Conferences related to Business Strategy

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2013 IEEE 15th Conference on Business Informatics (CBI)

The IEEE Conference on Business Informatics seeks for methodological approaches to describe, explain, predict, and design information and communication models, architectures, and systems for the business environment. A key characteristic of business informatics research is that it considers a real-world business context in developing new theories and concepts that enable new practical applications. Thereby, business informatics research does not only extend the body of knowledge of the information society, but at the same time provides a tangible impact to industry.

  • 2012 IEEE 14th International Conference on Commerce and Enterprise Computing (CEC)

    The IEEE International Conference on Commerce and Enterprise Computing (CEC) is the premier forum for researchers and practitioners to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, results, experiences and concerns in selected areas at the realm of the convergence between Business and Informatics. This convergence includes work in E-Commerce, Enterprise Computing, Technology-enabled Business Models and Transformation as well as specific Information Systems in Industries. The program of CEC 2012 will consist of invited talks, technical paper presentations, tutorials, industry sessions, workshops, and panel discussions representing both foundational contributions and applied research.

  • 2011 IEEE 13th Conference on Commerce and Enterprise Computing (CEC)

    The aim of the forum is to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, results, experiences and concerns in the field of E-Commerce technologies and Enterprise Computing, including Business Process Modeling and Management, Digital Ecosystems, Enterprise Architectures, Cloud Computing, and Green IT/Green Supply Chains.

  • 2010 IEEE 12th Conference on Commerce and Enterprise Computing (CEC)

    Commerce and Business System Architectures Electronic Commerce Technologies Business Process Management Business Intelligence Business Services Semantic Web and Ontological Engineering Mobile Business Applications Security and Trust Human Computer Interaction Cloud Computing Enterprise Green Computing and Energy Trading Software as a Service (SaaS)

  • 2009 IEEE Conference on Commerce and Enterprise Computing (CEC)

    The 11th IEEE Conference on Commerce and Enterprise Computing (CEC 09) results of a merger of the two annual flagship conferences of the IEEE Computer Society Technical Committee on E-Commerce: the IEEE Conference on E-Commerce Technology (CEC) and the IEEE Conference on Enterprise Computing, E-Commerce, and E-Services (EEE). Given its new title, the conference provides a platform for researchers and practitioners interested in theory and practice of technologies.

  • 2008 10th IEEE Conference on E-Commerce Technology and the 5th IEEE Conference on Enterprise Computing, E-Commerce and E-Services (CEC/EEE)

    This conference is a platform for researchers and practitioners interested in the theory and practice of E-Commerce and Enterprise Computing. We will focus on new technologies and methods that enable business processes to smoothly extend in a cross-enterprise environment

  • 2007 9th IEEE Conference on E-Commerce Technology & 4th IEEE Conference on Enterprise Computing, E-Commerce, & E-Services (CEC/EEE)

  • 2006 8th IEEE Conference on E-Commerce Technology & 3rd IEEE Conference on Enterprise Computing, E-Commerce, & E-Services (CEC/EEE)


2013 International Conference on Management Science and Engineering (ICMSE)

Management science and engineering, including operations research, organizational systems and behavior, economics and finance, and public administration.


2012 IEEE International Conference on Industrial Engineering and Engineering Management (IEEM)

All areas related to industrial engineering and engineering management.


2012 Portland International Conference on Management of Engineering & Technology (PICMET)

PICMET's focus is on bringing together the experts on technology management to address the issues involved in managing current and emerging technologies.


2011 3rd International Conference on Computer and Automation Engineering (ICCAE)

On the successful basis of ICCAE 2009 and ICCAE 2010, 2011 3rd International Conference on Computer and Automation Engineering (ICCAE 2011) will be held in Chongqing, China from January 21 - 23, 2010. ICCAE 2011 is co-sponsored by Singapore Institute of Electronics and University of Electronics Science and Technology of China (UESTC), and technical Co-sponsored by IEEE, IEEE Computational Intelligence Society, the Chongqing University, IACSIT, and Northeastern University of China.

  • 2010 The 2nd International Conference on Computer and Automation Engineering (ICCAE)

    The aim objective of ICCAE 2010 is to provide a platform for researchers, engineers, academicians as well as industrial professionals from all over the world to present their research results and development activities in Computer and Automation Engineering. This conference provides opportunities for the delegates to exchange new ideas and application experiences face to face, to establish business or research relations and to find global partners for future collaboration.



Periodicals related to Business Strategy

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Engineering Management, IEEE Transactions on

Management of technical functions such as research, development, and engineering in industry, government, university, and other settings. Emphasis is on studies carried on within an organization to help in decision making or policy formation for RD&E.


Systems, Man, and Cybernetics, Part C: Applications and Reviews, IEEE Transactions on

Applications, review, and tutorial papers within the scope of the Systems, Man and Cybernetics Society. Currently, this covers: (1) Integration of the theories of communication, control cybernetics, stochastics, optimization and system structure towards the formulation of a general theory of systems; (2) Development of systems engineering technology including problem definition methods, modeling, and stimulation, methods of systems experimentation, human factors ...




Xplore Articles related to Business Strategy

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A Framework to the Assessment and Promotion of Knowledge Management Maturity Level in Enterprise: Modeling and Case Study

Isaai Mohammad Taghi; Amin Moghaddam Ali 2006 IEEE International Conference on Management of Innovation and Technology, 2006

Systematic management of enterprise knowledge, e.g. new ideas, innovations and patents, has a great impact on business sustainability and growth. Without comprehensive assessment of knowledge assets, agile companies can not design and run knowledge promotion programs required for survival in competitive environments in modern economy. A comprehensive framework for the assessment of as-is situation and development of knowledge promotion plans ...


Toward a Contingency Approach: Tailoring Project Management to Achieve a Competitive Advantage

Sabin Srivannaboon 2006 Technology Management for the Global Future - PICMET 2006 Conference, 2006

This study addresses the ways projects are managed as influenced by the business strategy in form of a theoretical framework. In particular, examples of how market leader companies tailored their project management - project strategy, organization, process, tools, metrics, and culture - to achieve a competitive advantage is presented. Additionally, general guidelines of how to tailor project management are provided. ...


Empirical Research on the Strategic Alignment in SMEs

Zhang Hong-bin 2007 International Conference on Management Science and Engineering, 2007

IT plays a strategic role in modern organizations, and IT strategy works as a guideline for IT investment, IT project selection and implementation, IT management and IT service. The alignment of business strategy and IT strategy is even more important than IT strategy itself. This study measured business strategy, IT strategy, strategic alignment, IT performance, and business performance. Analysis of ...


Operations systems: A perspective

Dan Stanzione AT&T Technical Journal, 1994

The U.S. communications industry today is experiencing great change. Telecommunications companies are vying with -- and in some cases merging with or acquiring -- cable television companies to bring interactive broadband services into the home. Computer companies are developing products to provide video-conferencing and other interactive broadband capabilities. In Washington, lawmakers are grappling with such issues as the "Information Highway," ...


Investigating critical factors of social CRM adoption using technology, organization, and environment (TOE) framework and analytical hierarchy process (AHP)

Dinna Amelina; Achmad Nizar Hidayanto; Nur Fitriah Ayuning Budi; Puspa I. Sandhyaduhita; Rifki Shihab 2016 International Conference on Advanced Computer Science and Information Systems (ICACSIS), 2016

Over the past three years, we have tracked the rising adoption of Web 2.0 technologies, both for individual and organizational. Enterprises believe Web 2.0 will provide new ways for interacting with their consumers, which is more convenient, easier, and cheaper. Social CRM becomes new concept and strategy for enterprises in utilizing Web 2.0 technologies to interact with and listen to ...


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Educational Resources on Business Strategy

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eLearning

Design for material logistics

AT&T Technical Journal, 1990

A key business strategy for Definity® system private-branch exchanges (PBXs) is offering the customer the ability to customize a system to match his or her needs. This is possible because the Definity PBX architecture allows design of an almost limitless number of customer end item configurations from a limited set of buildable options (e.g., circuit packs). Though this customization is ...


The praxis of systems thinking for concurrent design space and business strategy exploration

Global Humanitarian Technology Conference (GHTC), 2013 IEEE, 2013

Systems thinking is a holistic approach to solving complex problems by considering every issue as part of a complex web of interconnected and interacting systems rather than independent issues with unrelated consequences. Such an approach forces attention on the bigger picture and wider processes of change rather than concentrating on discrete outputs at the individual task level. Systems thinking can ...


Technology's role in our changing industry [electricity supply industry]

Power Engineering Review, IEEE, 1998

This article outlines American Electric Power's (AEP) perspective of the future utility company and the main competitive forces impacting that future, as well as AEP's business strategy. It also emphasizes the importance of technology in shaping that future for the energy delivery business. Electricity is a growth industry, both in absolute usage as well as in percentage of total energy ...


Staying competitive by managing organisational knowledge

Engineering Management Journal, 2006

With the advent of rapidly changing business environments, managers realize the need to develop an effective knowledge strategy and provide employees with the best available knowledge to support the decision-making process. New systems are required that not only locate, capture, store, share and leverage data and information but also knowledge. Sucessful knowledge strategies depend on whether organizations can link their ...


Applying CMMI and Strategy to ATE Development

Instrumentation & Measurement Magazine, IEEE, 2007

Focusing on the unique perspectives of "test" provides insights that may be lost in the details of the other disciplines. It is not a breakthrough in technology or the invention of new testing techniques that will make the difference for most organizations, instead it will be "seeing the forest through the trees" that will provide the needed insights for improvements. ...


More eLearning Resources

IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Contributors and Affiliations

    The revolution in information technology transforms not only information and its uses but, more important, knowledge and the ways we generate and manage it. Knowledge is now seen as input, output, and capital, even if imperfectly accounted for or understood. Many businesses and public agencies are convinced that knowledge can be managed in sophisticated, rational ways and that networking and information technology are essential tools for doing so. In this collection, experts from North America and Europe look at the transformation of knowledge in the global economy in light of the rapid changes in information technology, the resulting explosion of data, the recognition of intangibles as sources of value and liability, and the increasingly blurred distinction between private and public knowledge.The appeal of the Internet as boundary-spanning knowledge infrastructure, bridging all sectors of the economy, is shadowed by another infrastructure of rights- based contracts, practices, and institutions. The contributors address the ways in which the processes for creating and organizing knowledge interact with information technology, business strategy, and changing social and economic conditions. They discuss the balkanization that results from the complexity of the knowledge economy, the variety of knowledge resources, the great diversity of institutional and market contexts, and competing models of control and cooperation--and of proprietary and non-proprietary knowledge.Contributors:Berglind ï¿¿ï¿¿sgeirsdï¿¿ï¿¿ttir, Carliss Y. Baldwin, Kim B. Clark, Iain M. Cockburn, Patrick Cohendet, Robin Cowan, Paul A. David, Jan Fagerberg, Brian Fitzgerald, Dominque Foray, Peter A. Freeman, Fred Gault, Dietmar Harhoff, Margaret Hedstrom, C. Suzanne Iacono, Brian Kahin, John Leslie King, Kurt Larsen, Josh Lerner, Bengt-ï¿¿ï¿¿ke Lundvall, David C. Mowery, Arti K. Rai, Bhaven Sampat, Martin Schaaper, Tom Schuller, W. Edward Steinmueller, Stefan Thomke, Jean Tirole, Reinhilde Veugelers, Stï¿¿ï¿¿phan Vincent-Lancrin, Eric von Hippel, Andrew Wyckoff

  • Measuring Knowledge

    The revolution in information technology transforms not only information and its uses but, more important, knowledge and the ways we generate and manage it. Knowledge is now seen as input, output, and capital, even if imperfectly accounted for or understood. Many businesses and public agencies are convinced that knowledge can be managed in sophisticated, rational ways and that networking and information technology are essential tools for doing so. In this collection, experts from North America and Europe look at the transformation of knowledge in the global economy in light of the rapid changes in information technology, the resulting explosion of data, the recognition of intangibles as sources of value and liability, and the increasingly blurred distinction between private and public knowledge.The appeal of the Internet as boundary-spanning knowledge infrastructure, bridging all sectors of the economy, is shadowed by another infrastructure of rights- based contracts, practices, and institutions. The contributors address the ways in which the processes for creating and organizing knowledge interact with information technology, business strategy, and changing social and economic conditions. They discuss the balkanization that results from the complexity of the knowledge economy, the variety of knowledge resources, the great diversity of institutional and market contexts, and competing models of control and cooperation--and of proprietary and non-proprietary knowledge.Contributors:Berglind ï¿¿ï¿¿sgeirsdï¿¿ï¿¿ttir, Carliss Y. Baldwin, Kim B. Clark, Iain M. Cockburn, Patrick Cohendet, Robin Cowan, Paul A. David, Jan Fagerberg, Brian Fitzgerald, Dominque Foray, Peter A. Freeman, Fred Gault, Dietmar Harhoff, Margaret Hedstrom, C. Suzanne Iacono, Brian Kahin, John Leslie King, Kurt Larsen, Josh Lerner, Bengt-ï¿¿ï¿¿ke Lundvall, David C. Mowery, Arti K. Rai, Bhaven Sampat, Martin Schaaper, Tom Schuller, W. Edward Steinmueller, Stefan Thomke, Jean Tirole, Reinhilde Veugelers, Stï¿¿ï¿¿phan Vincent-Lancrin, Eric von Hippel, Andrew Wyckoff

  • Index

    The revolution in information technology transforms not only information and its uses but, more important, knowledge and the ways we generate and manage it. Knowledge is now seen as input, output, and capital, even if imperfectly accounted for or understood. Many businesses and public agencies are convinced that knowledge can be managed in sophisticated, rational ways and that networking and information technology are essential tools for doing so. In this collection, experts from North America and Europe look at the transformation of knowledge in the global economy in light of the rapid changes in information technology, the resulting explosion of data, the recognition of intangibles as sources of value and liability, and the increasingly blurred distinction between private and public knowledge.The appeal of the Internet as boundary-spanning knowledge infrastructure, bridging all sectors of the economy, is shadowed by another infrastructure of rights- based contracts, practices, and institutions. The contributors address the ways in which the processes for creating and organizing knowledge interact with information technology, business strategy, and changing social and economic conditions. They discuss the balkanization that results from the complexity of the knowledge economy, the variety of knowledge resources, the great diversity of institutional and market contexts, and competing models of control and cooperation--and of proprietary and non-proprietary knowledge.Contributors:Berglind ï¿¿ï¿¿sgeirsdï¿¿ï¿¿ttir, Carliss Y. Baldwin, Kim B. Clark, Iain M. Cockburn, Patrick Cohendet, Robin Cowan, Paul A. David, Jan Fagerberg, Brian Fitzgerald, Dominque Foray, Peter A. Freeman, Fred Gault, Dietmar Harhoff, Margaret Hedstrom, C. Suzanne Iacono, Brian Kahin, John Leslie King, Kurt Larsen, Josh Lerner, Bengt-ï¿¿ï¿¿ke Lundvall, David C. Mowery, Arti K. Rai, Bhaven Sampat, Martin Schaaper, Tom Schuller, W. Edward Steinmueller, Stefan Thomke, Jean Tirole, Reinhilde Veugelers, Stï¿¿ï¿¿phan Vincent-Lancrin, Eric von Hippel, Andrew Wyckoff

  • Index

    Bridging the gap between information security and strategic planningThis publication is a reflection of the author's firsthand experience as an information security consultant, working for an array of clients in the private and public sectors. Readers discover how to work with their organizations to develop and implement a successful information security plan by improving management practices and by establishing information security as an integral part of overall strategic planning.The book starts with an overview of basic concepts in strategic planning, information technology strategy, and information security strategy. A practical guide to defining an information security strategy is then provided, covering the "nuts and bolts" of defining long-term information security goals that effectively protect information resources. Separate chapters covering technology strategy and management strategy clearly demonstrate that both are essential, complementary elements in protecting information.Following this practical introduction to strategy development, subsequent chapters cover the theoretical foundation of an information security strategy, including: Examination of key enterprise planning models that correspond to different uses of information and different strategies for securing information Review of information economics, an essential link between information security strategy and business strategy Role of risk in building an information security strategyTwo separate case studies are developed, helping readers understand how the development and implementation of information security strategies can work within their own organizations.This is essential reading for information security managers, information technology executives, and consultants. By linking in formation security to general management strategy, the publication is also recommended for nontechnical executives who need to protect the value and security of their organization's information.

  • The Transitional Period, 2012–2015

    Internet trolls live to upset as many people as possible, using all the technical and psychological tools at their disposal. They gleefully whip the media into a frenzy over a fake teen drug crisis; they post offensive messages on Facebook memorial pages, traumatizing grief-stricken friends and family; they use unabashedly racist language and images. They take pleasure in ruining a complete stranger's day and find amusement in their victim's anguish. In short, trolling is the obstacle to a kinder, gentler Internet. To quote a famous Internet meme, trolling is why we can't have nice things online. Or at least that's what we have been led to believe. In this provocative book, Whitney Phillips argues that trolling, widely condemned as obscene and deviant, actually fits comfortably within the contemporary media landscape. Trolling may be obscene, but, Phillips argues, it isn't all that deviant. Trolls' actions are born of and fueled by culturally sanctioned impulses -- which are ust as damaging as the trolls' most disruptive behaviors. Phillips describes, for example, the relationship between trolling and sensationalist corporate media -- pointing out that for trolls, exploitation is a leisure activity; for media, it's a business strategy. She shows how trolls, "the grimacing poster children for a socially networked world," align with social media. And she documents how trolls, in addition to parroting media tropes, also offer a grotesque pantomime of dominant cultural tropes, including gendered notions of dominance and success and an ideology of entitlement. We don't just have a trolling problem, Phillips argues; we have a culture problem. _This Is Why We Can't Have Nice Things _isn't only about trolls; it's about a culture in which trolls thrive.

  • DaaS Strategy and Reference Architecture

    This chapter explains the significance of formally creating an enterprise data strategy in an organization while formulating a long-term roadmap to deliver Data as a Service (DaaS). Critical success factors (CSF) play a key role in linking data strategy to the underlying business strategy driving an organization. The chapter presents a reference architecture for the DaaS framework that provides details on the various components required for publishing data services. Having a high-level, functional understanding of the various reference architecture-related components and patterns is crucial for implementing a successful DaaS program in any organization. The reference architecture should be particularly beneficial to readers in terms of explaining foundational aspects of DaaS because it is independent of specific standards, technologies, implementations, or other concrete details. The chapter provides a brief overview of the DaaS reference architecture's components at a logical level.

  • Index

    Internet trolls live to upset as many people as possible, using all the technical and psychological tools at their disposal. They gleefully whip the media into a frenzy over a fake teen drug crisis; they post offensive messages on Facebook memorial pages, traumatizing grief-stricken friends and family; they use unabashedly racist language and images. They take pleasure in ruining a complete stranger's day and find amusement in their victim's anguish. In short, trolling is the obstacle to a kinder, gentler Internet. To quote a famous Internet meme, trolling is why we can't have nice things online. Or at least that's what we have been led to believe. In this provocative book, Whitney Phillips argues that trolling, widely condemned as obscene and deviant, actually fits comfortably within the contemporary media landscape. Trolling may be obscene, but, Phillips argues, it isn't all that deviant. Trolls' actions are born of and fueled by culturally sanctioned impulses -- which are ust as damaging as the trolls' most disruptive behaviors. Phillips describes, for example, the relationship between trolling and sensationalist corporate media -- pointing out that for trolls, exploitation is a leisure activity; for media, it's a business strategy. She shows how trolls, "the grimacing poster children for a socially networked world," align with social media. And she documents how trolls, in addition to parroting media tropes, also offer a grotesque pantomime of dominant cultural tropes, including gendered notions of dominance and success and an ideology of entitlement. We don't just have a trolling problem, Phillips argues; we have a culture problem. _This Is Why We Can't Have Nice Things _isn't only about trolls; it's about a culture in which trolls thrive.

  • The Changing Role of Institutions

    The revolution in information technology transforms not only information and its uses but, more important, knowledge and the ways we generate and manage it. Knowledge is now seen as input, output, and capital, even if imperfectly accounted for or understood. Many businesses and public agencies are convinced that knowledge can be managed in sophisticated, rational ways and that networking and information technology are essential tools for doing so. In this collection, experts from North America and Europe look at the transformation of knowledge in the global economy in light of the rapid changes in information technology, the resulting explosion of data, the recognition of intangibles as sources of value and liability, and the increasingly blurred distinction between private and public knowledge.The appeal of the Internet as boundary-spanning knowledge infrastructure, bridging all sectors of the economy, is shadowed by another infrastructure of rights- based contracts, practices, and institutions. The contributors address the ways in which the processes for creating and organizing knowledge interact with information technology, business strategy, and changing social and economic conditions. They discuss the balkanization that results from the complexity of the knowledge economy, the variety of knowledge resources, the great diversity of institutional and market contexts, and competing models of control and cooperation--and of proprietary and non-proprietary knowledge.Contributors:Berglind ï¿¿ï¿¿sgeirsdï¿¿ï¿¿ttir, Carliss Y. Baldwin, Kim B. Clark, Iain M. Cockburn, Patrick Cohendet, Robin Cowan, Paul A. David, Jan Fagerberg, Brian Fitzgerald, Dominque Foray, Peter A. Freeman, Fred Gault, Dietmar Harhoff, Margaret Hedstrom, C. Suzanne Iacono, Brian Kahin, John Leslie King, Kurt Larsen, Josh Lerner, Bengt-ï¿¿ï¿¿ke Lundvall, David C. Mowery, Arti K. Rai, Bhaven Sampat, Martin Schaaper, Tom Schuller, W. Edward Steinmueller, Stefan Thomke, Jean Tirole, Reinhilde Veugelers, Stï¿¿ï¿¿phan Vincent-Lancrin, Eric von Hippel, Andrew Wyckoff

  • Notes and References

    Bridging the gap between information security and strategic planningThis publication is a reflection of the author's firsthand experience as an information security consultant, working for an array of clients in the private and public sectors. Readers discover how to work with their organizations to develop and implement a successful information security plan by improving management practices and by establishing information security as an integral part of overall strategic planning.The book starts with an overview of basic concepts in strategic planning, information technology strategy, and information security strategy. A practical guide to defining an information security strategy is then provided, covering the "nuts and bolts" of defining long-term information security goals that effectively protect information resources. Separate chapters covering technology strategy and management strategy clearly demonstrate that both are essential, complementary elements in protecting information.Following this practical introduction to strategy development, subsequent chapters cover the theoretical foundation of an information security strategy, including: Examination of key enterprise planning models that correspond to different uses of information and different strategies for securing information Review of information economics, an essential link between information security strategy and business strategy Role of risk in building an information security strategyTwo separate case studies are developed, helping readers understand how the development and implementation of information security strategies can work within their own organizations.This is essential reading for information security managers, information technology executives, and consultants. By linking in formation security to general management strategy, the publication is also recommended for nontechnical executives who need to protect the value and security of their organization's information.

  • Knowledge Communities

    The revolution in information technology transforms not only information and its uses but, more important, knowledge and the ways we generate and manage it. Knowledge is now seen as input, output, and capital, even if imperfectly accounted for or understood. Many businesses and public agencies are convinced that knowledge can be managed in sophisticated, rational ways and that networking and information technology are essential tools for doing so. In this collection, experts from North America and Europe look at the transformation of knowledge in the global economy in light of the rapid changes in information technology, the resulting explosion of data, the recognition of intangibles as sources of value and liability, and the increasingly blurred distinction between private and public knowledge.The appeal of the Internet as boundary-spanning knowledge infrastructure, bridging all sectors of the economy, is shadowed by another infrastructure of rights- based contracts, practices, and institutions. The contributors address the ways in which the processes for creating and organizing knowledge interact with information technology, business strategy, and changing social and economic conditions. They discuss the balkanization that results from the complexity of the knowledge economy, the variety of knowledge resources, the great diversity of institutional and market contexts, and competing models of control and cooperation--and of proprietary and non-proprietary knowledge.Contributors:Berglind ï¿¿ï¿¿sgeirsdï¿¿ï¿¿ttir, Carliss Y. Baldwin, Kim B. Clark, Iain M. Cockburn, Patrick Cohendet, Robin Cowan, Paul A. David, Jan Fagerberg, Brian Fitzgerald, Dominque Foray, Peter A. Freeman, Fred Gault, Dietmar Harhoff, Margaret Hedstrom, C. Suzanne Iacono, Brian Kahin, John Leslie King, Kurt Larsen, Josh Lerner, Bengt-ï¿¿ï¿¿ke Lundvall, David C. Mowery, Arti K. Rai, Bhaven Sampat, Martin Schaaper, Tom Schuller, W. Edward Steinmueller, Stefan Thomke, Jean Tirole, Reinhilde Veugelers, Stï¿¿ï¿¿phan Vincent-Lancrin, Eric von Hippel, Andrew Wyckoff



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