Conferences related to Computer Graphics

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2013 IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR)

CVPR is the premiere annual Computer Vision event comprising the main CVPR conference and 27 co-located workshops and short courses. With its high quality and low cost, it provides an exceptional value for students, academics and industry.


2013 IEEE International Conference on Multimedia and Expo (ICME)

To promote the exchange of the latest advances in multimedia technologies, systems, and applications from both the research and development perspectives of the circuits and systems, communications, computer, and signal processing communities.

  • 2012 IEEE International Conference on Multimedia and Expo (ICME)

    IEEE International Conference on Multimedia & Expo (ICME) has been the flagship multimedia conference sponsored by four IEEE Societies. It exchanges the latest advances in multimedia technologies, systems, and applications from both the research and development perspectives of the circuits and systems, communications, computer, and signal processing communities.

  • 2011 IEEE International Conference on Multimedia and Expo (ICME)

    Speech, audio, image, video, text processing Signal processing for media integration 3D visualization, animation and virtual reality Multi-modal multimedia computing systems and human-machine interaction Multimedia communications and networking Multimedia security and privacy Multimedia databases and digital libraries Multimedia applications and services Media content analysis and search Hardware and software for multimedia systems Multimedia standards and related issues Multimedia qu

  • 2010 IEEE International Conference on Multimedia and Expo (ICME)

    A flagship multimedia conference sponsored by four IEEE societies, ICME serves as a forum to promote the exchange of the latest advances in multimedia technologies, systems, and applications from both the research and development perspectives of the circuits and systems, communications, computer, and signal processing communities.

  • 2009 IEEE International Conference on Multimedia and Expo (ICME)

    IEEE International Conference on Multimedia & Expo is a major annual international conference with the objective of bringing together researchers, developers, and practitioners from academia and industry working in all areas of multimedia. ICME serves as a forum for the dissemination of state-of-the-art research, development, and implementations of multimedia systems, technologies and applications.

  • 2008 IEEE International Conference on Multimedia and Expo (ICME)

    IEEE International Conference on Multimedia & Expo is a major annual international conference with the objective of bringing together researchers, developers, and practitioners from academia and industry working in all areas of multimedia. ICME serves as a forum for the dissemination of state-of-the-art research, development, and implementations of multimedia systems, technologies and applications.


2013 IEEE Virtual Reality (VR)

IEEE Virtual Reality is the premier international conference and exhibition on virtual reality.

  • 2012 IEEE Virtual Reality Workshops (VR)

    Immersive gaming 3D Interaction for VR VR systems and toolkits Augmented and mixed reality Computer graphics techniques Advanced display technology Immersive projection technology Multi-user and distributed VR and gaming Serious games Haptics, audio and other non-visual interfaces Tracking and Sensing Modeling and Simulation User studies and Evaluation Presence and Cognition Navigation Applications of AR/MR/VR

  • 2011 IEEE Virtual Reality (VR)

    IEEE Virtual Reality 2011 is the premier international conference and exhibition on virtual reality. It will be held on 19 23 March 2011 at SUNTEC Convention Center, Singapore. The conference focuses recent research and development in the fields of virtual environments, augmented reality, and 3D user interface.

  • 2010 IEEE Virtual Reality Conference (VR)

    IEEE VR 2010 is the premier international conference and exhibition in virtual reality. It provides a unique opportunity to interact with leading experts in VR and closely-related fields such as augmented reality, mixed reality and 3D user interfaces. Share your own work and educate yourself through exposure to the research of your peers from around the world.

  • 2009 IEEE Virtual Reality Conference (VR)

    Innovative research, groundbreaking technology, pioneering concepts and hands-on experiences in the disciplines of virtual reality, augmented reality, and 3D user interfaces is what IEEE VR 2009

  • 2008 IEEE Virtual Reality Conference (VR)

    The brightest minds, the most innovative research, the leading companies, and the most stimulating discussions in the fields of virtual environments, augmented reality, and 3D user interfaces.

  • 2007 IEEE Virtual Reality Conference (VR)

  • 2006 IEEE Virtual Reality Conference (VR)


2013 XXIV International Conference on Information, Communication and Automation Technologies (ICAT)

Computer Systems Architecture, Parallel and Distributed Computing, Software Engineering, Artificial and Swarm Intelligence, Soft-computing Methodologies and Evolutionary Computation, Image and Video Processing, Machine Learning and Knowledge Based Systems, Complex Systems: Modelling and Simulation, Linear, Non-linear and Hybrid Control, Predictive, Robust and Adaptive Control, Intelligent Control Systems, Sensors, Actuators and Mechatronic Systems, Robotics, Mobile Robots and Telerobotics, Motion Control Systems, Networked Controlled Systems, Real-time and Process Control, Computer and Microprocessor-Based Control, Fault Diagnostics and Fault Tolerant Systems, Electrical Machines and Drives, Drive Control and Applications, Hybrid Electric Vehicles, Mobile Computing and Networking, Network Protocols and Topologies, Network Architectures and Network-Based Applications, Wireless Communications, Quality of Service, Reliability and Performance Modelling and Network Measurement Techniques


2012 IEEE International Conference on Electro/Information Technology (EIT 2012)

This conference provides a high profile forum for disseminating the latest research on electrical and computer engineering with application in information technology. It brings together academic researchers, industrial scientists, and IT professionals from electrical engineering, computer engineering, computer science, and informatics to share late-breaking advances of these interdisciplinary fields.


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Periodicals related to Computer Graphics

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Computer

Computer, the flagship publication of the IEEE Computer Society, publishes peer-reviewed technical content that covers all aspects of computer science, computer engineering, technology, and applications. Computer is a resource that practitioners, researchers, and managers can rely on to provide timely information about current research developments, trends, best practices, and changes in the profession.


Computer Graphics and Applications, IEEE

IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications (CG&A) bridges the theory and practice of computer graphics. From specific algorithms to full system implementations, CG&A offers a strong combination of peer-reviewed feature articles and refereed departments, including news and product announcements. Special Applications sidebars relate research stories to commercial development. Cover stories focus on creative applications of the technology by an artist or ...


Multimedia, IEEE

IEEE Multimedia Magazine covers a broad range of issues in multimedia systems and applications. Articles, product reviews, new product descriptions, book reviews, and announcements of conferences and workshops cover topics that include hardware and software for media compression, coding and processing; media representations and standards for storage, editing, interchange, transmission and presentation; hardware platforms supporting multimedia applications; operating systems suitable ...


Visualization and Computer Graphics, IEEE Transactions on

Specific topics include, but are not limited to: a) visualization techniques and methodologies; b) visualization systems and software; c) volume visulaization; d) flow visualization; e) information visualization; f) multivariate visualization; g) modeling and surfaces; h) rendering techniques and methodologies; i) graphics systems and software; j) animation and simulation; k) user interfaces; l) virtual reality; m) visual programming and program visualization; ...



Most published Xplore authors for Computer Graphics

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Xplore Articles related to Computer Graphics

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Real-time 3-D face tracking and modeling from awebcam

Jongmoo Choi; Yann Dumortier; Sang-Il Choi; Muhammad Bilal Ahmad; Gérard Medioni 2012 IEEE Workshop on the Applications of Computer Vision (WACV), 2012

We first infer a 3-D face model from a single frontal image using automatically extracted 2-D landmarks and deforming a generic 3-D model. Then, for any input image, we extract feature points and track them in 2-D. Given these correspondences, sometimes noisy and incorrect, we robustly estimate the 3-D head pose using PnP and a RANSAC process. As the head ...


The role of externalisation in reasoning with self-constructed representations

R. Cox IEE Colloquium on Thinking with Diagrams (Digest No: 1996/010), 1996

This paper explores some of the issues related to the difference between selecting, constructing and using one's own external representations (ERs) versus using pre-fabricated ERs such as textbook diagrams. The focus is upon the role of externalising the representation during ER construction. Some of the issues addressed in this paper stem from a series of studies on how students reason ...


A study on assembling of sub pictures using approximate junctions

K. Morita; K. Kurosu Systems, Man, and Cybernetics, 1999. IEEE SMC '99 Conference Proceedings. 1999 IEEE International Conference on, 1999

It is important to develop a method of assembling a set of sub pictures automatically into a mosaic picture, because a view through fiberscopes or microscopes with higher magnifying power is much larger than the field of view taken by a camera. This paper presents a method of assembling sub pictures, where roughly estimated junctions called approximate junctions are employed ...


Configurable Flow Models for FPGA Particle Graphics Engines

Andrew J. Wong; Warren J. Gross 2008 16th International Symposium on Field-Programmable Custom Computing Machines, 2008

We describe the implementation of a hardware-accelerated particle graphics engine on a reconfigurable computer. The engine incorporates a configurable flow model that enables the simulation of complex spatially-dependent particle graphics effects. The FPGA particle engine was designed using the Mitrion-C high-level language, and did not require detailed hardware design. The engine was implemented on a SGI Altix 350 with four ...


An analysis of the Bunraku puppet's motions based on the phase correspondence of the puppet's motions axis-for the generation of humanoid robots motions with fertile emotions

H. Hattori; Y. Nakabo; S. Tadokoro; T. Takamori; K. Yamada Systems, Man, and Cybernetics, 1999. IEEE SMC '99 Conference Proceedings. 1999 IEEE International Conference on, 1999

In order to establish a method to generate humanoid robots motions with fertile emotions, the actions of a Bunraku puppet are measured and analyzed. Based on the motion axes of the Bunraku puppet, which represents primary part of motions, the emotional factors of the puppet's motion are represented in expansion and contraction of the puppet's motion time series. This method ...


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Educational Resources on Computer Graphics

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eLearning

Real-time 3-D face tracking and modeling from awebcam

Jongmoo Choi; Yann Dumortier; Sang-Il Choi; Muhammad Bilal Ahmad; Gérard Medioni 2012 IEEE Workshop on the Applications of Computer Vision (WACV), 2012

We first infer a 3-D face model from a single frontal image using automatically extracted 2-D landmarks and deforming a generic 3-D model. Then, for any input image, we extract feature points and track them in 2-D. Given these correspondences, sometimes noisy and incorrect, we robustly estimate the 3-D head pose using PnP and a RANSAC process. As the head ...


The role of externalisation in reasoning with self-constructed representations

R. Cox IEE Colloquium on Thinking with Diagrams (Digest No: 1996/010), 1996

This paper explores some of the issues related to the difference between selecting, constructing and using one's own external representations (ERs) versus using pre-fabricated ERs such as textbook diagrams. The focus is upon the role of externalising the representation during ER construction. Some of the issues addressed in this paper stem from a series of studies on how students reason ...


A study on assembling of sub pictures using approximate junctions

K. Morita; K. Kurosu Systems, Man, and Cybernetics, 1999. IEEE SMC '99 Conference Proceedings. 1999 IEEE International Conference on, 1999

It is important to develop a method of assembling a set of sub pictures automatically into a mosaic picture, because a view through fiberscopes or microscopes with higher magnifying power is much larger than the field of view taken by a camera. This paper presents a method of assembling sub pictures, where roughly estimated junctions called approximate junctions are employed ...


Configurable Flow Models for FPGA Particle Graphics Engines

Andrew J. Wong; Warren J. Gross 2008 16th International Symposium on Field-Programmable Custom Computing Machines, 2008

We describe the implementation of a hardware-accelerated particle graphics engine on a reconfigurable computer. The engine incorporates a configurable flow model that enables the simulation of complex spatially-dependent particle graphics effects. The FPGA particle engine was designed using the Mitrion-C high-level language, and did not require detailed hardware design. The engine was implemented on a SGI Altix 350 with four ...


An analysis of the Bunraku puppet's motions based on the phase correspondence of the puppet's motions axis-for the generation of humanoid robots motions with fertile emotions

H. Hattori; Y. Nakabo; S. Tadokoro; T. Takamori; K. Yamada Systems, Man, and Cybernetics, 1999. IEEE SMC '99 Conference Proceedings. 1999 IEEE International Conference on, 1999

In order to establish a method to generate humanoid robots motions with fertile emotions, the actions of a Bunraku puppet are measured and analyzed. Based on the motion axes of the Bunraku puppet, which represents primary part of motions, the emotional factors of the puppet's motion are represented in expansion and contraction of the puppet's motion time series. This method ...


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IEEE-USA E-Books

  • No title

    <p> New data acquisition techniques are emerging and are providing fast and efficient means for multidimensional spatial data collection. Airborne LIDAR surveys, SAR satellites, stereo-photogrammetry and mobile mapping systems are increasingly used for the digital reconstruction of the environment. All these systems provide extremely high volumes of raw data, often enriched with other sensor data (e.g., beam intensity). Improving methods to process and visually analyze this massive amount of geospatial and user-generated data is crucial to increase the efficiency of organizations and to better manage societal challenges. </p> <p> Within this context, this book proposes an up-to-date view of computational methods and tools for spatio-temporal data fusion, multivariate surface generation, and feature extraction, along with their main applications for surface approximation and rainfall analysis. The book is intended to attract interest from different fields, such s computer vision, computer graphics, geomatics, and remote sensing, working on the common goal of processing 3D data. To this end, it presents and compares methods that process and analyze the massive amount of geospatial data in order to support better management of societal challenges through more timely and better decision making, independent of a specific data modeling paradigm (e.g., 2D vector data, regular grids or 3D point clouds). </p> <p> We also show how current research is developing from the traditional layered approach, adopted by most GIS softwares, to intelligent methods for integrating existing data sets that might contain important information on a geographical area and environmental phenomenon. These services combine traditional map-oriented visualization with fully 3D visual decision support methods and exploit semantics-oriented information (e.g., a-priori knowledge, annotations, segmentations) when processing, merging, and integrating big pre-exis ing data sets. </p>

  • VEs in Medicine; Medicine in VEs

    The first developments in virtual environments (VEs) started in the 2nd century C.E., when the Greek Galen demonstrated the theory of the spatial perception of the left and right eye. That theory was a point of departure for the work by Wheatstone in 1833, to create a breakthrough with his stereoscope. An ingenious system of mirrors presented depth cues to a subject who looked at two perspective drawings. That was before photography was developed. Yet another breakthrough in the long history of VE technology was the demonstration of the experience theater called Sensorama by the American Morton Heilig (mid-1950s). Heilig, a photographer and designer of cameras and projectors in Hollywood, devised a machine to stimulate all human senses. VE techniques were developed worldwide by, among others, Ivan Sutherland and David Evans in the 1960s. Revolutionary developments in computer graphics display hardware and software revolutionized airline safety in the form of real-time interactive flight simulators. The real hype started in 1989, when Jaron Lanier, who is often called the step-father of VEs, generated business from VE technology. Charles Dotter started experimenting with threading radio- opaque catheters through blood vessels under fluoroscopic-image guidance in the 1960s. Those experiments were a trigger point for the avalanche of minimally invasive imaging procedures emerging today in clinical practice. Dotter was the first to interact and intervene with a patient in an indirect way: He looked at shadow images in stead of the patient. The first step toward medicine in VE was taken. This chapter advocates the use of VE technologies in the field of medicine to render medical services in a virtual world: to bring medical care to the patient and to improve care by dedicated training and skills building. This chapter begins by highlighting the technologies involved with VE and how these technologies create benefits for the medical community. The second part of the chapter illustrates that the combined efforts of the medical and computer societies have already created real products. However, there is still a lot of effort needed to revolutionize health care.

  • No title

    Rendering photorealistic images is a costly process which can take up to several days in the case of high quality images. In most cases, the task of sampling the incident radiance function to evaluate the illumination integral is responsible for an important share of the computation time. Therefore, to reach acceptable rendering times, the illumination integral must be evaluated using a limited set of samples. Such a restriction raises the question of how to obtain the most accurate approximation possible with such a limited set of samples. One must thus ensure that sampling produces the highest amount of information possible by carefully placing and weighting the limited set of samples. Furthermore, the integral evaluation should take into account not only the information brought by sampling but also possible information available prior to sampling, such as the integrand smoothness. This idea of sparse information and the need to fully exploit the little information available is pres nt throughout this book. The presented methods correspond to the state-of-the-art solutions in computer graphics, and take into account information which had so far been underexploited (or even neglected) by the previous approaches. The intended audiences are Ph.D. students and researchers in the field of realistic image synthesis or global illumination algorithms, or any person with a solid background in graphics and numerical techniques.

  • No title

    Linear complementarity problems (LCPs) have for many years been used in physics-based animation to model contact forces between rigid bodies in contact. More recently, LCPs have found their way into the realm of fluid dynamics. Here, LCPs are used to model boundary conditions with fluid-wall contacts. LCPs have also started to appear in deformable models and granular simulations. There is an increasing need for numerical methods to solve the resulting LCPs with all these new applications. This book provides a numerical foundation for such methods, especially suited for use in computer graphics. This book is mainly intended for a researcher/Ph.D. student/post-doc/professor who wants to study the algorithms and do more work/research in this area. Programmers might have to invest some time brushing up on math skills, for this we refer to Appendices A and B. The reader should be familiar with linear algebra and differential calculus. We provide pseudo code for all the numerical methods, w ich should be comprehensible by any computer scientist with rudimentary programming skills. The reader can find an online supplementary code repository, containing Matlab implementations of many of the core methods covered in these notes, as well as a few Python implementations [Erleben, 2011].

  • No title

    This book serves as a practical guide to simulation of 3D deformable solids using the Finite Element Method (FEM). It reviews a number of topics related to the theory and implementation of FEM approaches: measures of deformation, constitutive laws of nonlinear materials, tetrahedral discretizations, and model reduction techniques for real-time simulation. Simulations of deformable solids are important in many applications in computer graphics, including film special effects, computer games, and virtual surgery. The Finite Element Method has become a popular tool in many such applications. Variants of FEM catering to both offline and real-time simulation have had a mature presence in computer graphics literature. This book is designed for readers familiar with numerical simulation in computer graphics, who would like to obtain a cohesive picture of the various FEM simulation methods available, their strengths and weaknesses, and their applicability in various simulation scenarios. The ook is also a practical implementation guide for the visual effects developer, offering a lean yet adequate synopsis of the underlying mathematical theory. Chapter 1 introduces the quantitative descriptions used to capture the deformation of elastic solids, the concept of strain energy, and discusses how force and stress result as a response to deformation. Chapter 2 reviews a number of constitutive models, i.e., analytical laws linking deformation to the resulting force that has successfully been used in various graphics-oriented simulation tasks. Chapter 3 summarizes how deformation and force can be computed discretely on a tetrahedral mesh, and how an implicit integrator can be structured around this discretization. Finally, chapter 4 presents the state of the art in model reduction techniques for real-time FEM solid simulation and discusses which techniques are suitable for which applications. Topics discussed in this chapter include linear modal analysis, modal warping, subspace imulation, and domain decomposition.

  • No title

    This book presents techniques to render photo-realistic images by programming the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). We discuss effects such as mirror reflections, refractions, caustics, diffuse or glossy indirect illumination, radiosity, single or multiple scattering in participating media, tone reproduction, glow, and depth of field. The book targets game developers, graphics programmers, and also students with some basic understanding of computer graphics algorithms, rendering APIs like Direct3D or OpenGL, and shader programming. In order to make the book self-contained, the most important concepts of local illumination and global illumination rendering, graphics hardware, and Direct3D/HLSL programming are reviewed in the first chapters. After these introductory chapters we warm up with simple methods including shadow and environment mapping, then we move on toward advanced concepts aiming at global illumination rendering. Since it would have been impossible to give a rigorous review f all approaches proposed in this field, we go into the details of just a few methods solving each particular global illumination effect. However, a short discussion of the state of the art and links to the bibliography are also provided to refer the interested reader to techniques that are not detailed in this book. The implementation of the selected methods is also presented in HLSL, and we discuss their observed performance, merits, and disadvantages. In the last chapter, we also review how these techniques can be integrated in an advanced game engine and present case studies of their exploitation in games. Having gone through this book, the reader will have an overview of the state of the art, will be able to apply and improve these techniques, and most importantly, will be capable of developing brand new GPU algorithms. Table of Contents: Global Illumintation Rendering / Local Illumination Rendering Pipeline of GPUs / Programming and Controlling GPUs / Simple Improvements of the ocal Illumination Model / Ray Casting on the GPU / Specular Effects with Rasterization / Diffuse and Glossy Indirect Illumination / Pre-computation Aided Global Illumination / Participating Media Rendering / Fake Global Illumination / Postprocessing Effects / Integrating GI Effects in Games and Virtual Reality Systems / Bibliography

  • References

    This textbook provides a thorough introduction to the field of learning from experimental data and soft computing. Support vector machines (SVM) and neural networks (NN) are the mathematical structures, or models, that underlie learning, while fuzzy logic systems (FLS) enable us to embed structured human knowledge into workable algorithms. The book assumes that it is not only useful, but necessary, to treat SVM, NN, and FLS as parts of a connected whole. Throughout, the theory and algorithms are illustrated by practical examples, as well as by problem sets and simulated experiments. This approach enables the reader to develop SVM, NN, and FLS in addition to understanding them. The book also presents three case studies: on NN-based control, financial time series analysis, and computer graphics. A solutions manual and all of the MATLAB programs needed for the simulated experiments are available.

  • No title

    Quaternion multiplication can be used to rotate vectors in three-dimensions. Therefore, in computer graphics, quaternions have three principal applications: to increase speed and reduce storage for calculations involving rotations, to avoid distortions arising from numerical inaccuracies caused by floating point computations with rotations, and to interpolate between two rotations for key frame animation. Yet while the formal algebra of quaternions is well-known in the graphics community, the derivations of the formulas for this algebra and the geometric principles underlying this algebra are not well understood. The goals of this monograph are to provide a fresh, geometric interpretation for quaternions, appropriate for contemporary computer graphics, based on mass-points; to present better ways to visualize quaternions, and the effect of quaternion multiplication on points and vectors in three dimensions using insights from the algebra and geometry of multiplication in the complex p ane; to derive the formula for quaternion multiplication from first principles; to develop simple, intuitive proofs of the sandwiching formulas for rotation and reflection; to show how to apply sandwiching to compute perspective projections. In addition to these theoretical issues, we also address some computational questions. We develop straightforward formulas for converting back and forth between quaternion and matrix representations for rotations, reflections, and perspective projections, and we discuss the relative advantages and disadvantages of the quaternion and matrix representations for these transformations. Moreover, we show how to avoid distortions due to floating point computations with rotations by using unit quaternions to represent rotations. We also derive the formula for spherical linear interpolation, and we explain how to apply this formula to interpolate between two rotations for key frame animation. Finally, we explain the role of quaternions in low-dimensional lifford algebras, and we show how to apply the Clifford algebra for R3 to model rotations, reflections, and perspective projections. To help the reader understand the concepts and formulas presented here, we have incorporated many exercises in order to clarify and elaborate some of the key points in the text. Table of Contents: Preface / Theory / Computation / Rethinking Quaternions and Clif ford Algebras / References / Further Reading / Author Biography

  • No title

    Plants and trees are among the most complex natural objects. Much work has been done attempting to model them, with varying degrees of success. In this book, we review the various approaches in computer graphics, which we categorize as rule-based, image-based, and sketch-based methods. We describe our approaches for modeling plants and trees using images. Image-based approaches have the distinct advantage that the resulting model inherits the realistic shape and complexity of a real plant or tree. We use different techniques for modeling plants (with relatively large leaves) and trees (with relatively small leaves).With plants, we model each leaf from images, while for trees, the leaves are only approximated due to their small size and large number. Both techniques start with the same initial step of structure from motion on multiple images of the plant or tree that is to be modeled. For our plant modeling system, because we need to model the individual leaves, these leaves need to be segmented out from the images. We designed our plant modeling system to be interactive, automating the process of shape recovery while relying on the user to provide simple hints on segmentation. Segmentation is performed in both image and 3D spaces, allowing the user to easily visualize its effect immediately. Using the segmented image and 3D data, the geometry of each leaf is then automatically recovered from the multiple views by fitting a deformable leaf model. Our system also allows the user to easily reconstruct branches in a similar manner. To model trees, because of the large leaf count, small image footprint, and widespread occlusions, we do not model the leaves exactly as we do for plants. Instead, we populate the tree with leaf replicas from segmented source images to reconstruct the overall tree shape. In addition, we use the shape patterns of visible branches to predict those of obscured branches. As a result, we are able to design our tree modeling system so as to minimi e user intervention. We also handle the special case of modeling a tree from only a single image. Here, the user is required to draw strokes on the image to indicate the tree crown (so that the leaf region is approximately known) and to refine the recovery of branches. As before, we concatenate the shape patterns from a library to generate the 3D shape. To substantiate the effectiveness of our systems, we show realistic reconstructions of a variety of plants and trees from images. Finally, we offer our thoughts on improving our systems and on the remaining challenges associated with plant and tree modeling. Table of Contents: Introduction / Review of Plant and Tree Modeling Techniques / Image- Based Technique for Modeling Plants / Image-Based Technique for Modeling Trees / Single Image Tree Modeling / Summary and Concluding Remarks / Acknowledgments

  • No title

    Interactive display and visualization of large geometric and textured models is becoming a fundamental capability. There are numerous application areas, including games, movies, CAD, virtual prototyping, and scientific visualization. One of observations about geometric models used in interactive applications is that their model complexity continues to increase because of fundamental advances in 3D modeling, simulation, and data capture technologies. As computing power increases, users take advantage of the algorithmic advances and generate even more complex models and data sets. Therefore, there are many cases where we are required to visualize massive models that consist of hundreds of millions of triangles and, even, billions of triangles. However, interactive visualization and handling of such massive models still remains a challenge in computer graphics and visualization. In this monograph we discuss various techniques that enable interactive visualization of massive models. These techniques include visibility computation, simplification, levels-of-detail, and cache-coherent data management.We believe that the combinations of these techniques can make it possible to interactively visualize massive models in commodity hardware. Table of Contents: Introduction / Visibility / Simplification and Levels of Detail / Alternative Representations / Cache-Coherent Data Management / Conclusions / Bibliography