Conferences related to Game Development

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2014 IEEE Conference on Computational Intelligence and Games (CIG)

Games can be used as a challenging scenery for benchmarking methods from computational intelligencesince they provide dynamic and competitive elements that are germane to real-world problems. This conference brings together leading researchers andpractitioners from academia and industry to discuss recent advances and explore future directions in this field.

  • 2012 IEEE Conference on Computational Intelligence and Games (CIG)

    Games provide dynamic environments modelling many real-world problems and methods from computational intelligence promise to having a big impact on game technology and development. CIG 2012 brings together leading researchers, designers, developers, and practitioners from academia and industry to discuss recent advances and explore future directions in this ever changing field.

  • 2011 IEEE Conference on Computational Intelligence and Games (CIG)

    Games have proven to be an ideal domain for the study of computational intelligence as not only are they fun to play and interesting to observe, but they provide competitive and dynamic environments that model many real-world problems. The 2010 IEEE Symposium on Computational Intelligence and Games brings together leading researchers and practitioners from academia and industry to discuss recent advances and explore future directions in this field.

  • 2010 IEEE Symposium on Computational Intelligence and Games (CIG)

    Games have proven to be an ideal domain for the study of computational intelligence as not only are they fun to play and interesting to observe, but they provide competitive and dynamic environments that model many real-world problems. The 2010 IEEE Symposium on Computational Intelligence and Games brings together leading researchers and practitioners from academia and industry to discuss recent advances and explore future directions in this field.

  • 2009 IEEE Symposium on Computational Intelligence and Games (CIG)

    The 2009 IEEE Symposium on Computational Intelligence and Games brings together leading researchers and practitioners from academia and industry to discuss recent advances and explore future directions in the area of computational intelligence applied to games.

  • 2008 IEEE Symposium on Computational Intelligence and Games (CIG)


2014 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE)

The Frontiers in Education (FIE)Conference is the major international conference about educational innovations and research in engineering and computing. FIE 2014 continues a long tradition of disseminating results in these areas. It is an ideal forum for sharing ideas; learning about developments in computer science, engineering, and technology education; and interacting with colleagues in these fields.

  • 2013 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE)

    The Frontiers in Education (FIE)Conference is the major international conference about educational innovations and research in engineering and computing. FIE 2013 continues a long tradition of disseminating results in these areas. It is an ideal forum for sharing ideas; learning about developments in computer science, engineering, and technology education; and interacting with colleagues in these fields.

  • 2012 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE)

    The Frontiers in Education (FIE)Conference is the major international conference about educational innovations and research in engineering and computing. FIE 2012 continues a long tradition of disseminating results in these areas. It is an ideal forum for sharing ideas; learning about developments in computer science, engineering, and technology education; and interacting with colleagues in these fields.

  • 2011 Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE)

    The Frontiers in Education (FIE) Conference is the major international conference about educational innovations and research in engineering and computing. FIE 2011 continues a long tradition of disseminating results in these areas. It is an ideal forum for sharing ideas; learning about developments in computer science, engineering, and technology education; and interacting with colleagues in these fields.

  • 2010 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE)

    (FIE) Conference is a major international conference devoted to improvements in computer science, engineering, and technology (CSET) education. FIE 2008 continues a long tradition of disseminating educational research results and innovative practices in CSET education. It is an ideal forum for sharing ideas, learning about developments in CSET education, and interacting with colleagues.

  • 2009 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE)

    FIE is a major international conference devoted to improvements in computer science, engineering and technology (CSET) education. FIE continues a loong tradition of disseminating educational research results and innovative practices in CSET education. It is an ideal forum for sharing ideas, learning about developments in CSET education, and interacting with colleagues.

  • 2008 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE)

  • 2007 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE)

    Globalization has dramatically changed engineering. Global engineering teams design products for global markets. Knowledge has no borders in a world where information flow is digitalized and sent worldwide in seconds. A core requirement of engineering globalization is an understanding of how the different cultures of the global marketplace shape product development, mult-national engineering teams, and consumer expectations. Engineering education must address this issue.

  • 2006 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE)


2013 IEEE International Symposium on Haptic Audio Visual Environments and Games (HAVE)

Papers are being solicited on all aspects of multimodal haptic audio visual virtual environment technologies and related haptic applications, including Haptic sensors and renderers, Hapto-audio-visual systems and applications, Hapto-sergical/medical systems, Haptic compression and prediction, multimodal perception and psychophysics, Haptic game interfaces, tele-haptics and tele-operation, augmented and virtualized reality, collaborative virtual environments, human-computer interaction in virtual environment

  • 2012 IEEE International Workshop on Haptic Audio Visual Environments and Games (HAVE 2012)

    Papers are being solicited on all aspects of multimodal haptic audio visual virtual environment technologies and related haptic applications, including Haptic sensors and renderers,Hapto-audio -visual systems and applications, Hapto -surgical/medical systems, Haptic compression and prediction, multimodal perception and psychophysics, Haptic game interfaces, tele -haptics and tele - operation, augmented and virtualized reality, collaborative virtual environments, human -computer interaction in virtual environment.

  • 2011 IEEE International Workshop on Haptic Audio Visual Environments and Games (HAVE 2011)

    Papers are being solicited on all aspects of multimodal haptic audio visual virtual environment technologies and related haptic applications, including Haptic sensors and renderers, Hapto-audio-visual systems and applications, Hapto-surgical/medical systems, Haptic compression and prediction, multimodal perception and psychophysics, Haptic game interfaces, tele-haptics and tele-operation, augmented and virtualized reality, collaborative virtual environments, human-computer interaction in virtual environment

  • 2010 IEEE International Workshop on Haptic Audio Visual Environments and Games (HAVE 2010)

    Papers are being solicited on all aspects of multimodal haptic and audio visual virtual environment technologies and related applications such as tele-haptic robotics, design, tele-medicine, arts, education and training, Entertainment and Games. Topics of interest include but are not limited to Haptic sensors and renderers, Hapto-audio-visual systems and applications, multimodal perception and psychophysics, game interfaces (specially haptics interfaces), tele-haptics and tele-operation, augmented and virtu

  • 2009 IEEE International Workshop on Haptic Audio Visual Environments and Games (HAVE 2009)

    Papers are being solicited on all aspects of multimodal haptic and audio visual virtual environment technologies and related applications such as tele-haptic robotics, design, tele-medicine, arts, education and training, Entertainment and Games.


2012 IEEE 12th International Conference on Advanced Learning Technologies (ICALT)

ICALT is an annual international conference on Advanced Learning Technologies and Technology-enhanced Learning. The scope of the conference is to provide a forum for exchange of ideas among interested practitioners, researchers, developers, maintainers, users and students in the field of Advanced Learning Technologies and Technology-enhanced Learning.

  • 2011 11th IEEE International Conference on Advanced Learning Technologies (ICALT)

    ICALT is an annual international conference on Advanced Learning Technologies and Technology-enhanced Learning. The scope of the conference is to provide a forum for exchange of ideas among interested practitioners, researchers, developers, maintainers, users and students in the field of Advanced Learning Technologies and Technology-enhanced Learning

  • 2010 IEEE 10th International Conference on Advanced Learning Technologies (ICALT)

    ICALT is an annual international conference on Advanced Learning Technologies and Technology-enhanced Learning organized by IEEE Computer Society and IEEE Technical Committee on Learning Technology. After its kick-off as IWALT in Palmerston North, New Zealand (2000), ICALT has been held in New Zealand (2000), Madisson, USA (2001), Kazan, Russia (2002), Athens, Greece(2003), Joensuu, Finland (2004), Kaohsiung, Taiwan (2005), Kerkade, The Netherlands (2006), Niigata, Japan (2007), Santander, Spain (2008), Rig

  • 2009 IEEE International Conference on Advanced Learning Technologies (ICALT)

    CALT is an annual international conference on Advanced Learning Technologies and Technology-enhanced Learning organized by IEEE Computer Society and IEEE Technical Committee on Learning Technology.


2012 IEEE International Games Innovation Conference (IGIC)

This conference aims to be a platform for disseminating peer -reviewed papers, state - of-the-art demonstrations and special sessions that describe innovative research and development of hardware and software game technologies. Participation from industry, academia and government are welcome.


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Periodicals related to Game Development

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Computer

Computer, the flagship publication of the IEEE Computer Society, publishes peer-reviewed technical content that covers all aspects of computer science, computer engineering, technology, and applications. Computer is a resource that practitioners, researchers, and managers can rely on to provide timely information about current research developments, trends, best practices, and changes in the profession.


Computer Graphics and Applications, IEEE

IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications (CG&A) bridges the theory and practice of computer graphics. From specific algorithms to full system implementations, CG&A offers a strong combination of peer-reviewed feature articles and refereed departments, including news and product announcements. Special Applications sidebars relate research stories to commercial development. Cover stories focus on creative applications of the technology by an artist or ...


Software, IEEE

IEEE Software's mission is to build the community of leading and future software practitioners. The magazine delivers reliable, useful, leading-edge software development information to keep engineers and managers abreast of rapid technology change. The authority on translating software theory into practice, IEEE Software is positioned between pure research and pure practice, transferring ideas, methods, and experiences among researchers and engineers. ...




Xplore Articles related to Game Development

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A Study on User Experience of Online Games

Hongxing Peng; Hongzhi Song; Zhengwu Zhang; Yan Chen; Xiangjun Zou; Lei Xiao 2009 WRI World Congress on Software Engineering, 2009

User experience issues in online games are studied with the theory and method of user-centered design and game playability as the breakthrough point, and then we can get the design guidelines about the user experience. According to the data and then we use factor analysis and correlation analysis to study the degree of correlation between the various indicators and player ...


Multimedia at Work: Games in the Classroom at the Rochester Institute of Technology: A Case Study

Andrew M. Phelps; Christopher A. Egert; Jessica D. Bayliss IEEE MultiMedia, 2009

This article explores curricular approaches designed to motivate students in computing through the use of games as an application domain. The authors examine three approaches: a games-centric introductory programming sequence, the incorporation of game-based projects into core courses, and the creation of virtual environments that mimic multiplayer online games.


3D stereoscopic game development technique for smart TVs

Laisa C. P. Costa; Ana G. D. Correa; Marcelo A José; Erich P. Lotto; Alexandre A. G. Martinazzo; Leandro C. Biazon; Irene K. Ficheman; Mario Nagamura; Roseli D. Lopes; Marcelo K. Zuffo 2014 IEEE International Conference on Consumer Electronics (ICCE), 2014

A 3D stereoscopic high definition game technique developed for Smart television sets is presented. Despite its limited processing power and low memory, the technique takes advantage of embedded television set streaming feature and user-controlled 2D objects. In order to test the technique, we developed a game for a commercial television. As a result, a new technique and an immersive challenging ...


Using technology and innovation to simulate daily life

M. Macedonia Computer, 2000

"The Sims" is a synthetic doll's house embodied in a computer game. Besides topping sales charts and generating endless discussions among computer gamers, The Sims has received attention from various prestigious publications. Far more than a doll's house, The Sims evokes comparisons to a Greek myth in which you can play the deity, manipulating the lives of unaware humans. The ...


Serious Game Development as a Creative Learning Experience: Lessons Learnt

Varvara Garneli; Michail N. Giannakos; Konstantinos Chorianopoulos; Letizia Jaccheri 2015 IEEE/ACM 4th International Workshop on Games and Software Engineering, 2015

Computer programming skills in younger ages seem to be a promising and challenging aspect. Many visual programming tools have been developed in order to assist young students and to improve the current teaching practices and pedagogies. In this paper, we explore the potential effects of a Project Based Learning (PjBL) approach in the field of computer programming. In particular, we ...


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Educational Resources on Game Development

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eLearning

A Study on User Experience of Online Games

Hongxing Peng; Hongzhi Song; Zhengwu Zhang; Yan Chen; Xiangjun Zou; Lei Xiao 2009 WRI World Congress on Software Engineering, 2009

User experience issues in online games are studied with the theory and method of user-centered design and game playability as the breakthrough point, and then we can get the design guidelines about the user experience. According to the data and then we use factor analysis and correlation analysis to study the degree of correlation between the various indicators and player ...


Multimedia at Work: Games in the Classroom at the Rochester Institute of Technology: A Case Study

Andrew M. Phelps; Christopher A. Egert; Jessica D. Bayliss IEEE MultiMedia, 2009

This article explores curricular approaches designed to motivate students in computing through the use of games as an application domain. The authors examine three approaches: a games-centric introductory programming sequence, the incorporation of game-based projects into core courses, and the creation of virtual environments that mimic multiplayer online games.


3D stereoscopic game development technique for smart TVs

Laisa C. P. Costa; Ana G. D. Correa; Marcelo A José; Erich P. Lotto; Alexandre A. G. Martinazzo; Leandro C. Biazon; Irene K. Ficheman; Mario Nagamura; Roseli D. Lopes; Marcelo K. Zuffo 2014 IEEE International Conference on Consumer Electronics (ICCE), 2014

A 3D stereoscopic high definition game technique developed for Smart television sets is presented. Despite its limited processing power and low memory, the technique takes advantage of embedded television set streaming feature and user-controlled 2D objects. In order to test the technique, we developed a game for a commercial television. As a result, a new technique and an immersive challenging ...


Using technology and innovation to simulate daily life

M. Macedonia Computer, 2000

"The Sims" is a synthetic doll's house embodied in a computer game. Besides topping sales charts and generating endless discussions among computer gamers, The Sims has received attention from various prestigious publications. Far more than a doll's house, The Sims evokes comparisons to a Greek myth in which you can play the deity, manipulating the lives of unaware humans. The ...


Serious Game Development as a Creative Learning Experience: Lessons Learnt

Varvara Garneli; Michail N. Giannakos; Konstantinos Chorianopoulos; Letizia Jaccheri 2015 IEEE/ACM 4th International Workshop on Games and Software Engineering, 2015

Computer programming skills in younger ages seem to be a promising and challenging aspect. Many visual programming tools have been developed in order to assist young students and to improve the current teaching practices and pedagogies. In this paper, we explore the potential effects of a Project Based Learning (PjBL) approach in the field of computer programming. In particular, we ...


More eLearning Resources

IEEE-USA E-Books

  • The Desert of the Unreal: Democracy and Military-Funded Videogames and Simulations

    This chapter contains sections titled: The Tactical Iraqi Case Study, The Virtual Iraq Case Study, The Palace of Memory, Identity in Play, Trust and Face, Critical Play, Testing the Prototypes: Gamer Culture and Primary Reception, Backlash in the Professional Game Development Community, Language Games in Tactical Iraqi, Res Publica: Videogames and the Material Culture of Civic Life

  • World 4: Interactive Game Development Tools

    This chapter contains sections titled: World 4-1: Engineering Interactivity, World 4-2: Interactive Artistry, World 4-3: Designing Interactivity Interactively, World 4-4: Keeping Things Synched, World 4 Boss Fight: This Ain't Anything like Grandma's Boy

  • Contributors

    Even as the field of game studies has flourished, critical historical studies of games have lagged behind other areas of research. Histories have generally been fact-by-fact chronicles; fundamental terms of game design and development, technology, and play have rarely been examined in the context of their historical, etymological, and conceptual underpinnings. This volume attempts to "debug" the flawed historiography of video games. It offers original essays on key concepts in game studies, arranged as in a lexicon -- from "Amusement Arcade" to "Embodiment" and "Game Art" to "Simulation" and "World Building." Written by scholars and practitioners from a variety of disciplines, including game development, curatorship, media archaeology, cultural studies, and technology studies, the essays offer a series of distinctive critical "takes" on historical topics. The majority of essays look at game history from the outside in; some take deep dives into the histories of play and simu ation to provide context for the development of electronic and digital games; others take on such technological components of games as code and audio. Not all essays are history or historical etymology -- there is an analysis of game design, and a discussion of intellectual property -- but they nonetheless raise questions for historians to consider. Taken together, the essays offer a foundation for the emerging study of game history. **Contributors**Marcelo Aranda, Brooke Belisle, Caetlin Benson-Allott, Stephanie Boluk, Jennifer deWinter, J. P. Dyson, Kate Edwards, Mary Flanagan, Jacob Gaboury, William Gibbons, Raiford Guins, Erkki Huhtamo, Don Ihde, Jon Ippolito, Katherine Isbister, Mikael Jakobsson, Steven E. Jones, Jesper Juul, Eric Kaltman, Matthew G. Kirschenbaum, Carly A. Kocurek, Peter Krapp, Patrick LeMieux, Henry Lowood, Esther MacCallum-Stewart, Ken S. McAllister, Nick Monfort, David Myers, James Newman, Jenna Ng, Michael Nitsche, Laine Nooney, Hector Postigo, Jas urewal, Rene?? H. Reynolds, Judd Ethan Ruggill, Marie-Laure Ryan, Katie Salen Tekinba??, Anastasia Salter, Mark Sample, Bobby Schweizer, John Sharp, Miguel Sicart, Rebecca Elisabeth Skinner, Melanie Swalwell, David Thomas, Samuel Tobin, Emma Witkowski, Mark J.P. Wolf

  • Artisanal Local Networks: Game Work and Culture in Independent Game Production

    This chapter is particularly concerned with the synergies between independent game production and developers game cultures. It relies on a cultural industry approach to game work as cultural work, while engaging with the community-of- practice (CoP) framework to understand the internal dynamics of developers artisanal local networks. The chapter attempts to describe and reflect on the daily work practices of independent game developers, with special emphasis on a local network in Cambridge, and to provide an understanding of the microsocial relationships that structure their process of game making, both spatially and procedurally. In addition, it is set to explore the meanings and functions of these relationships, which is driven by the pleasures of work/play as suggested by N. Dyer-Witheford and G. De Peuter and C. ODonnell as well as shaped by the need to socially ensure access to technical, intellectual, and economic sources of game development.

  • Culturalization

    Even as the field of game studies has flourished, critical historical studies of games have lagged behind other areas of research. Histories have generally been fact-by-fact chronicles; fundamental terms of game design and development, technology, and play have rarely been examined in the context of their historical, etymological, and conceptual underpinnings. This volume attempts to "debug" the flawed historiography of video games. It offers original essays on key concepts in game studies, arranged as in a lexicon -- from "Amusement Arcade" to "Embodiment" and "Game Art" to "Simulation" and "World Building." Written by scholars and practitioners from a variety of disciplines, including game development, curatorship, media archaeology, cultural studies, and technology studies, the essays offer a series of distinctive critical "takes" on historical topics. The majority of essays look at game history from the outside in; some take deep dives into the histories of play and simu ation to provide context for the development of electronic and digital games; others take on such technological components of games as code and audio. Not all essays are history or historical etymology -- there is an analysis of game design, and a discussion of intellectual property -- but they nonetheless raise questions for historians to consider. Taken together, the essays offer a foundation for the emerging study of game history. **Contributors**Marcelo Aranda, Brooke Belisle, Caetlin Benson-Allott, Stephanie Boluk, Jennifer deWinter, J. P. Dyson, Kate Edwards, Mary Flanagan, Jacob Gaboury, William Gibbons, Raiford Guins, Erkki Huhtamo, Don Ihde, Jon Ippolito, Katherine Isbister, Mikael Jakobsson, Steven E. Jones, Jesper Juul, Eric Kaltman, Matthew G. Kirschenbaum, Carly A. Kocurek, Peter Krapp, Patrick LeMieux, Henry Lowood, Esther MacCallum-Stewart, Ken S. McAllister, Nick Monfort, David Myers, James Newman, Jenna Ng, Michael Nitsche, Laine Nooney, Hector Postigo, Jas urewal, Rene?? H. Reynolds, Judd Ethan Ruggill, Marie-Laure Ryan, Katie Salen Tekinba??, Anastasia Salter, Mark Sample, Bobby Schweizer, John Sharp, Miguel Sicart, Rebecca Elisabeth Skinner, Melanie Swalwell, David Thomas, Samuel Tobin, Emma Witkowski, Mark J.P. Wolf

  • Index

    Even as the field of game studies has flourished, critical historical studies of games have lagged behind other areas of research. Histories have generally been fact-by-fact chronicles; fundamental terms of game design and development, technology, and play have rarely been examined in the context of their historical, etymological, and conceptual underpinnings. This volume attempts to "debug" the flawed historiography of video games. It offers original essays on key concepts in game studies, arranged as in a lexicon -- from "Amusement Arcade" to "Embodiment" and "Game Art" to "Simulation" and "World Building." Written by scholars and practitioners from a variety of disciplines, including game development, curatorship, media archaeology, cultural studies, and technology studies, the essays offer a series of distinctive critical "takes" on historical topics. The majority of essays look at game history from the outside in; some take deep dives into the histories of play and simu ation to provide context for the development of electronic and digital games; others take on such technological components of games as code and audio. Not all essays are history or historical etymology -- there is an analysis of game design, and a discussion of intellectual property -- but they nonetheless raise questions for historians to consider. Taken together, the essays offer a foundation for the emerging study of game history. **Contributors**Marcelo Aranda, Brooke Belisle, Caetlin Benson-Allott, Stephanie Boluk, Jennifer deWinter, J. P. Dyson, Kate Edwards, Mary Flanagan, Jacob Gaboury, William Gibbons, Raiford Guins, Erkki Huhtamo, Don Ihde, Jon Ippolito, Katherine Isbister, Mikael Jakobsson, Steven E. Jones, Jesper Juul, Eric Kaltman, Matthew G. Kirschenbaum, Carly A. Kocurek, Peter Krapp, Patrick LeMieux, Henry Lowood, Esther MacCallum-Stewart, Ken S. McAllister, Nick Monfort, David Myers, James Newman, Jenna Ng, Michael Nitsche, Laine Nooney, Hector Postigo, Jas urewal, Rene?? H. Reynolds, Judd Ethan Ruggill, Marie-Laure Ryan, Katie Salen Tekinba??, Anastasia Salter, Mark Sample, Bobby Schweizer, John Sharp, Miguel Sicart, Rebecca Elisabeth Skinner, Melanie Swalwell, David Thomas, Samuel Tobin, Emma Witkowski, Mark J.P. Wolf

  • Game Development

    This chapter contains sections titled: Emergence of the Term, Digital Game Development, Notes, Works Cited

  • Gaming with Purpose: Heuristic Understanding of Ubiquitous Game Development and Design for Human Computation

    In technology, the growth of ubiquitous computing and the increased use of human computation games (HCGs) create a possibility space for games that convert the serious business of work into the seriously engaging experience of play. HCGs have witnessed a significant growth in the last few years. This chapter outlines the defining characteristics of HCGs. It also outlines the design concept of the human cloud for HCGs. The chapter provides an overview of design patterns in games based on heuristic analysis. There are two dichotomous solutions to the design of HCGs. The first is to determine the problem to be solved and then apply an appropriate game design to it. The second solution is to reverse engineer the game solution by starting with a game. The chapter concludes with a discussion on design models for creating ubiquitous and persuasive play using HCGs.



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