Conferences related to Robots

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2020 IEEE 16th International Workshop on Advanced Motion Control (AMC)

AMC2020 is the 16th in a series of biennial international workshops on Advanced Motion Control which aims to bring together researchers from both academia and industry and to promote omnipresent motion control technologies and applications.


2020 IEEE/ASME International Conference on Advanced Intelligent Mechatronics (AIM)

The scope of the 2020 IEEE/ASME AIM includes the following topics: Actuators, Automotive Systems, Bioengineering, Data Storage Systems, Electronic Packaging, Fault Diagnosis, Human-Machine Interfaces, Industry Applications, Information Technology, Intelligent Systems, Machine Vision, Manufacturing, Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems, Micro/Nano Technology, Modeling and Design, System Identification and Adaptive Control, Motion Control, Vibration and Noise Control, Neural and Fuzzy Control, Opto-Electronic Systems, Optomechatronics, Prototyping, Real-Time and Hardware-in-the-Loop Simulation, Robotics, Sensors, System Integration, Transportation Systems, Smart Materials and Structures, Energy Harvesting and other frontier fields.


2019 14th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

HRI is a highly selective annual conference that showcases the very best research and thinking in human-robot interaction. HRI is inherently interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary, reflecting work from researchers in robotics, psychology, cognitive science, HCI, human factors, artificial intelligence, organizational behavior, anthropology, and many other fields.

  • 2018 13th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    HRI is a highly selective annual conference that showcases the very best research and thinking in human-robot interaction. HRI is inherently interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary, reflecting work from researchersin robotics, psychology, cognitive science, HCI, human factors, artificial intelligence, organizational behavior,anthropology, and many other fields.

  • 2017 12th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    The conference serves as the primary annual meeting for researchers in the field of human-robot interaction. The event will include a main papers track and additional sessions for posters, demos, and exhibits. Additionally, the conference program will include a full day of workshops and tutorials running in parallel.

  • 2016 11th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    This conference focuses on the interaction between humans and robots.

  • 2015 10th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    HRI is a single -track, highly selective annual conference that showcases the very bestresearch and thinking in human -robot interaction. HRI is inherently interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary,reflecting work from researchers in robotics, psychology, cognitive science, HCI, human factors, artificialintelligence, organizational behavior, anthropology, and many other fields.

  • 2014 9th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    HRI is a highly selective annual conference that showcases the very best research and thinking in human -robot interaction. HRI is inherently interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary, reflecting work from researchers in robotics, psychology, cognitive science, HCI, human factors, artificial intelligence, organizational behavior, anthropology, and many other fields.

  • 2013 8th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    HRI is a single -track, highly selective annual conference that showcases the very best research and thinking in human-robot interaction. HRI is inherently interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary, reflecting work from researchers in robotics, psychology, cognitive science, HCI, human factors, artificial intelligence, organizational behavior, anthropology, and many other fields.

  • 2012 7th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    HRI is a single-track, highly selective annual conference that showcases the very best research and thinking in human-robot interaction. HRI is inherently interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary, reflecting work from researchers in robotics, psychology, cognitive science, HCI, human factors, artificial intelligence, organizational behavior, anthropology, and many other fields.

  • 2011 6th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    Robot companions Lifelike robots Assistive (health & personal care) robotics Remote robots Mixed initiative interaction Multi-modal interaction Long-term interaction with robots Awareness and monitoring of humans Task allocation and coordination Autonomy and trust Robot-team learning User studies of HRI Experiments on HRI collaboration Ethnography and field studies HRI software architectures HRI foundations Metrics for teamwork HRI group dynamics.

  • 2010 5th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    TOPICS: Robot companions, Lifelike robots, Assistive (health & personal care) robotics, Remote robots, Mixed initiative interaction, Multi-modal interaction, Long-term interaction with robots, Awareness and monitoring of humans, Task allocation and coordination, Autonomy and trust, Robot-team learning, User studies of HRI, Experiments on HRI collaboration, Ethnography and field studies, HRI software architectures

  • 2009 4th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    * Robot companions * Lifelike robots * Assistive (health & personal care) robotics * Remote robots * Mixed initiative interaction * Multi-modal interaction * Long-term interaction with robots * Awareness and monitoring of humans * Task allocation and coordination * Autonomy and trust * Robot-team learning * User studies of HRI * Experiments on HRI collaboration * Ethnography and field studies * HRI software architectures

  • 2008 3rd ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    Robot companions Lifelike robots Assistive (health & personal care) robotics Remote robots Mixed initiative interaction Multi-modal interaction Long-term interaction with robots Awareness and monitoring of humans Task allocation and coordination Autonomy and trust Robot-team learning User studies of HRI Experiments on HRI collaboration Ethnography and field studies HRI software architectures HRI foundations Metrics for teamwork HRI group dynamics Individual vs. group HRI

  • 2007 2nd Annual Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)


2019 41st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine & Biology Society (EMBC)

The conference program will consist of plenary lectures, symposia, workshops andinvitedsessions of the latest significant findings and developments in all the major fields ofbiomedical engineering.Submitted papers will be peer reviewed. Accepted high quality paperswill be presented in oral and postersessions, will appear in the Conference Proceedings and willbe indexed in PubMed/MEDLINE & IEEE Xplore


2019 IEEE 15th International Conference on Automation Science and Engineering (CASE)

The conference is the primary forum for cross-industry and multidisciplinary research in automation. Its goal is to provide a broad coverage and dissemination of foundational research in automation among researchers, academics, and practitioners.


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Periodicals related to Robots

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Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine, IEEE

The IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine publishes articles concerned with the various aspects of systems for space, air, ocean, or ground environments.


Automatic Control, IEEE Transactions on

The theory, design and application of Control Systems. It shall encompass components, and the integration of these components, as are necessary for the construction of such systems. The word `systems' as used herein shall be interpreted to include physical, biological, organizational and other entities and combinations thereof, which can be represented through a mathematical symbolism. The Field of Interest: shall ...


Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Broad coverage of concepts and methods of the physical and engineering sciences applied in biology and medicine, ranging from formalized mathematical theory through experimental science and technological development to practical clinical applications.


Communications Magazine, IEEE

IEEE Communications Magazine was the number three most-cited journal in telecommunications and the number eighteen cited journal in electrical and electronics engineering in 2004, according to the annual Journal Citation Report (2004 edition) published by the Institute for Scientific Information. Read more at http://www.ieee.org/products/citations.html. This magazine covers all areas of communications such as lightwave telecommunications, high-speed data communications, personal communications ...


Control Systems Technology, IEEE Transactions on

Serves as a compendium for papers on the technological advances in control engineering and as an archival publication which will bridge the gap between theory and practice. Papers will highlight the latest knowledge, exploratory developments, and practical applications in all aspects of the technology needed to implement control systems from analysis and design through simulation and hardware.


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Xplore Articles related to Robots

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See, walk, and kick: Humanoid robots start to play soccer

[{u'author_order': 1, u'affiliation': u'Humanoid Robots Group, Computer Science Institute, University of Freiburg, Georges-K\xf6hler-Allee 52, 79110 Freiburg, Germany. Email: behnke@informatik.uni-freiburg.de', u'authorUrl': u'https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/author/37295987100', u'full_name': u'Sven Behnke', u'id': 37295987100}, {u'author_order': 2, u'affiliation': u'Humanoid Robots Group, Computer Science Institute, University of Freiburg, Georges-K\xf6hler-Allee 52, 79110 Freiburg, Germany. Email: schreibe@informatik.uni-freiburg.de', u'authorUrl': u'https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/author/37298914700', u'full_name': u'Michael Schreiber', u'id': 37298914700}, {u'author_order': 3, u'affiliation': u'Humanoid Robots Group, Computer Science Institute, University of Freiburg, Georges-K\xf6hler-Allee 52, 79110 Freiburg, Germany. Email: stueckle@informatik.uni-freiburg.de', u'authorUrl': u'https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/author/37295983800', u'full_name': u'Jorg Stuckler', u'id': 37295983800}, {u'author_order': 4, u'affiliation': u'Humanoid Robots Group, Computer Science Institute, University of Freiburg, Georges-K\xf6hler-Allee 52, 79110 Freiburg, Germany. Email: rrenner@informatik.uni-freiburg.de', u'authorUrl': u'https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/author/37301701500', u'full_name': u'Reimund Renner', u'id': 37301701500}, {u'author_order': 5, u'affiliation': u'Humanoid Robots Group, Computer Science Institute, University of Freiburg, Georges-K\xf6hler-Allee 52, 79110 Freiburg, Germany. Email: stradat@informatik.uni-freiburg.de', u'authorUrl': u'https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/author/37295984800', u'full_name': u'Hauke Strasdat', u'id': 37295984800}] 2006 6th IEEE-RAS International Conference on Humanoid Robots, 2006

Robotic soccer superseded chess as a challenge problem and benchmark for artificial intelligence research and poses many challenges for robotics. The international RoboCup championships grew to the most important robotic competition worldwide. This paper describes the mechanical and electrical design of the robots that we constructed for RoboCup 2006, which took place in Bremen, Germany. The paper also covers the ...


From ancient machines to intelligent robots — A technical evolution —

[{u'author_order': 1, u'affiliation': u'Intelligent Robots Lab, LRT 8 Bundeswehr University Muenchen, 85577 Neubiberg, Germany', u'authorUrl': u'https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/author/37275752700', u'full_name': u'Volker Graefe', u'id': 37275752700}, {u'author_order': 2, u'affiliation': u'Intelligent Robots Lab, LRT 8 Bundeswehr University Muenchen, 85577 Neubiberg, Germany', u'authorUrl': u'https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/author/37275751100', u'full_name': u'Rainer Bischoff', u'id': 37275751100}] 2009 9th International Conference on Electronic Measurement & Instruments, 2009

Since pre-historic times mankind has dreamt of machines that imitate organisms or even surpass humans in their abilities, and time and again ingenious craftsmen B and later engineers B have attempted to actually build such machines. Today's robots are the latest result of an ongoing technical evolution that has progressed over more than 2000 years. Many robots work in factories ...


FaceBots: Social robots utilizing FaceBook

[{u'author_order': 1, u'affiliation': u'Interactive Robots and Media Lab, CIT, Maqam Campus, UAE University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates', u'authorUrl': u'https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/author/37397372100', u'full_name': u'Nikolaos Mavridis', u'id': 37397372100}, {u'author_order': 2, u'affiliation': u'Interactive Robots and Media Lab, CIT, Maqam Campus, UAE University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates', u'authorUrl': u'https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/author/37402766400', u'full_name': u'Chandan Datta', u'id': 37402766400}, {u'author_order': 3, u'affiliation': u'Interactive Robots and Media Lab, CIT, Maqam Campus, UAE University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates', u'authorUrl': u'https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/author/37690473700', u'full_name': u'Shervin Emami', u'id': 37690473700}, {u'author_order': 4, u'affiliation': u'Heinz-Nixdorf Institute, University of Paderborn, Germany', u'authorUrl': u'https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/author/37688000400', u'full_name': u'Andry Tanoto', u'id': 37688000400}, {u'author_order': 5, u'affiliation': u'New York Institute of Technology, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates', u'authorUrl': u'https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/author/37332495900', u'full_name': u'Chiraz BenAbdelkader', u'id': 37332495900}, {u'author_order': 6, u'affiliation': u'Interactive Robots and Media Lab, CIT, Maqam Campus, UAE University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates', u'authorUrl': u'https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/author/37320686400', u'full_name': u'Tamer Rabie', u'id': 37320686400}] 2009 4th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI), 2009

Summary form only given. Although existing robotic systems are interesting to interact with in the short term, it has been shown that after some weeks of quasi-regular encounters, humans gradually lose their interest, and meaningful longer-term human-robot relationships are not established. An underlying hypothesis driving the proposed project is that such relationships can be significantly enhanced if the human and ...


A cognitive architecture for a humanoid robot: a first approach

[{u'author_order': 1, u'affiliation': u'Collaborative Res. Centre on Humanoid Robots - Learning & Cooperating Multimodal Robots, Karlsruhe Univ., Germany', u'authorUrl': u'https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/author/37550548900', u'full_name': u'C. Burghart', u'id': 37550548900}, {u'author_order': 2, u'affiliation': u'Collaborative Res. Centre on Humanoid Robots - Learning & Cooperating Multimodal Robots, Karlsruhe Univ., Germany', u'authorUrl': u'https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/author/37271890000', u'full_name': u'R. Mikut', u'id': 37271890000}, {u'author_order': 3, u'affiliation': u'Collaborative Res. Centre on Humanoid Robots - Learning & Cooperating Multimodal Robots, Karlsruhe Univ., Germany', u'authorUrl': u'https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/author/37269459200', u'full_name': u'R. Stiefelhagen', u'id': 37269459200}, {u'author_order': 4, u'affiliation': u'Collaborative Res. Centre on Humanoid Robots - Learning & Cooperating Multimodal Robots, Karlsruhe Univ., Germany', u'authorUrl': u'https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/author/37295529100', u'full_name': u'T. Asfour', u'id': 37295529100}, {u'author_order': 5, u'affiliation': u'Collaborative Res. Centre on Humanoid Robots - Learning & Cooperating Multimodal Robots, Karlsruhe Univ., Germany', u'authorUrl': u'https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/author/37425522400', u'full_name': u'H. Holzapfel', u'id': 37425522400}, {u'author_order': 6, u'affiliation': u'Collaborative Res. Centre on Humanoid Robots - Learning & Cooperating Multimodal Robots, Karlsruhe Univ., Germany', u'authorUrl': u'https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/author/37280168000', u'full_name': u'P. Steinhaus', u'id': 37280168000}, {u'author_order': 7, u'affiliation': u'Collaborative Res. Centre on Humanoid Robots - Learning & Cooperating Multimodal Robots, Karlsruhe Univ., Germany', u'authorUrl': u'https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/author/37280242100', u'full_name': u'R. Dillmann', u'id': 37280242100}] 5th IEEE-RAS International Conference on Humanoid Robots, 2005., 2005

Future life pictures humans having intelligent humanoid robotic systems taking part in their everyday life. Thus researchers strive to supply robots with an adequate artificial intelligence in order to achieve a natural and intuitive interaction between human being and robotic system. Within the German Humanoid Project we focus on learning and cooperating multimodal robotic systems. In this paper we present ...


FaceBots: Robots utilizing and publishing social information in Facebook

[{u'author_order': 1, u'affiliation': u'Interactive Robots and Media Lab, CIT, Maqam Campus, UAE University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates', u'authorUrl': u'https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/author/37397372100', u'full_name': u'Nikolaos Mavridis', u'id': 37397372100}, {u'author_order': 2, u'affiliation': u'Interactive Robots and Media Lab, CIT, Maqam Campus, UAE University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates', u'authorUrl': u'https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/author/37402766400', u'full_name': u'Chandan Datta', u'id': 37402766400}, {u'author_order': 3, u'affiliation': u'Interactive Robots and Media Lab, CIT, Maqam Campus, UAE University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates', u'authorUrl': u'https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/author/37690473700', u'full_name': u'Shervin Emami', u'id': 37690473700}, {u'author_order': 4, u'affiliation': u'Heinz-Nixdorf Institute, University of Paderborn, Germany', u'authorUrl': u'https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/author/37688000400', u'full_name': u'Andry Tanoto', u'id': 37688000400}, {u'author_order': 5, u'affiliation': u'New York Institute of Technology, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates', u'authorUrl': u'https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/author/37332495900', u'full_name': u'Chiraz BenAbdelkader', u'id': 37332495900}, {u'author_order': 6, u'affiliation': u'Interactive Robots and Media Lab, CIT, Maqam Campus, UAE University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates', u'authorUrl': u'https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/author/37320686400', u'full_name': u'Tamer Rabie', u'id': 37320686400}] 2009 4th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI), 2009

Our project aims at supporting the creation of sustainable and meaningful longer-term human-robot relationships through the creation of embodied robots with face recognition and natural language dialogue capabilities, which exploit and publish social information available on the web (Facebook). Our main underlying experimental hypothesis is that such relationships can be significantly enhanced if the human and the robot are gradually ...


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Educational Resources on Robots

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eLearning

No eLearning Articles are currently tagged "Robots"

IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Distributed Computing by Oblivious Mobile Robots

    The study of what can be computed by a team of autonomous mobile robots, originally started in robotics and AI, has become increasingly popular in theoretical computer science (especially in distributed computing), where it is now an integral part of the investigations on computability by mobile entities. The robots are identical computational entities located and able to move in a spatial universe; they operate without explicit communication and are usually unable to remember the past; they are extremely simple, with limited resources, and individually quite weak. However, collectively the robots are capable of performing complex tasks, and form a system with desirable fault-tolerant and self-stabilizing properties. The research has been concerned with the computational aspects of such systems. In particular, the focus has been on the minimal capabilities that the robots should have in order to solve a problem. This book focuses on the recent algorithmic results in the field of distributed computing by oblivious mobile robots (unable to remember the past). After introducing the computational model with its nuances, we focus on basic coordination problems: pattern formation, gathering, scattering, leader election, as well as on dynamic tasks such as flocking. For each of these problems, we provide a snapshot of the state of the art, reviewing the existing algorithmic results. In doing so, we outline solution techniques, and we analyze the impact of the different assumptions on the robots' computability power. Table of Contents: Introduction / Computational Models / Gathering and Convergence / Pattern Formation / Scatterings and Coverings / Flocking / Other Directions

  • Robots and Economics

    This chapter contains sections titled: Do Robots Take Human Workers' Jobs?, Will New Robots Displace More Jobs Than They Create?, The Big Picture

  • Designing Sociable Robots

    This chapter contains sections titled: Design Issues for Sociable Robots, Design Hints from Animals, Humans, and Infants, A Framework for the Synthetic Nervous System, Mechanics of the Synthetic Nervous System, Criteria for Evaluation, Summary

  • 4 S1 !S2: Although Robots Can Have Rights, Robots Should Not Have Rights

    In opposition to the previous approaches that derive an ought from an is (chapters 2 and 3), there are two other modalities that uphold (or at least seek to uphold) the is/ought distinction. In the first version, one affirms that robots can have rights but denies that this fact requires us to accord them social or moral standing. This is the argument that has been developed and defended by Joanna Bryson beginning with her provocatively titled essay “Robots Should Be Slaves” (2010). Bryson's argument goes like this: Robots are property. No matter how capable they are, appear to be, or may become; we are obligated not to be obligated by them. “It is,” Bryson (2016a, 6) argues, “unquestionably within our society's capacity to define robots and other AI as moral agents and patients. In fact, many authors (both philosophers and technologists) are currently working on this project. It may be technically possible to create AI that would meet contemporary requirements for agency or patiency. But even if it is possible, neither of these two statements makes it either necessary or desirable that we should do so.” In other words, it is entirely with in our power to define robots in such a way that they would have the rights of a moral or legal person, but we should not do so. Although this sounds pretty straight forward, there are complications with the argument that need to be addressed and taken into account.

  • 3 S1→S2: Robots Can Have Rights; Robots Should Have Rights

    The counterpoint to or flipside of the negative response derives affirmation of the second statement from affirmation of the first: Robots are able to have rights; therefore robots should have rights. This is also (and perhaps surprisingly so) a rather popular stance that has considerable traction in the literature. It typically proceeds from the recognition that a robot, although currently limited in capabilities and status, will (most likely), at some point in the not-too-distant future, achieve the necessary and sufficient conditions to be considered a moral subject—that is, someone who can have rights and not just a mere thing. When this occurs (and in these arguments it is more often a matter of “when” as opposed to “if”), we will be obligated to extend to the robot some level of moral consideration. As Hilary Putnam (1964, 678) describes it in what has become a seminal essay on the subject: “I have referred to this problem [specifically the difficulty of deciding whether robots possess consciousness or not] as the problem of the ‘civil rights of robots' because that is what it may become, and much faster than any of us now expect. Given the ever-accelerating rate of both technological and social change, it is entirely possible that robots will one day exist, and argue ‘we are alive; we are conscious!' In that event, what are today only philosophical prejudices of a traditional anthropocentric and mentalistic kind would all too likely develop into conservative political attitudes.”

  • Design of Dynamic Legged Robots

    Inspired by the remarkable locomotion capabilities illustrated by animals across land, sea and air, robotics engineers have strived for decades to achieve similar dynamic locomotion capabilities in legged machines. Learning from animals’ compliant structures and ways of utilizing them, engineers have developed numerous novel mechanisms that allow for more dynamic, more efficient legged systems. These newly emerging robotic systems possess distinguishing mechanical characteristics in contrast to manufacturing robots in factories and pave the way for a new era of mobile robots to serve our society. Realizing the full capabilities of these new legged robots is a multi-factorial research problem, requiring coordinated advances in design, control, perception, state estimation, navigation and other areas. Design of Dynamic Legged Robots focuses on the mechanical design of legged robots. It introduces the topic by looking at the history of legged robots, taking us up to the dynamic legged machines that are today pushing the boundaries of speed and performance through advances in materials, design, and control. It goes on to discuss some of the main challenges to actuator design in legged robots and discusses a recently developed technology called proprioceptive actuators in order to meet the needs of today’s legged machines. It proceeds to discuss philosophical perspectives on designing for energetic efficiency, a critical aspect of legged robot design. The penultimate chapter discusses trends in leg design and presents a case study using principles from observations in biology to design a leg for the MIT Cheetah robot, and concludes with a summary of future directions and applications.

  • Kinematic Models for Mobile Robots

    This chapter contains sections titled: * Introduction * Vehicles with Front-Wheel Steering * Vehicles with Differential-Drive Steering * Exercises * References

  • Cyber-Maritime Cycle: Autonomy of Marine Robots for Ocean Sensing

    Marine robots are being increasingly deployed in environmental sensing and ocean observation applications. The key challenges in mobile ocean sensing are to design and control the motion of the robots to collect Lagrangian data over a large spatial domain, and then convert these Lagrangian data streams into Eulerian spatial-temporal maps for scientific and operational benefits. This monograph introduces cyber maritime cycle as a collection of feedback loops where the flow of data is regulated by functional blocks of autonomy. As a new development, the split between the data-driven cycle and the geo-scientific modeling cycle allows the separation of data streams with different time and spatial scales. This separation allows the conversion between Lagrangian and Eulerian data representations to happen more frequently for navigation of marine robots. This monograph introduces the overall systems architecture and patterns for data streams that enables autonomy for marine robots towards environmental sensing applications. It is an ideal reference for researchers, students or practitioners already doing research in this field, or planning to do so.

  • Embodiment in Socially Interactive Robots

    Socially interactive robots provide entertainment, information, and/or assistance; this last category is typically encompassed by socially assistive robotics. In all cases, such robots can achieve their primary functions without performing functional physical work. This monograph reviews the existing work that explores the role of physical embodiment in socially interactive robots. This class consists of robots that are not only capable of engaging in social interaction with humans, but are using primarily their social capabilities to perform their desired functions. This monograph explores the embodiment hypothesis that physical embodiment has a measurable effect on performance and perception of social interactions in socially interactive robotics. It presents a thorough review of existing work and analyzes existing results and approaches to embodiment to determine the current state of the embodiment hypothesis. This monograph is a comprehensive and in depth overview of embodiment in socially interactive robots that is a starting point for researchers and students beginning their own research in the area.

  • A Survey of Nonverbal Signaling Methods for Non-Humanoid Robots

    This monograph surveys and informs the design and usage of nonverbal signals for human-robot interaction. With robots increasingly being utilized for tasks that require them to not only operate in close proximity to humans but to interact with them as well, there has been great interest in the communication challenges associated with the varying degrees of interaction in these environments. The success of such interactions depends on robots’ ability to convey information about their knowledge, intent, and actions to co-located humans. The monograph presents a comprehensive review of literature related to the generation and usage of nonverbal signals that facilitate legibility of non-humanoid robot state and behavior. To motivate the need for these signaling behaviors, it surveys literature in human communication and psychology and outlines target use cases of non-humanoid robots. Specifically, the focus is on works that provide insight into the cognitive processes that enable humans to recognize, interpret, and exploit nonverbal signals. From these use cases, information is identified that is potentially important for non-humanoid robots to signal and organize it into three categories of robot state. The monograph then presents a review of signal design techniques to illustrate how signals conveying this information can be generated and utilized. It concludes by discussing issues that must be considered during nonverbal signaling and open research areas, with a focus on informing the design and usage of generalizable nonverbal signaling behaviors for task- oriented non-humanoid robots.



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