Conferences related to Business Strategy

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2013 IEEE 15th Conference on Business Informatics (CBI)

The IEEE Conference on Business Informatics seeks for methodological approaches to describe, explain, predict, and design information and communication models, architectures, and systems for the business environment. A key characteristic of business informatics research is that it considers a real-world business context in developing new theories and concepts that enable new practical applications. Thereby, business informatics research does not only extend the body of knowledge of the information society, but at the same time provides a tangible impact to industry.

  • 2012 IEEE 14th International Conference on Commerce and Enterprise Computing (CEC)

    The IEEE International Conference on Commerce and Enterprise Computing (CEC) is the premier forum for researchers and practitioners to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, results, experiences and concerns in selected areas at the realm of the convergence between Business and Informatics. This convergence includes work in E-Commerce, Enterprise Computing, Technology-enabled Business Models and Transformation as well as specific Information Systems in Industries. The program of CEC 2012 will consist of invited talks, technical paper presentations, tutorials, industry sessions, workshops, and panel discussions representing both foundational contributions and applied research.

  • 2011 IEEE 13th Conference on Commerce and Enterprise Computing (CEC)

    The aim of the forum is to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, results, experiences and concerns in the field of E-Commerce technologies and Enterprise Computing, including Business Process Modeling and Management, Digital Ecosystems, Enterprise Architectures, Cloud Computing, and Green IT/Green Supply Chains.

  • 2010 IEEE 12th Conference on Commerce and Enterprise Computing (CEC)

    Commerce and Business System Architectures Electronic Commerce Technologies Business Process Management Business Intelligence Business Services Semantic Web and Ontological Engineering Mobile Business Applications Security and Trust Human Computer Interaction Cloud Computing Enterprise Green Computing and Energy Trading Software as a Service (SaaS)

  • 2009 IEEE Conference on Commerce and Enterprise Computing (CEC)

    The 11th IEEE Conference on Commerce and Enterprise Computing (CEC 09) results of a merger of the two annual flagship conferences of the IEEE Computer Society Technical Committee on E-Commerce: the IEEE Conference on E-Commerce Technology (CEC) and the IEEE Conference on Enterprise Computing, E-Commerce, and E-Services (EEE). Given its new title, the conference provides a platform for researchers and practitioners interested in theory and practice of technologies.

  • 2008 10th IEEE Conference on E-Commerce Technology and the 5th IEEE Conference on Enterprise Computing, E-Commerce and E-Services (CEC/EEE)

    This conference is a platform for researchers and practitioners interested in the theory and practice of E-Commerce and Enterprise Computing. We will focus on new technologies and methods that enable business processes to smoothly extend in a cross-enterprise environment

  • 2007 9th IEEE Conference on E-Commerce Technology & 4th IEEE Conference on Enterprise Computing, E-Commerce, & E-Services (CEC/EEE)

  • 2006 8th IEEE Conference on E-Commerce Technology & 3rd IEEE Conference on Enterprise Computing, E-Commerce, & E-Services (CEC/EEE)


2013 International Conference on Management Science and Engineering (ICMSE)

Management science and engineering, including operations research, organizational systems and behavior, economics and finance, and public administration.


2012 IEEE International Conference on Industrial Engineering and Engineering Management (IEEM)

All areas related to industrial engineering and engineering management.


2012 Portland International Conference on Management of Engineering & Technology (PICMET)

PICMET's focus is on bringing together the experts on technology management to address the issues involved in managing current and emerging technologies.


2011 3rd International Conference on Computer and Automation Engineering (ICCAE)

On the successful basis of ICCAE 2009 and ICCAE 2010, 2011 3rd International Conference on Computer and Automation Engineering (ICCAE 2011) will be held in Chongqing, China from January 21 - 23, 2010. ICCAE 2011 is co-sponsored by Singapore Institute of Electronics and University of Electronics Science and Technology of China (UESTC), and technical Co-sponsored by IEEE, IEEE Computational Intelligence Society, the Chongqing University, IACSIT, and Northeastern University of China.

  • 2010 The 2nd International Conference on Computer and Automation Engineering (ICCAE)

    The aim objective of ICCAE 2010 is to provide a platform for researchers, engineers, academicians as well as industrial professionals from all over the world to present their research results and development activities in Computer and Automation Engineering. This conference provides opportunities for the delegates to exchange new ideas and application experiences face to face, to establish business or research relations and to find global partners for future collaboration.



Periodicals related to Business Strategy

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Engineering Management, IEEE Transactions on

Management of technical functions such as research, development, and engineering in industry, government, university, and other settings. Emphasis is on studies carried on within an organization to help in decision making or policy formation for RD&E.


Systems, Man, and Cybernetics, Part C: Applications and Reviews, IEEE Transactions on

Applications, review, and tutorial papers within the scope of the Systems, Man and Cybernetics Society. Currently, this covers: (1) Integration of the theories of communication, control cybernetics, stochastics, optimization and system structure towards the formulation of a general theory of systems; (2) Development of systems engineering technology including problem definition methods, modeling, and stimulation, methods of systems experimentation, human factors ...



Most published Xplore authors for Business Strategy

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Xplore Articles related to Business Strategy

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A Case of Soft System Methodology (SSM): Interacting Aspect Modelling of Customer Satisfaction in Video Stream Service over Wireless and Mobile Network

Herman; Azizah Abd. Rahman; Yoanda Alim Syahbana 2011 UKSim 5th European Symposium on Computer Modeling and Simulation, 2011

Customer satisfaction has become essential in any service due to its positive influence to customer loyalty and further market opportunity. In video stream service over wireless and mobile network, customer satisfaction is determined by many interacting aspects. It includes objective Quality of Service (QoS) parameters and subjective Quality of user Experience (QoE) factors. In addition, customer satisfaction is also determined ...


Financial strategy and project controls

J. Phillpott IEE Colloquium on Public to Private: Business Strategy in a New Environment, 1991

First Page of the Article ![](/xploreAssets/images/absImages/00696973.png)


Industrial Automation System Integration Assessment of Large-Scale Steel Enterprises in China

Rui-yang Du; Qing Li; Jian Zhou; Ung Jo 2013 Fourth International Conference on Digital Manufacturing & Automation, 2013

The assessment of industrial automation system integration (IASI) is of great significance both to the administration and to the enterprise. This paper studies the current situation and development trend of IASI of Chinese large- scale steel enterprises. Locally weighted regression (LOESS) is adopted as a data analysis and visualization tool along with other conventional descriptive statistical methods. The results may ...


Book interview

Nick Smith Engineering & Technology, 2012

There are thousands of business books out there. But very few attempt to apply scientific structures to the way we organise out corporate thinking. andrea Kates's model - the 'business genome' approach - goes in search of answers, not through rehashing self-help paradigms, but by emulating ambitious 'big thinking' such as the human Genome Project. Talking with Kates, she says: ...


1.8 V Low-Transient-Energy Adaptive Program-Voltage Generator Based on Boost Converter for 3D-Integrated NAND Flash SSD

Koichi Ishida; Tadashi Yasufuku; Shinji Miyamoto; Hiroto Nakai; Makoto Takamiya; Takayasu Sakurai; Ken Takeuchi IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits, 2011

In this paper we present an adaptive program-voltage generator for 3D- integrated solid state drives (SSDs) based on a boost converter. The converter consists of a spiral inductor, a high-voltage MOS circuit, and an adaptive- frequency and duty-cycle (AFD) controller. The spiral inductor requires an area of only 5 × 5 mm2 in an interposer. The high-voltage MOS circuit employs ...


More Xplore Articles

Educational Resources on Business Strategy

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eLearning

A Case of Soft System Methodology (SSM): Interacting Aspect Modelling of Customer Satisfaction in Video Stream Service over Wireless and Mobile Network

Herman; Azizah Abd. Rahman; Yoanda Alim Syahbana 2011 UKSim 5th European Symposium on Computer Modeling and Simulation, 2011

Customer satisfaction has become essential in any service due to its positive influence to customer loyalty and further market opportunity. In video stream service over wireless and mobile network, customer satisfaction is determined by many interacting aspects. It includes objective Quality of Service (QoS) parameters and subjective Quality of user Experience (QoE) factors. In addition, customer satisfaction is also determined ...


Financial strategy and project controls

J. Phillpott IEE Colloquium on Public to Private: Business Strategy in a New Environment, 1991

First Page of the Article ![](/xploreAssets/images/absImages/00696973.png)


Industrial Automation System Integration Assessment of Large-Scale Steel Enterprises in China

Rui-yang Du; Qing Li; Jian Zhou; Ung Jo 2013 Fourth International Conference on Digital Manufacturing & Automation, 2013

The assessment of industrial automation system integration (IASI) is of great significance both to the administration and to the enterprise. This paper studies the current situation and development trend of IASI of Chinese large- scale steel enterprises. Locally weighted regression (LOESS) is adopted as a data analysis and visualization tool along with other conventional descriptive statistical methods. The results may ...


Book interview

Nick Smith Engineering & Technology, 2012

There are thousands of business books out there. But very few attempt to apply scientific structures to the way we organise out corporate thinking. andrea Kates's model - the 'business genome' approach - goes in search of answers, not through rehashing self-help paradigms, but by emulating ambitious 'big thinking' such as the human Genome Project. Talking with Kates, she says: ...


1.8 V Low-Transient-Energy Adaptive Program-Voltage Generator Based on Boost Converter for 3D-Integrated NAND Flash SSD

Koichi Ishida; Tadashi Yasufuku; Shinji Miyamoto; Hiroto Nakai; Makoto Takamiya; Takayasu Sakurai; Ken Takeuchi IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits, 2011

In this paper we present an adaptive program-voltage generator for 3D- integrated solid state drives (SSDs) based on a boost converter. The converter consists of a spiral inductor, a high-voltage MOS circuit, and an adaptive- frequency and duty-cycle (AFD) controller. The spiral inductor requires an area of only 5 × 5 mm2 in an interposer. The high-voltage MOS circuit employs ...


More eLearning Resources

IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Business and IT Strategy

    This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction Strategy and Systems of Management Business Strategy Models The Strategy of No Strategy IT Strategy So is IT really strategic? IT Strategy and Information Security Strategy Key Points

  • Emerging Infrastructure

    The revolution in information technology transforms not only information and its uses but, more important, knowledge and the ways we generate and manage it. Knowledge is now seen as input, output, and capital, even if imperfectly accounted for or understood. Many businesses and public agencies are convinced that knowledge can be managed in sophisticated, rational ways and that networking and information technology are essential tools for doing so. In this collection, experts from North America and Europe look at the transformation of knowledge in the global economy in light of the rapid changes in information technology, the resulting explosion of data, the recognition of intangibles as sources of value and liability, and the increasingly blurred distinction between private and public knowledge.The appeal of the Internet as boundary-spanning knowledge infrastructure, bridging all sectors of the economy, is shadowed by another infrastructure of rights- based contracts, practices, and institutions. The contributors address the ways in which the processes for creating and organizing knowledge interact with information technology, business strategy, and changing social and economic conditions. They discuss the balkanization that results from the complexity of the knowledge economy, the variety of knowledge resources, the great diversity of institutional and market contexts, and competing models of control and cooperation--and of proprietary and non-proprietary knowledge.Contributors:Berglind ï¿¿ï¿¿sgeirsdï¿¿ï¿¿ttir, Carliss Y. Baldwin, Kim B. Clark, Iain M. Cockburn, Patrick Cohendet, Robin Cowan, Paul A. David, Jan Fagerberg, Brian Fitzgerald, Dominque Foray, Peter A. Freeman, Fred Gault, Dietmar Harhoff, Margaret Hedstrom, C. Suzanne Iacono, Brian Kahin, John Leslie King, Kurt Larsen, Josh Lerner, Bengt-ï¿¿ï¿¿ke Lundvall, David C. Mowery, Arti K. Rai, Bhaven Sampat, Martin Schaaper, Tom Schuller, W. Edward Steinmueller, Stefan Thomke, Jean Tirole, Reinhilde Veugelers, Stï¿¿ï¿¿phan Vincent-Lancrin, Eric von Hippel, Andrew Wyckoff

  • Contributors and Affiliations

    The revolution in information technology transforms not only information and its uses but, more important, knowledge and the ways we generate and manage it. Knowledge is now seen as input, output, and capital, even if imperfectly accounted for or understood. Many businesses and public agencies are convinced that knowledge can be managed in sophisticated, rational ways and that networking and information technology are essential tools for doing so. In this collection, experts from North America and Europe look at the transformation of knowledge in the global economy in light of the rapid changes in information technology, the resulting explosion of data, the recognition of intangibles as sources of value and liability, and the increasingly blurred distinction between private and public knowledge.The appeal of the Internet as boundary-spanning knowledge infrastructure, bridging all sectors of the economy, is shadowed by another infrastructure of rights- based contracts, practices, and institutions. The contributors address the ways in which the processes for creating and organizing knowledge interact with information technology, business strategy, and changing social and economic conditions. They discuss the balkanization that results from the complexity of the knowledge economy, the variety of knowledge resources, the great diversity of institutional and market contexts, and competing models of control and cooperation--and of proprietary and non-proprietary knowledge.Contributors:Berglind ï¿¿ï¿¿sgeirsdï¿¿ï¿¿ttir, Carliss Y. Baldwin, Kim B. Clark, Iain M. Cockburn, Patrick Cohendet, Robin Cowan, Paul A. David, Jan Fagerberg, Brian Fitzgerald, Dominque Foray, Peter A. Freeman, Fred Gault, Dietmar Harhoff, Margaret Hedstrom, C. Suzanne Iacono, Brian Kahin, John Leslie King, Kurt Larsen, Josh Lerner, Bengt-ï¿¿ï¿¿ke Lundvall, David C. Mowery, Arti K. Rai, Bhaven Sampat, Martin Schaaper, Tom Schuller, W. Edward Steinmueller, Stefan Thomke, Jean Tirole, Reinhilde Veugelers, Stï¿¿ï¿¿phan Vincent-Lancrin, Eric von Hippel, Andrew Wyckoff

  • The Transitional Period, 2012–2015

    Internet trolls live to upset as many people as possible, using all the technical and psychological tools at their disposal. They gleefully whip the media into a frenzy over a fake teen drug crisis; they post offensive messages on Facebook memorial pages, traumatizing grief-stricken friends and family; they use unabashedly racist language and images. They take pleasure in ruining a complete stranger's day and find amusement in their victim's anguish. In short, trolling is the obstacle to a kinder, gentler Internet. To quote a famous Internet meme, trolling is why we can't have nice things online. Or at least that's what we have been led to believe. In this provocative book, Whitney Phillips argues that trolling, widely condemned as obscene and deviant, actually fits comfortably within the contemporary media landscape. Trolling may be obscene, but, Phillips argues, it isn't all that deviant. Trolls' actions are born of and fueled by culturally sanctioned impulses -- which are ust as damaging as the trolls' most disruptive behaviors. Phillips describes, for example, the relationship between trolling and sensationalist corporate media -- pointing out that for trolls, exploitation is a leisure activity; for media, it's a business strategy. She shows how trolls, "the grimacing poster children for a socially networked world," align with social media. And she documents how trolls, in addition to parroting media tropes, also offer a grotesque pantomime of dominant cultural tropes, including gendered notions of dominance and success and an ideology of entitlement. We don't just have a trolling problem, Phillips argues; we have a culture problem. _This Is Why We Can't Have Nice Things _isn't only about trolls; it's about a culture in which trolls thrive.

  • Index

    Bridging the gap between information security and strategic planningThis publication is a reflection of the author's firsthand experience as an information security consultant, working for an array of clients in the private and public sectors. Readers discover how to work with their organizations to develop and implement a successful information security plan by improving management practices and by establishing information security as an integral part of overall strategic planning.The book starts with an overview of basic concepts in strategic planning, information technology strategy, and information security strategy. A practical guide to defining an information security strategy is then provided, covering the "nuts and bolts" of defining long-term information security goals that effectively protect information resources. Separate chapters covering technology strategy and management strategy clearly demonstrate that both are essential, complementary elements in protecting information.Following this practical introduction to strategy development, subsequent chapters cover the theoretical foundation of an information security strategy, including: Examination of key enterprise planning models that correspond to different uses of information and different strategies for securing information Review of information economics, an essential link between information security strategy and business strategy Role of risk in building an information security strategyTwo separate case studies are developed, helping readers understand how the development and implementation of information security strategies can work within their own organizations.This is essential reading for information security managers, information technology executives, and consultants. By linking in formation security to general management strategy, the publication is also recommended for nontechnical executives who need to protect the value and security of their organization's information.

  • DaaS Strategy and Reference Architecture

    This chapter explains the significance of formally creating an enterprise data strategy in an organization while formulating a long-term roadmap to deliver Data as a Service (DaaS). Critical success factors (CSF) play a key role in linking data strategy to the underlying business strategy driving an organization. The chapter presents a reference architecture for the DaaS framework that provides details on the various components required for publishing data services. Having a high-level, functional understanding of the various reference architecture-related components and patterns is crucial for implementing a successful DaaS program in any organization. The reference architecture should be particularly beneficial to readers in terms of explaining foundational aspects of DaaS because it is independent of specific standards, technologies, implementations, or other concrete details. The chapter provides a brief overview of the DaaS reference architecture's components at a logical level.

  • Measuring Knowledge

    The revolution in information technology transforms not only information and its uses but, more important, knowledge and the ways we generate and manage it. Knowledge is now seen as input, output, and capital, even if imperfectly accounted for or understood. Many businesses and public agencies are convinced that knowledge can be managed in sophisticated, rational ways and that networking and information technology are essential tools for doing so. In this collection, experts from North America and Europe look at the transformation of knowledge in the global economy in light of the rapid changes in information technology, the resulting explosion of data, the recognition of intangibles as sources of value and liability, and the increasingly blurred distinction between private and public knowledge.The appeal of the Internet as boundary-spanning knowledge infrastructure, bridging all sectors of the economy, is shadowed by another infrastructure of rights- based contracts, practices, and institutions. The contributors address the ways in which the processes for creating and organizing knowledge interact with information technology, business strategy, and changing social and economic conditions. They discuss the balkanization that results from the complexity of the knowledge economy, the variety of knowledge resources, the great diversity of institutional and market contexts, and competing models of control and cooperation--and of proprietary and non-proprietary knowledge.Contributors:Berglind ï¿¿ï¿¿sgeirsdï¿¿ï¿¿ttir, Carliss Y. Baldwin, Kim B. Clark, Iain M. Cockburn, Patrick Cohendet, Robin Cowan, Paul A. David, Jan Fagerberg, Brian Fitzgerald, Dominque Foray, Peter A. Freeman, Fred Gault, Dietmar Harhoff, Margaret Hedstrom, C. Suzanne Iacono, Brian Kahin, John Leslie King, Kurt Larsen, Josh Lerner, Bengt-ï¿¿ï¿¿ke Lundvall, David C. Mowery, Arti K. Rai, Bhaven Sampat, Martin Schaaper, Tom Schuller, W. Edward Steinmueller, Stefan Thomke, Jean Tirole, Reinhilde Veugelers, Stï¿¿ï¿¿phan Vincent-Lancrin, Eric von Hippel, Andrew Wyckoff

  • Index

    The revolution in information technology transforms not only information and its uses but, more important, knowledge and the ways we generate and manage it. Knowledge is now seen as input, output, and capital, even if imperfectly accounted for or understood. Many businesses and public agencies are convinced that knowledge can be managed in sophisticated, rational ways and that networking and information technology are essential tools for doing so. In this collection, experts from North America and Europe look at the transformation of knowledge in the global economy in light of the rapid changes in information technology, the resulting explosion of data, the recognition of intangibles as sources of value and liability, and the increasingly blurred distinction between private and public knowledge.The appeal of the Internet as boundary-spanning knowledge infrastructure, bridging all sectors of the economy, is shadowed by another infrastructure of rights- based contracts, practices, and institutions. The contributors address the ways in which the processes for creating and organizing knowledge interact with information technology, business strategy, and changing social and economic conditions. They discuss the balkanization that results from the complexity of the knowledge economy, the variety of knowledge resources, the great diversity of institutional and market contexts, and competing models of control and cooperation--and of proprietary and non-proprietary knowledge.Contributors:Berglind ï¿¿ï¿¿sgeirsdï¿¿ï¿¿ttir, Carliss Y. Baldwin, Kim B. Clark, Iain M. Cockburn, Patrick Cohendet, Robin Cowan, Paul A. David, Jan Fagerberg, Brian Fitzgerald, Dominque Foray, Peter A. Freeman, Fred Gault, Dietmar Harhoff, Margaret Hedstrom, C. Suzanne Iacono, Brian Kahin, John Leslie King, Kurt Larsen, Josh Lerner, Bengt-ï¿¿ï¿¿ke Lundvall, David C. Mowery, Arti K. Rai, Bhaven Sampat, Martin Schaaper, Tom Schuller, W. Edward Steinmueller, Stefan Thomke, Jean Tirole, Reinhilde Veugelers, Stï¿¿ï¿¿phan Vincent-Lancrin, Eric von Hippel, Andrew Wyckoff

  • Knowledge and Place

    The revolution in information technology transforms not only information and its uses but, more important, knowledge and the ways we generate and manage it. Knowledge is now seen as input, output, and capital, even if imperfectly accounted for or understood. Many businesses and public agencies are convinced that knowledge can be managed in sophisticated, rational ways and that networking and information technology are essential tools for doing so. In this collection, experts from North America and Europe look at the transformation of knowledge in the global economy in light of the rapid changes in information technology, the resulting explosion of data, the recognition of intangibles as sources of value and liability, and the increasingly blurred distinction between private and public knowledge.The appeal of the Internet as boundary-spanning knowledge infrastructure, bridging all sectors of the economy, is shadowed by another infrastructure of rights- based contracts, practices, and institutions. The contributors address the ways in which the processes for creating and organizing knowledge interact with information technology, business strategy, and changing social and economic conditions. They discuss the balkanization that results from the complexity of the knowledge economy, the variety of knowledge resources, the great diversity of institutional and market contexts, and competing models of control and cooperation--and of proprietary and non-proprietary knowledge.Contributors:Berglind ï¿¿ï¿¿sgeirsdï¿¿ï¿¿ttir, Carliss Y. Baldwin, Kim B. Clark, Iain M. Cockburn, Patrick Cohendet, Robin Cowan, Paul A. David, Jan Fagerberg, Brian Fitzgerald, Dominque Foray, Peter A. Freeman, Fred Gault, Dietmar Harhoff, Margaret Hedstrom, C. Suzanne Iacono, Brian Kahin, John Leslie King, Kurt Larsen, Josh Lerner, Bengt-ï¿¿ï¿¿ke Lundvall, David C. Mowery, Arti K. Rai, Bhaven Sampat, Martin Schaaper, Tom Schuller, W. Edward Steinmueller, Stefan Thomke, Jean Tirole, Reinhilde Veugelers, Stï¿¿ï¿¿phan Vincent-Lancrin, Eric von Hippel, Andrew Wyckoff

  • Subcultural Origins, 2003–2007

    Internet trolls live to upset as many people as possible, using all the technical and psychological tools at their disposal. They gleefully whip the media into a frenzy over a fake teen drug crisis; they post offensive messages on Facebook memorial pages, traumatizing grief-stricken friends and family; they use unabashedly racist language and images. They take pleasure in ruining a complete stranger's day and find amusement in their victim's anguish. In short, trolling is the obstacle to a kinder, gentler Internet. To quote a famous Internet meme, trolling is why we can't have nice things online. Or at least that's what we have been led to believe. In this provocative book, Whitney Phillips argues that trolling, widely condemned as obscene and deviant, actually fits comfortably within the contemporary media landscape. Trolling may be obscene, but, Phillips argues, it isn't all that deviant. Trolls' actions are born of and fueled by culturally sanctioned impulses -- which are ust as damaging as the trolls' most disruptive behaviors. Phillips describes, for example, the relationship between trolling and sensationalist corporate media -- pointing out that for trolls, exploitation is a leisure activity; for media, it's a business strategy. She shows how trolls, "the grimacing poster children for a socially networked world," align with social media. And she documents how trolls, in addition to parroting media tropes, also offer a grotesque pantomime of dominant cultural tropes, including gendered notions of dominance and success and an ideology of entitlement. We don't just have a trolling problem, Phillips argues; we have a culture problem. _This Is Why We Can't Have Nice Things _isn't only about trolls; it's about a culture in which trolls thrive.



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