Neutron

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The neutron is a subatomic hadron particle which has the symbol n or n, no net electric charge and a mass slightly larger than that of a proton. (Wikipedia.org)






Conferences related to Neutron

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2020 IEEE International Conference on Plasma Science (ICOPS)

IEEE International Conference on Plasma Science (ICOPS) is an annual conference coordinated by the Plasma Science and Application Committee (PSAC) of the IEEE Nuclear & Plasma Sciences Society.


2020 IEEE International Instrumentation and Measurement Technology Conference (I2MTC)

The Conference focuses on all aspects of instrumentation and measurement science andtechnology research development and applications. The list of program topics includes but isnot limited to: Measurement Science & Education, Measurement Systems, Measurement DataAcquisition, Measurements of Physical Quantities, and Measurement Applications.


2020 IEEE International Power Modulator and High Voltage Conference (IPMHVC)

This conference provides an exchange of technical topics in the fields of Solid State Modulators and Switches, Breakdown and Insulation, Compact Pulsed Power Systems, High Voltage Design, High Power Microwaves, Biological Applications, Analytical Methods and Modeling, and Accelerators.


2019 IEEE 28th Symposium on Fusion Engineering (SOFE)

fusion engineering, physics and materials, plasma heating, vacuum technology, tritium processing, fueling, first walls, blankets and divertors


2019 IEEE International Reliability Physics Symposium (IRPS)

Meeting of academia and research professionals to discuss reliability challenges.


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Periodicals related to Neutron

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Applied Superconductivity, IEEE Transactions on

Contains articles on the applications and other relevant technology. Electronic applications include analog and digital circuits employing thin films and active devices such as Josephson junctions. Power applications include magnet design as well asmotors, generators, and power transmission


Automatic Control, IEEE Transactions on

The theory, design and application of Control Systems. It shall encompass components, and the integration of these components, as are necessary for the construction of such systems. The word `systems' as used herein shall be interpreted to include physical, biological, organizational and other entities and combinations thereof, which can be represented through a mathematical symbolism. The Field of Interest: shall ...


Computer Architecture Letters

Rigorously peer-reviewed forum for publishing early, high-impact results in the areas of uni- and multiprocessors computer systems, computer architecture workload characterization, performance evaluation and simulation techniques, and power-aware computing


Device and Materials Reliability, IEEE Transactions on

Provides leading edge information that is critical to the creation of reliable electronic devices and materials, and a focus for interdisciplinary communication in the state of the art of reliability of electronic devices, and the materials used in their manufacture. It focuses on the reliability of electronic, optical, and magnetic devices, and microsystems; the materials and processes used in the ...


Electron Devices, IEEE Transactions on

Publishes original and significant contributions relating to the theory, design, performance and reliability of electron devices, including optoelectronics devices, nanoscale devices, solid-state devices, integrated electronic devices, energy sources, power devices, displays, sensors, electro-mechanical devices, quantum devices and electron tubes.


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Xplore Articles related to Neutron

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Neutron spectrometer automation at the Lujan Center

2007 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium Conference Record, 2007

The Lujan Center at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is a spallation neutron source where research in materials and biological sciences is conducted on time-of-flight neutron scattering spectrometers on eleven beam lines. Execution of an experiment on a neutron spectrometer involves 1) control of the sample environment equipment, 2) measurement of the scattered neutrons, and 3) ...


<sup>6</sup>LiF:ZnS(Ag) Mixture Optimization for a Highly Efficient Ultrathin Cold Neutron Detector

IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science, 2018

We report the optimization of6LiF:ZnS(Ag) scintillator mixtures for an ultrathin (<;2 mm), highly efficient cold neutron detector. Preliminary results with early prototypes demonstrated excellent absorption for 3.62-meV (4.75-Å wavelength) neutrons but mediocre neutron sensitivity (≈ 30%). Our optimization took the form of exploring the weight ratios of neutron converter, phosphor, and binder to promote high neutron capture probability and light ...


Wavelength-shifting-fiber scintillation detectors for thermal neutron imaging at SNS

2011 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium Conference Record, 2011

We have developed a wavelength-Shifting-fiber Scintillator Detector (SSD) with a 0.3 m2area per module. Each module has 154 × 7 pixels and a 5 mm × 50 mm pixel size. Our goal is to design a large area neutron detector offering higher detection efficiency and higher count-rate capability for Time-Of- Flight (TOF) neutron diffraction in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). ...


A New Neutron Beam Facility for SEE Testing

2005 8th European Conference on Radiation and Its Effects on Components and Systems, 2005

A new quasi-monoenergetic neutron beam facility has been constructed at The Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala, Sweden. The new facility has been designed specifically to provide optimal conditions for testing of single-event effects in electronics. Key features include a neutron energy range of 20 to 175 MeV, high fluxes, user flux control, flexible neutron field size and shape, and spacious and ...


Neutron scattering data acquisition and control upgrades at the Lujan Center

2009 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium Conference Record (NSS/MIC), 2009

The Lujan Center at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is a spallation neutron source where research in materials, physics, and biological sciences is conducted on time-of-flight neutron scattering spectrometers. Execution of an experiment on a Lujan Center neutron spectrometer involves measurement of the neutrons scattered from the sample and the control of the associated sample environment ...


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Educational Resources on Neutron

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IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Neutron spectrometer automation at the Lujan Center

    The Lujan Center at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is a spallation neutron source where research in materials and biological sciences is conducted on time-of-flight neutron scattering spectrometers on eleven beam lines. Execution of an experiment on a neutron spectrometer involves 1) control of the sample environment equipment, 2) measurement of the scattered neutrons, and 3) operation of the beam line itself. This paper describes the automation and coordination of these functions that is essential to effective conduct of experiments.

  • <sup>6</sup>LiF:ZnS(Ag) Mixture Optimization for a Highly Efficient Ultrathin Cold Neutron Detector

    We report the optimization of6LiF:ZnS(Ag) scintillator mixtures for an ultrathin (<;2 mm), highly efficient cold neutron detector. Preliminary results with early prototypes demonstrated excellent absorption for 3.62-meV (4.75-Å wavelength) neutrons but mediocre neutron sensitivity (≈ 30%). Our optimization took the form of exploring the weight ratios of neutron converter, phosphor, and binder to promote high neutron capture probability and light transport within the medium. We characterized a series of6LiF:ZnS(Ag):binder mixtures for neutron absorption, light yield, and light transmission properties. In the process, we determined the optimal configuration for our requirements of millimeter thickness and cold neutron energy. Optimized prototypes exhibit excellent absorption and demonstrate neutron sensitivities of above 85% for 3.27-meV neutrons and gamma ray rejection ratios approaching 10-7.

  • Wavelength-shifting-fiber scintillation detectors for thermal neutron imaging at SNS

    We have developed a wavelength-Shifting-fiber Scintillator Detector (SSD) with a 0.3 m2area per module. Each module has 154 × 7 pixels and a 5 mm × 50 mm pixel size. Our goal is to design a large area neutron detector offering higher detection efficiency and higher count-rate capability for Time-Of- Flight (TOF) neutron diffraction in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). A ZnS/6LiF scintillator combined with a novel fiber encoding scheme (v.3) was used to record the neutron events. A Cross-fiber Read-Out-Card (CROC) based digital-signal processing electronics and position-determination algorithm was applied for neutron imaging. Neutron-gamma discrimination was carried out using Pulse-Shape Discrimination (PSD). A sandwiched flat scintillator detector can have a detection efficiency close to He-3 tubes (about 10 atm). A single layer and sandwiched flat scintillator detectors have count rate capabilities of about 6,000 and 35,000 cps/cm2, respectively, which can satisfy the count rate requirement of powder diffractometers at SNS. Detectors with v.3 fiber encoding have better image quality and higher spatial resolution than those with previous v.2 fiber encoding.

  • A New Neutron Beam Facility for SEE Testing

    A new quasi-monoenergetic neutron beam facility has been constructed at The Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala, Sweden. The new facility has been designed specifically to provide optimal conditions for testing of single-event effects in electronics. Key features include a neutron energy range of 20 to 175 MeV, high fluxes, user flux control, flexible neutron field size and shape, and spacious and easily accessible user area. Results of beam characterization measurements are reported.

  • Neutron scattering data acquisition and control upgrades at the Lujan Center

    The Lujan Center at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is a spallation neutron source where research in materials, physics, and biological sciences is conducted on time-of-flight neutron scattering spectrometers. Execution of an experiment on a Lujan Center neutron spectrometer involves measurement of the neutrons scattered from the sample and the control of the associated sample environment and beam line equipment. The present data acquisition and control architecture was developed in the late 1990s and put into production in 2001. We have recently reevaluated our present systems and architecture and embarked on upgrades in several key areas. These upgrades include moving from a Windows/VxWorks data acquisition environment to a uniform Linux-based environment for both host and distributed processors. We abandoned our previous higher-level xUML-based software development methodology and moved to a more conventional approach based on open source tools. Finally, we have begun to migrate the control software for our sample environment equipment from Labview to EPICS to take advantage of the stability and networking integration it provides. The upgrades were used initially on three instruments in 2008 and expanded to five instruments in 2009. We plan a phased roll out to the remaining instruments over the next two years.

  • Neutron beam design for low-intensity neutron and gamma-ray radioscopy using small neutron sources

    Two small neutron sources of /sup 252/Cf and /sup 241/Am-Be radioisotopes were used for design of neutron beams applicable to low-intensity neutron and gamma-ray radioscopy (LINGR). In the design, Monte Carlo code (MCNP) was employed to generate neutron and gamma-ray beams suited to LINGR. With a view to variable neutron spectrum and neutron intensity, various arrangements were first examined, and neutron-filter, gamma-ray shield, and beam collimator were verified. Monte Carlo calculations indicated that with a suitable filter- shield-collimator arrangement, thermal neutron beam of 3900 ncm/sup -2/s/sup -1/ with neutron/gamma ratio of 7 /spl times/ 10/sup 7/, and 25 ncm/sup -2/s/sup -1/ with very large neutron/gamma ratio, respectively, could be produced by using a /sup 252/Cf (122 /spl mu/g) and a /sup 241/Am-Be (37 GBq) radioisotopes at the irradiation port of 35 cm from the neutron sources.

  • Development of a neutron flux monitor using a small scintillator coupled with quartz fiber for a Cyclotron-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    At Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute(KURRI), we installed a Cyclotron-Based Epithermal Neutron Source(C-BENS) for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy(BNCT). C-BENS consists of a cyclotron accelerator that can provide a ~ 1000 μA, 30 MeV proton beam, a neutron production beryllium target and the moderator that can reduce the energy of fast neutrons to an effective energy range. C-BENS can provide epithermal neutron flux of 1.2 × 109(cm-2s-1) larger than that of conventional reactor-based neutron sources which have been using for clinical trials of BNCT. During irradiation of BNCT, it is important to detect neutron flux up to 109(cm-2s-1). Now we have been developing the real- time neutron flux monitor with the characteristics such as the resistance of radiation damage and low attenuation rate in optical fiber. To evaluate detection system, the thermal neutron irradiation field using C-BENS in water phantom with the thermal neutron flux from 108to 109was used. The good linearity between the detector counts and thermal neutron flux was obtained.

  • Thermal Neutron Filter Design for the Neutron Radiography Facility at the LVR-15 Reactor

    In the year 2011, a research project has started focus on building of a neutron radiography facility at the LVR-15 research reactor in Rez, Czech Republic. One of the unused horizontal channels was chosen to be adapted for this purpose. However, the original beam parameters having a high presence on fast neutrons which may damage the neutron detector, and gamma radiation which causes undesired background were unsuitable. The need for an intensive thermal neutron beam with a very low fast neutron ratio led to the decision of installing a thermal neutron filter into the channel tube. As the channel layout is very spatial limiting, a simple solution had to be chosen. Usually large single-crystal ingots of proper material parameters can be used as filters. Single-crystal silicon was chosen as the preferred filter material for its availability in sufficient dimensions and low production costs. Additionally to its ability to significantly reduce the ratio of fast neutrons in the beam, if the filter dimensions are large enough, it provides shielding against the reactor gamma radiation. For the calculation of the required beam dimensions the Monte-Carlo MCNP transport code was used. However, as the code does not include the neutron cross-section libraries for thermal neutron scattering on crystalline structures, the original silicon cross-section libraries had been manually modified using an approximated relation based on thermal neutron scattering theory. Carrying out a series of calculations the filter thickness of 1 m proved good for gaining a beam with desired parameters and a low gamma background. After mounting the filter inside the channel several measurements of the neutron field were realized at the beam exit. The results have justified the calculated values. After the successful filter installing and a series of measurements, first test neutron radiography attempts with chosen samples could been carried out.

  • Comparison between Silicon-arbide and Diamond for Thermal neutron detection at Room Temperature

    Neutron radiation detector for nuclear reactor applications plays an important role in getting information about the actual neutron yield and reactor environment. Such detector must be able to operate at high neutron flux levels (>109n/(cm2s)) and discriminate the neutron and gammaresponses in the nuclear reactor's mixed neutron-gamma environment. Moreover such a detector must have fast and stable response over considerable long period of use. Silicon Carbide and Diamond are the most attractive semiconductor materials for neutron detection in severe media (high temperature, high gamma dose rate and high neutron fluxes). Thanks to their outstanding properties, such as high displacement threshold energy and wide band gap energy, SiC and Diamond can operate in harsh environment (high temperature and high radiation level). The aim of this work is to compare the ability to detect thermal neutrons of these two semi-conductors at the same irradiation conditions. For this purpose, the neutron irradiation tests of detectors were implemented at MINERVE research reactor at CEA Cadarache. Both kinds of detectors show the linear evaluation of the count rate in the thermal neutroninduced peak with the reactor power. Our results reveal that the 4H-SiC-based neutron detector shows worse neutron to gamma discrimination in comparison to the sCVD diamond-based detector when the reverse bias voltage is applied to the 4H-SiC diode. The best neutron to gamma discrimination, though, is obtained with the 4H-SiC-based detector at 0V.

  • Design and Performance of a Thermal Neutron Imaging Facility at the North Carolina State University PULSTAR Reactor

    A thermal neutron imaging facility has been set up at the North Carolina State University PULSTAR reactor. The PULSTAR is an open pool light water moderated 1 MWth research reactor with six beam tubes. The present facility is set up on beam tube # 5 of the reactor. The facility is intended to have radiographic and tomographic capabilities. The design of the neutron collimator was performed using MCNP5. The collimator includes a 4-in bismuth filter followed by a 6-in single-crystal sapphire filter. Thermal neutron scattering cross- section libraries for sapphire and bismuth were generated and used in the MCNP simulation of the system. Based on the current design, the L/D of the facility ranges between 100 and 150. The neutron flux at the image plane can be varied from 1.8times10<sup>6</sup> to 7times10<sup>6</sup> n/cm<sup>2</sup>middots with a Cd-ratio of ~450. The resolution of the system for different imaging media was also estimated and found to be ~33 mum for conventional radiography film and ~110 mum for digital image plates. Initial measurements, using ASTM standards, show that the imaging facility achieves a beam quality classification of I<sup>A</sup>



Standards related to Neutron

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No standards are currently tagged "Neutron"