cadaver

Back to Top

No standards are currently tagged "Cadaver"


Jobs related to Cadaver

Back to Top