Conferences related to Robots

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ICASSP 2017 - 2017 IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing (ICASSP)

The ICASSP meeting is the world's largest and most comprehensive technical conference focused on signal processing and its applications. The conference will feature world-class speakers, tutorials, exhibits, and over 50 lecture and poster sessions.

  • ICASSP 2015 - 2015 IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing (ICASSP)

    The ICASSP meeting is the world's largest and most comprehensive technical conference focused on signal processing and its applications. The conference will feature world-class speakers, tutorials, exhibits, and over 50 lecture and poster sessions.

  • ICASSP 2014 - 2014 IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing (ICASSP)

    ICASSP 2014 will be the world s largest and most comprehensive technical conference focused on the many facets of signal processing and its applications. The conference will feature world-class speakers, tutorials, exhibits, and oral/poster sessions on the most up-to-date topics in signal processing research.

  • ICASSP 2013 - 2013 IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing (ICASSP)

    The ICASSP meeting is the world's largest and most comprehensive technical conference focused on signal processing and its applications. The conference will feature world-class speakers, tutorials, exhibits, and over 50 lecture and poster sessions.

  • ICASSP 2012 - 2012 IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing

    The latest research results on both theories and applications on signal processing will be presented and discussed among participants from all over the world. Video/Speech Signal processing used in human interface between Robots and Personal users will be highlighted.


2014 5th IEEE RAS & EMBS International Conference on Biomedical Robotics and Biomechatronics (BioRob)

Theoretical and experimental challenges posed by the application of robotics and mechatronics in medicine and biology. Analysis of biological systems from a biomechatronic point of view. Design and fabrication of bio-inspired and biomimetic machines. Robotic and mechatronic devices and systems for prevention, diagnosis, surgery, prosthetics, rehabilitation and personal assistance.

  • 2012 4th IEEE RAS & EMBS International Conference on Biomedical Robotics and Biomechatronics (BioRob 2012)

    Theoretical and experimental challenges posed by the application of robotics and mechatronics in medicine and biology. Analysis of biological systems from biomechatronic point of view. Design and fabrication of bio-inspired machines. Robotic and mechatronic devices and systems for prevention, diagnosis, surgery, prosthetics, rehabilitation and personal assistance.

  • 2010 3rd IEEE RAS & EMBS International Conference on Biomedical Robotics and Biomechatronics (BioRob 2010)

    Theoretical and experimental challenges posed by the application of robotics and mechatronics in medicine and biology. Analysis of biological systems from a biomechatronic point of view. Design and fabrication of bio-inspired machines and systems for diagnosis, surgery, prosthetics, rehabilitation and personal assistance.

  • 2008 2nd IEEE RAS & EMBS International Conference on Biomedical Robotics and Biomechatronics (BioRob 2008)

    The main focus of Biorobotics is to analyze biological systems from a "biomechatronic" point of view, trying to understand the scientific and engineering principles underlying their extraordinary performance. This profound understanding of how biological systems work, behave and interact can be used for two main objectives: to guide the design and fabrication of novel, high performance bio-inspired machines and systems, for many different potential applications; and to develop (nano, micro, macro) novel dev

  • 2006 1st IEEE RAS & EMBS International Conference on Biomedical Robotics and Biomechatronics (BioRob 2006)


2014 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA)

Robotics and Automation


2014 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS 2014)

tbd


2013 13th IEEE-RAS International Conference on Humanoid Robots (Humanoids 2013)

Humanoids in the Real World: All related areas of humanoid robotics including locomotion, architectures, mechatronics, control, perception, planning, learning, neuroscience and interaction.


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Periodicals related to Robots

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Intelligent Systems, IEEE

IEEE Intelligent Systems, a bimonthly publication of the IEEE Computer Society, provides peer-reviewed, cutting-edge articles on the theory and applications of systems that perceive, reason, learn, and act intelligently. The editorial staff collaborates with authors to produce technically accurate, timely, useful, and readable articles as part of a consistent and consistently valuable editorial product. The magazine serves software engineers, systems ...


Proceedings of the IEEE

The most highly-cited general interest journal in electrical engineering and computer science, the Proceedings is the best way to stay informed on an exemplary range of topics. This journal also holds the distinction of having the longest useful archival life of any EE or computer related journal in the world! Since 1913, the Proceedings of the IEEE has been the ...


Robotics, IEEE Transactions on

Publishes fundamental papers on all aspects of Robotics, featuring interdisciplinary approaches from computer science, control systems, electrical engineering, mathematics, mechanical engineering, and other fields. Robots and intelligent machines and systems are critical in areas such as industrial applications; service and personal assistants; surgical operations; space, underwater, and remote exploration; entertainment; safety, search, and rescue; military applications; agriculture applications; and intelligent ...




Xplore Articles related to Robots

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Experimental study on pseudo-downsampled ILC with time shift along iteration axis

Bin Zhang; Danwei Wang; Yongqiang Ye; Yigang Wang; Keliang Zhou 2006 American Control Conference, 2006

A pseudo-downsampled iterative learning control (ILC) scheme with a time shift along iteration axis is proposed. In this scheme, there are two sampling rates: a system with a fast sampling rate and an ILC scheme with a downsampled slow sampling rate. After one cycle, the input update points of ILC are shifted one sampling period w.r.t. fast system sampling rate. ...


Humanoid social robots: A design for interaction

Carlos Antonio Acosta Calderon; Asadollah Norouzi; Zhang Qi Control Automation Robotics & Vision (ICARCV), 2014 13th International Conference on, 2014

This paper describes our latest humanoid social robots HR-1 and HR-2. The robots HR-1 and HR2 provide a mechanically sound platform, with on-board computer vision and other sensors. The robots have similar upper body structure, both with different locomotion system, HR-1 has a mobile platform and HR-2 is a biped robot. The paper also presents the control architecture and the ...


Inverse kinematics for a multifingered hand

T. Koehler; M. Donath Robotics and Automation, 1988. Proceedings., 1988 IEEE International Conference on, 1988

One aspects of the control of multifingered hands is discussed, nearly inverse kinematics. For a serial-link manipulator with a multifingered hand attached to its distal link, the inverse kinematics of the hand and of the manipulator can be treated separately. The inverse kinematic solution for a three- fingered, nine-degree-of-freedom hand is described. The solution presented for the general configuration of ...


Kinematic aspects of robotic biped locomotion systems

F. M. Silva; J. A. T. Machado Intelligent Robots and Systems, 1997. IROS '97., Proceedings of the 1997 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on, 1997

This paper presents the kinematic study of robotic biped locomotion systems. The main purpose is to determine the kinematic characteristics and the system performance during walking. For that objective, the prescribed motion of the biped is completely characterised in terms of five locomotion variables: step length, hip height, maximum hip ripple, maximum foot clearance and link lengths. In this work, ...


Modeling and analysis of dual-arm cluster tools for wafer fabrication with revisiting

Yan Qiao; NaiQi Wu; MengChu Zhou Automation Science and Engineering (CASE), 2011 IEEE Conference on, 2011

Some wafer fabrication processes are repeated processes, e.g. atomic layer deposition (ALD) process. For such processes, the wafers need to visit some processing modules for a number of times, which complicates the cycle time analysis. This paper studies the cycle time analysis problem for such processes. With a Petri net model, it is found that such processes contain local cycles ...


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Educational Resources on Robots

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eLearning

Experimental study on pseudo-downsampled ILC with time shift along iteration axis

Bin Zhang; Danwei Wang; Yongqiang Ye; Yigang Wang; Keliang Zhou 2006 American Control Conference, 2006

A pseudo-downsampled iterative learning control (ILC) scheme with a time shift along iteration axis is proposed. In this scheme, there are two sampling rates: a system with a fast sampling rate and an ILC scheme with a downsampled slow sampling rate. After one cycle, the input update points of ILC are shifted one sampling period w.r.t. fast system sampling rate. ...


Humanoid social robots: A design for interaction

Carlos Antonio Acosta Calderon; Asadollah Norouzi; Zhang Qi Control Automation Robotics & Vision (ICARCV), 2014 13th International Conference on, 2014

This paper describes our latest humanoid social robots HR-1 and HR-2. The robots HR-1 and HR2 provide a mechanically sound platform, with on-board computer vision and other sensors. The robots have similar upper body structure, both with different locomotion system, HR-1 has a mobile platform and HR-2 is a biped robot. The paper also presents the control architecture and the ...


Inverse kinematics for a multifingered hand

T. Koehler; M. Donath Robotics and Automation, 1988. Proceedings., 1988 IEEE International Conference on, 1988

One aspects of the control of multifingered hands is discussed, nearly inverse kinematics. For a serial-link manipulator with a multifingered hand attached to its distal link, the inverse kinematics of the hand and of the manipulator can be treated separately. The inverse kinematic solution for a three- fingered, nine-degree-of-freedom hand is described. The solution presented for the general configuration of ...


Kinematic aspects of robotic biped locomotion systems

F. M. Silva; J. A. T. Machado Intelligent Robots and Systems, 1997. IROS '97., Proceedings of the 1997 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on, 1997

This paper presents the kinematic study of robotic biped locomotion systems. The main purpose is to determine the kinematic characteristics and the system performance during walking. For that objective, the prescribed motion of the biped is completely characterised in terms of five locomotion variables: step length, hip height, maximum hip ripple, maximum foot clearance and link lengths. In this work, ...


Modeling and analysis of dual-arm cluster tools for wafer fabrication with revisiting

Yan Qiao; NaiQi Wu; MengChu Zhou Automation Science and Engineering (CASE), 2011 IEEE Conference on, 2011

Some wafer fabrication processes are repeated processes, e.g. atomic layer deposition (ALD) process. For such processes, the wafers need to visit some processing modules for a number of times, which complicates the cycle time analysis. This paper studies the cycle time analysis problem for such processes. With a Petri net model, it is found that such processes contain local cycles ...


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IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Improving the DAC Architecture by Using Proprioceptive Sensors

    Previous research has proposed the distributed adaptive control (DAC) architecture as a self-organizing controller for autonomous mobile robots. Despite its successes, practical experience has indicated several options for improvement. This paper proposes a new control architecture for mobile robots that can be seen as an extension of the DAC architecture. The control architecture consists of a controller and a value system. The controller uses the activity patterns of visual sensors to determine the motor commands, whereas the value system receives stimuli from proprioceptive sensors. This design decision is justified by the following arguments: (1) both components are significantly decoupled by using different sensory modalities; (2) the feedback of proprioceptive sensory patterns is omnipresent in biological systems and has been widely neglected in control systems; and (3) proprioceptive sensors operate more reliably and can be used more efficiently than visual sensors, such as pixels in CCD camera. Practical experiments with the Khepera robot show that by using proprioceptive sensors, the control architecture considerably better adapts to changing environments and that it yields very robust behavior with respect to sensor failures.

  • Which Robot Future? A Way Forward

    With robots, we are inventing a new species that is part material and part digital. The ambition of modern robotics goes beyond copying humans, beyond the effort to make walking, talking androids that are indistinguishable from people. Future robots will have superhuman abilities in both the physical and digital realms. They will be embedded in our physical spaces, with the ability to go where we cannot, and will have minds of their own, thanks to artificial intelligence. They will be fully connected to the digital world, far better at carrying out online tasks than we are. In Robot Futures, the roboticist Illah Reza Nourbakhsh considers how we will share our world with these creatures, and how our society could change as it incorporates a race of stronger, smarter beings. Nourbakhsh imagines a future that includes adbots offering interactive custom messaging; robotic flying toys that operate by means of "gaze tracking"; robot-enabled multimodal, multicontinental telepresence; and even a way that nanorobots could allow us to assume different physical forms. Nourbakhsh follows each glimpse into the robotic future with an examination of the underlying technology and an exploration of the social consequences of the scenario. Each chapter describes a form of technological empowerment -- in some cases, empowerment run amok, with corporations and institutions amassing even more power and influence and individuals becoming unconstrained by social accountability. (Imagine the hotheaded discourse of the Internet taking physical form.) Nourbakhsh also offers a counter-vision: a robotics designed to create civic and community empowerment. His book helps us understand why that is the robot future we should try to bring about.

  • Collective sorting and segregation in robots with minimal sensing

    Many ants sort their brood so that brood items at similar stages of development are grouped together, and separated from items at different stages of development. The only model proposed to date assumes that ants engaged in brood sorting can sense both the type of element they are carrying, and the local spatial density of that type of element; the model was demonstrated in simulation using two types of objects. This paper describes a system of simple homogeneous autonomous mobile robots which are able to segregate or sort two types of physically identical objects differing only in colour, yet can sense only the colour of the object they are carrying, and have no capacity for spatial orientation or memory. This shows that this sorting problem can be solved by agents simpler than was previously supposed possible.

  • Glossary

    With robots, we are inventing a new species that is part material and part digital. The ambition of modern robotics goes beyond copying humans, beyond the effort to make walking, talking androids that are indistinguishable from people. Future robots will have superhuman abilities in both the physical and digital realms. They will be embedded in our physical spaces, with the ability to go where we cannot, and will have minds of their own, thanks to artificial intelligence. They will be fully connected to the digital world, far better at carrying out online tasks than we are. In Robot Futures, the roboticist Illah Reza Nourbakhsh considers how we will share our world with these creatures, and how our society could change as it incorporates a race of stronger, smarter beings. Nourbakhsh imagines a future that includes adbots offering interactive custom messaging; robotic flying toys that operate by means of "gaze tracking"; robot-enabled multimodal, multicontinental telepresence; and even a way that nanorobots could allow us to assume different physical forms. Nourbakhsh follows each glimpse into the robotic future with an examination of the underlying technology and an exploration of the social consequences of the scenario. Each chapter describes a form of technological empowerment -- in some cases, empowerment run amok, with corporations and institutions amassing even more power and influence and individuals becoming unconstrained by social accountability. (Imagine the hotheaded discourse of the Internet taking physical form.) Nourbakhsh also offers a counter-vision: a robotics designed to create civic and community empowerment. His book helps us understand why that is the robot future we should try to bring about.

  • References

    With robots, we are inventing a new species that is part material and part digital. The ambition of modern robotics goes beyond copying humans, beyond the effort to make walking, talking androids that are indistinguishable from people. Future robots will have superhuman abilities in both the physical and digital realms. They will be embedded in our physical spaces, with the ability to go where we cannot, and will have minds of their own, thanks to artificial intelligence. They will be fully connected to the digital world, far better at carrying out online tasks than we are. In Robot Futures, the roboticist Illah Reza Nourbakhsh considers how we will share our world with these creatures, and how our society could change as it incorporates a race of stronger, smarter beings. Nourbakhsh imagines a future that includes adbots offering interactive custom messaging; robotic flying toys that operate by means of "gaze tracking"; robot-enabled multimodal, multicontinental telepresence; and even a way that nanorobots could allow us to assume different physical forms. Nourbakhsh follows each glimpse into the robotic future with an examination of the underlying technology and an exploration of the social consequences of the scenario. Each chapter describes a form of technological empowerment -- in some cases, empowerment run amok, with corporations and institutions amassing even more power and influence and individuals becoming unconstrained by social accountability. (Imagine the hotheaded discourse of the Internet taking physical form.) Nourbakhsh also offers a counter-vision: a robotics designed to create civic and community empowerment. His book helps us understand why that is the robot future we should try to bring about.

  • Multi-object Segregation: Ant-like Brood Sorting Using Minimalist Robots

    This study shows that a task as complicated as multiobject annular segregation can be accomplished by robots using a 'minimalist' solution employing a simple adaptive mechanism and minimal hardware. The success of the mechanism, which employs a combined leaky integrator, is demonstrated both in simulation and using real robots

  • Index

    With robots, we are inventing a new species that is part material and part digital. The ambition of modern robotics goes beyond copying humans, beyond the effort to make walking, talking androids that are indistinguishable from people. Future robots will have superhuman abilities in both the physical and digital realms. They will be embedded in our physical spaces, with the ability to go where we cannot, and will have minds of their own, thanks to artificial intelligence. They will be fully connected to the digital world, far better at carrying out online tasks than we are. In Robot Futures, the roboticist Illah Reza Nourbakhsh considers how we will share our world with these creatures, and how our society could change as it incorporates a race of stronger, smarter beings. Nourbakhsh imagines a future that includes adbots offering interactive custom messaging; robotic flying toys that operate by means of "gaze tracking"; robot-enabled multimodal, multicontinental telepresence; and even a way that nanorobots could allow us to assume different physical forms. Nourbakhsh follows each glimpse into the robotic future with an examination of the underlying technology and an exploration of the social consequences of the scenario. Each chapter describes a form of technological empowerment -- in some cases, empowerment run amok, with corporations and institutions amassing even more power and influence and individuals becoming unconstrained by social accountability. (Imagine the hotheaded discourse of the Internet taking physical form.) Nourbakhsh also offers a counter-vision: a robotics designed to create civic and community empowerment. His book helps us understand why that is the robot future we should try to bring about.

  • Index

    The Robotics Primer offers a broadly accessible introduction to robotics for students at pre-university and university levels, robot hobbyists, and anyone interested in this burgeoning field. The text takes the reader from the most basic concepts (including perception and movement) to the most novel and sophisticated applications and topics (humanoids, shape-shifting robots, space robotics), with an emphasis on what it takes to create autonomous intelligent robot behavior. The core concepts of robotics are carried through from fundamental definitions to more complex explanations, all presented in an engaging, conversational style that will appeal to readers of different backgrounds. The Robotics Primer covers such topics as the definition of robotics, the history of robotics ("Where do Robots Come From?"), robot components, locomotion, manipulation, sensors, control, control architectures, representation, behavior ("Making Your Robot Behave"), navigation, group robotics, learning, and the future of robotics (and its ethical implications). To encourage further engagement, experimentation, and course and lesson design, The Robotics Primer is accompanied by a free robot programming exercise workbook that implements many of the ideas on the book on iRobot platforms. The Robotics Primer is unique as a principled, pedagogical treatment of the topic that is accessible to a broad audience; the only prerequisites are curiosity and attention. It can be used effectively in an educational setting or more informally for self-instruction. The Robotics Primer is a springboard for readers of all backgrounds--including students taking robotics as an elective outside the major, graduate students preparing to specialize in robotics, and K-12 teachers who bring robotics into their classroo ms.Maja J Mataric [acute accent over c] is Professor of Computer Science and Neuroscience and Director of the Center for Robotics and Embedded Systems at the University of Southern California, where she is also Codirector of the Robotics Research Lab and Senior Associate Dean for research in the Viterbi School of Engineering.

  • Adaptation to Multiple Robots Organization with Organizational Knowledge on Formation

    This paper extends our organizational learning model by introducing the mechanism of utilizing organizational knowledge to improve the collective performance, and focuses on how this organizational knowledge works for supporting new robots in the process of their adaptation to an organization of multiple robots. Through intensive simulations of truss construction by multiple robots, the following experimental results have suggested: (1) Robots with organizational knowledge complete given tasks in fewer iterations than those without organizational knowledge; (2) The steps with organizational knowledge become fewer as the number of robots increases; and (3) Organizational knowledge enables robots to complete given tasks which cannot be completed without organ izational knowledge.

  • Introduction

    This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction to Robots and Their Limitations, Introduction to Robot Ping-Pong, Why Ping-Pong is a Good Problem, A Preview of the Work, Implications and Application Areas, Organization of This Book



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