Conferences related to Virtual Reality

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2018 13th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

HRI is a highly selective annual conference that showcases the very best research and thinking in human-robot interaction. HRI is inherently interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary, reflecting work from researchersin robotics, psychology, cognitive science, HCI, human factors, artificial intelligence, organizational behavior,anthropology, and many other fields.

  • 2019 14th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    HRI is a highly selective annual conference that showcases the very best research and thinking in human-robot interaction. HRI is inherently interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary, reflecting work from researchers in robotics, psychology, cognitive science, HCI, human factors, artificial intelligence, organizational behavior, anthropology, and many other fields.

  • 2017 12th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    The conference serves as the primary annual meeting for researchers in the field of human-robot interaction. The event will include a main papers track and additional sessions for posters, demos, and exhibits. Additionally, the conference program will include a full day of workshops and tutorials running in parallel.

  • 2016 11th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    This conference focuses on the interaction between humans and robots.

  • 2015 10th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    HRI is a single -track, highly selective annual conference that showcases the very bestresearch and thinking in human -robot interaction. HRI is inherently interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary,reflecting work from researchers in robotics, psychology, cognitive science, HCI, human factors, artificialintelligence, organizational behavior, anthropology, and many other fields.

  • 2014 9th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    HRI is a highly selective annual conference that showcases the very best research and thinking in human -robot interaction. HRI is inherently interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary, reflecting work from researchers in robotics, psychology, cognitive science, HCI, human factors, artificial intelligence, organizational behavior, anthropology, and many other fields.

  • 2013 8th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    HRI is a single -track, highly selective annual conference that showcases the very best research and thinking in human-robot interaction. HRI is inherently interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary, reflecting work from researchers in robotics, psychology, cognitive science, HCI, human factors, artificial intelligence, organizational behavior, anthropology, and many other fields.

  • 2012 7th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    HRI is a single-track, highly selective annual conference that showcases the very best research and thinking in human-robot interaction. HRI is inherently interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary, reflecting work from researchers in robotics, psychology, cognitive science, HCI, human factors, artificial intelligence, organizational behavior, anthropology, and many other fields.

  • 2011 6th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    Robot companions Lifelike robots Assistive (health & personal care) robotics Remote robots Mixed initiative interaction Multi-modal interaction Long-term interaction with robots Awareness and monitoring of humans Task allocation and coordination Autonomy and trust Robot-team learning User studies of HRI Experiments on HRI collaboration Ethnography and field studies HRI software architectures HRI foundations Metrics for teamwork HRI group dynamics.

  • 2010 5th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    TOPICS: Robot companions, Lifelike robots, Assistive (health & personal care) robotics, Remote robots, Mixed initiative interaction, Multi-modal interaction, Long-term interaction with robots, Awareness and monitoring of humans, Task allocation and coordination, Autonomy and trust, Robot-team learning, User studies of HRI, Experiments on HRI collaboration, Ethnography and field studies, HRI software architectures

  • 2009 4th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    * Robot companions * Lifelike robots * Assistive (health & personal care) robotics * Remote robots * Mixed initiative interaction * Multi-modal interaction * Long-term interaction with robots * Awareness and monitoring of humans * Task allocation and coordination * Autonomy and trust * Robot-team learning * User studies of HRI * Experiments on HRI collaboration * Ethnography and field studies * HRI software architectures

  • 2008 3rd ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    Robot companions Lifelike robots Assistive (health & personal care) robotics Remote robots Mixed initiative interaction Multi-modal interaction Long-term interaction with robots Awareness and monitoring of humans Task allocation and coordination Autonomy and trust Robot-team learning User studies of HRI Experiments on HRI collaboration Ethnography and field studies HRI software architectures HRI foundations Metrics for teamwork HRI group dynamics Individual vs. group HRI

  • 2007 2nd Annual Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)


2018 40th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC)

The conference program will consist of plenary lectures, symposia, workshops and invitedsessions of the latest significant findings and developments in all the major fields of biomedical engineering.Submitted papers will be peer reviewed. Accepted high quality papers will be presented in oral and postersessions, will appear in the Conference Proceedings and will be indexed in PubMed/MEDLINE


2018 41st International Convention on Information and Communication Technology, Electronicsand Microelectronics (MIPRO)

Computer in Technical Systems, Intelligent Systems, Distributed Computing and VisualizationSystems, Communication Systems, Information Systems Security, Digital Economy, Computersin Education, Microelectronics, Electronic Technology, Education


2018 European Conference on Optical Communication (ECOC)

ECOC is the leading European conference in the field of optical communication, and one of the most prestigious and long-standing events in this field. Here, the latest progress in optical communication technologies will be reported in selected papers, keynotes, presentations and special symposia.Parallel to the scientific conference, the ECOC exhibition covers a wide range of optical communication products and services.Therefore, ECOC is open to a variety of interested participants like researchers and students, product developers, sales managers and telecommunication market developers. Every year this international forum attracts more than 1,000 scientists and researchers from research institutions and companies from across the world.


2018 IEEE 18th International Conference on Advanced Learning Technologies (ICALT)

ICALT is an annual international conference on Advanced Learning Technologies and Technology-enhanced Learning organized by the IEEE Technical Committee on Learning Technology. It aims to bring together people who are working on the design, development, use and evaluation of technologies that will be the foundation of the next generation of e-learning systems and technology-enhanced learning environments.


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Periodicals related to Virtual Reality

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Automatic Control, IEEE Transactions on

The theory, design and application of Control Systems. It shall encompass components, and the integration of these components, as are necessary for the construction of such systems. The word `systems' as used herein shall be interpreted to include physical, biological, organizational and other entities and combinations thereof, which can be represented through a mathematical symbolism. The Field of Interest: shall ...


Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Reviews in

The IEEE Reviews in Biomedical Engineering will review the state-of-the-art and trends in the emerging field of biomedical engineering. This includes scholarly works, ranging from historic and modern development in biomedical engineering to the life sciences and medicine enabled by technologies covered by the various IEEE societies.


Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Broad coverage of concepts and methods of the physical and engineering sciences applied in biology and medicine, ranging from formalized mathematical theory through experimental science and technological development to practical clinical applications.


Broadcasting, IEEE Transactions on

Broadcast technology, including devices, equipment, techniques, and systems related to broadcast technology, including the production, distribution, transmission, and propagation aspects.


Circuits and Systems for Video Technology, IEEE Transactions on

Video A/D and D/A, display technology, image analysis and processing, video signal characterization and representation, video compression techniques and signal processing, multidimensional filters and transforms, analog video signal processing, neural networks for video applications, nonlinear video signal processing, video storage and retrieval, computer vision, packet video, high-speed real-time circuits, VLSI architecture and implementation for video technology, multiprocessor systems--hardware and software-- ...


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Most published Xplore authors for Virtual Reality

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Xplore Articles related to Virtual Reality

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Internet of Things (IoT) for Seamless Virtual Reality Space: Challenges and Perspectives

[{u'author_order': 1, u'affiliation': u'Graduate School of Nano IT Design Fusion, Seoul National University of Science and Technology (SeoulTech), 232 Gongneung-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul 01811, South Korea.', u'full_name': u'Dongho You'}, {u'author_order': 2, u'affiliation': u'Graduate School of Nano IT Design Fusion, Seoul National University of Science and Technology (SeoulTech), 232 Gongneung-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul 01811, South Korea.', u'full_name': u'Bong-Seok Seo'}, {u'author_order': 3, u'affiliation': u'Graduate School of Nano IT Design Fusion, Seoul National University of Science and Technology (SeoulTech), 232 Gongneung-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul 01811, South Korea.', u'full_name': u'Eunyoung Jeong'}, {u'author_order': 4, u'affiliation': u'Graduate School of Nano IT Design Fusion, Seoul National University of Science and Technology (SeoulTech), 232 Gongneung-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul 01811, South Korea.', u'full_name': u'Dong Ho Kim'}] IEEE Access, None

This paper addresses a novel virtual reality (VR) system that is based on the real world in which we live. The ultimate goal is to implement it as though a VR user freely exists in a place. To this end, it is most important to reconstruct a VR space that provides 6 degree-of-freedom (DOFs), namely, yaw, pitch, roll, surge, sway, ...


Echo state transfer learning for data correlation aware resource allocation in wireless virtual reality

[{u'author_order': 1, u'affiliation': u'Beijing Key Laboratory of Network System Architecture and Convergence, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing, China 100876', u'full_name': u'Mingzhe Chen'}, {u'author_order': 2, u'affiliation': u'Wireless@VT, Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, USA', u'full_name': u'Walid Saad'}, {u'author_order': 3, u'affiliation': u'Beijing Key Laboratory of Network System Architecture and Convergence, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing, China 100876', u'full_name': u'Changchuan Yin'}, {u'author_order': 4, u'affiliation': u'Mathematical and Algorithmic Sciences Lab, Huawei France R&D, Paris, France', u'full_name': u'M\xe9rouane Debbah'}] 2017 51st Asilomar Conference on Signals, Systems, and Computers, None

In this paper, the problem of data correlation-aware resource management is studied for a network of wireless virtual reality (VR) users communicating over cloud-based small cell networks (SCNs). In the studied model, small base stations (SBSs) with limited computational resources act as VR control centers that collect the tracking information from VR users over the cellular uplink and send them ...


360-Degree Virtual-Reality Cameras for the Masses

[{u'author_order': 1, u'affiliation': u'Kandao', u'full_name': u'Jack Tan'}, {u'author_order': 2, u'affiliation': u'National Institute of Informatics, Tokyo', u'full_name': u'Gene Cheung'}, {u'author_order': 3, u'affiliation': u'Kandao', u'full_name': u'Rui Ma'}] IEEE MultiMedia, 2018

To make VR cameras more accessible to the public, devices must be affordable, portable, reliable, high quality, and user friendly. In this article, we describe the challenges in meeting these goals and the techniques that Kandao --a VR startup company based in China--used to conquer them when designing its Obsidian cameras.


Virtual Reality and Recommendation System to Design Mobility System

[{u'author_order': 1, u'full_name': u'Alex Gabriel'}, {u'author_order': 2, u'full_name': u'Mario Ortiz'}] 2017 13th International Conference on Signal-Image Technology & Internet-Based Systems (SITIS), None

In the domain of urbanism and more particularly the design of mobility system, the end-users are poorly involved whereas they condition the success of new infrastructure. The generalization of policies for active mobility urges the importance of correctly design the system of mobility. The success goes through the consideration of end-user needs. However, there is always a gap between the ...


Effects of robot-mediated gait training combined with virtual reality system

[{u'author_order': 1, u'affiliation': u'Department of Physical Therapy, International University of Korea', u'full_name': u'Wan Suck Choi'}, {u'author_order': 2, u'affiliation': u'Department of Rehabilitation Engineering & Assistive Technology, National Rehabilitation Center', u'full_name': u'Hyo Sun Kwon'}, {u'author_order': 3, u'affiliation': u'Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Medical and Health Care, Kyung Bok University', u'full_name': u'Woo Kwon Park'}, {u'author_order': 4, u'affiliation': u'Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Medical and Health Care, Kyung Bok University', u'full_name': u'Jin Hyuk Park'}, {u'author_order': 5, u'affiliation': u'Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Medical and Health Care, Kyung Bok University', u'full_name': u'Su Bin Lee'}, {u'author_order': 6, u'affiliation': u'Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Medical and Health Care, Kyung Bok University', u'full_name': u'Seo Yoon Heo'}] 2018 International Conference on Electronics, Information, and Communication (ICEIC), None

Previous robot-mediated gait training has been proven several limitations such as pointless repeated motion training, decreased presence, etc. In this research, adult stroke patients were participated in robot-mediated gait training accompanied with virtual reality program. The results indicated virtual reality system could contribute to muscle strength and balance ability.


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Educational Resources on Virtual Reality

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eLearning

No eLearning Articles are currently tagged "Virtual Reality"

IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Spatial Sound Scene Synthesis and Manipulation for Virtual Reality and Audio Effects

    This chapter covers DirAC‐based parametric time‐frequency domain (TF domain) audio techniques where the virtual sound scene is synthesized based on a geometric description of it around the avatar. Time‐frequency domain parametric spatial audio techniques also have applications in audio engineering, in addition to applications in virtual reality. The basic processing block of DirAC‐based spatialization in virtual worlds is the DirAC monosynth. When producing audio for virtual reality, often some recorded speech, music, and/or environmental sounds are used as signals for virtual sources. The chapter presents the application of parametric analysis and synthesis to spatial audio effects, using the DirAC framework. The ambience extraction method attempts to make foreground sounds with a clear direction softer, while preserving background sounds or ambience. Spatialization of a monophonic audio channel, either to a multichannel audio reproduction setup or as background sound in virtual reality, is a useful task in many audio engineering applications.

  • Virtual Reality and Computer Simulation

    This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction Background: The Technology and its Applications Virtuality and Reality Representation and Simulation: Ethical Issues Behavior in Virtual Environments: Ethical Issues The Ethics of Computer Games Virtual Reality, Simulation, and Professional Ethics References

  • Virtual Reality and Virtual Environments in 10 Lectures

    The book is based on the material originally developed for the course on Virtual Reality, which the author was teaching at Tampere University of Technology, as well as course on Virtual Environments that the author had prepared for the University for Advancing Studies at Tempe, Arizona. This original purpose has influenced the structure of this book as well as the depth to which we explore the presented concepts. Therefore, our intention in this book is to give an introduction into the important issues regarding a series of related concepts of Virtual Reality, Augmented Reality, and Virtual Environments. We do not attempt to go into any of these issues in depth but rather outline general principles and discuss them in a sense broad enough to provide sufficient foundations for a further study. In other words, we aim to provide a set of keywords to the reader in order give him a good starting point from which he could go on and explore any of these issues in detail.

  • Simulating Contacts between Objects in Virtual Reality with Auditory, Visual, and Haptic Feedback

    This chapter contain sections titled: 15.1 Related work, 15.2 The Contact State and Temporal Evolution of the Contact State, 15.3 Computation of Contact States and Events, 15.4 Multimodal Rendering Based on Contact States and Events, 15.5 Conclusion, Note, References

  • Sound in Virtual Reality

    Sound is an integral part of every user experience but a neglected medium in design disciplines. Design of an artifact's sonic qualities is often limited to the shaping of functional, representational, and signaling roles of sound. The interdisciplinary field of sonic interaction design (SID) challenges these prevalent approaches by considering sound as an active medium that can enable novel sensory and social experiences through interactive technologies. This book offers an overview of the emerging SID research, discussing theories, methods, and practices, with a focus on the multisensory aspects of sonic experience. Sonic Interaction Design gathers contributions from scholars, artists, and designers working at the intersections of fields ranging from electronic music to cognitive science. They offer both theoretical considerations of key themes and case studies of products and systems created for such contexts as mobile music, sensorimotor learning, rehabilitation, and gaming. The goal is not only to extend the existing research and pedagogical approaches to SID but also to foster domains of practice for sound designers, architects, interaction designers, media artists, product designers, and urban planners. Taken together, the chapters provide a foundation for a still- emerging field, affording a new generation of designers a fresh perspective on interactive sound as a situated and multisensory experience.Contributors: Federico Avanzini, Gerold Baier, Stephen Barrass, Olivier Bau, Karin Bijsterveld, Roberto Bresin, Stephen Brewster, Jeremy Coopersotck, Amalia De Gotzen, Stefano Delle Monache, Cumhur Erkut, George Essl, Karmen Franinovi¿¿, Bruno L. Giordano, Antti Jylh¿¿, Thomas Hermann, Daniel Hug, Johan Kildal, Stefan Krebs, Anatole Lecuyer, Wendy Mackay, David Merrill, Roderick Murray- Smith, Sile O'Modhrain, Pietro Polotti, Hayes Raffle, Michal Rinott, Davide Rocchesso, Antonio Rod¿¿, Christopher Salter, Zack Settel, Stefania Serafin, Simone Spagnol, Jean Sreng, Patrick Susini, Atau Tanaka, Yon Visell, Mike Wezniewski, John Williamson

  • Combining BCI and Virtual Reality: Scouting Virtual Worlds

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) is a closed-loop system with feedback as one important component. Dependent on the BCI application either to establish communication in patients with severe motor paralysis, to control neuroprosthesis, or to perform neurofeedback, information is visually fed back to the user about success or failure of the intended act. One way to realize feedback is the use of virtual reality (VR). In this chapter, an overview is given of BCI-based control of VR. In addition, four examples are reported in more detail about navigating in virtual environments with a cue-based (synchronous) and an uncued (asynchronous) BCI. Similar results in different virtual worlds with different types of motor imageries could be achieved, but no significant differences in the BCI classification accuracy were observed between VR and non-VR feedback. Nevertheless, the use of VR stimulated the subject's task performances and provided motivation.

  • Virtual Reality and MedicineChallenges for the TwentyFirst Century

    Robert Mann first proposed a virtual reality (VR) system for medical applications in 1965. His initial ideas were for a rehabilitation application for virtual reality. Later, his vision was to develop a system that would allow surgeons to test out multiple operations for a given orthopedic problem. Then in a virtual environment (VE), the clock could be speeded up to predict the future outcome of different surgical approaches. In effect, the patient could leave the operating table, go through rehabilitation, and then return for evaluation. The surgeon could then pick the best choice for the real operation. This approach would need a model that was not only patient specific but also accurate in terms of the deformity and its response to treatment over time. This is the ultimate goal for the twenty-first century for a VR system in surgery. It is difficult to create a model of the human body that is realistic enough to accurately portray a surgical mission that is planned. The interface tools that are presently available are much more advanced than the ones discussed here that were available to NASA in the 1980s; however, without a true model to interact with they are unable to provide the realism for surgical education and training that is needed. Present cadaver laboratories and training through hands-on experience provide the majority of medical education today in surgery. It is unlikely that present VR simulators will change this without a significant improvements in the models. Most of the author's work has been directed at creating digital models of humans. Some of this work is reviewed and what needs to be done is emphasized, rather than focus on what has already been accomplished. Systems are presently available for many medical training applications, including microsurgery, urology, general surgery, heart surgery, vascular sur gery, eye surgery, otolaryngology, military wound d?bridement, and obstetrics. Ultimately these systems will be able to provide teaching at a distance for telemedicine and telesurgery. The goal of this chapter is to better define where is needed to make improvements in the human body models for all of these systems. Most of these systems assume normal tissue properties and do not address the response over time of the tissues to the disease state, to the surgical intervention, or to the healing process. The pathologic state of tissues and the tissue's response to interventions over time should be the next grand challenge in virtual reality and medicine.

  • Virtual Reality and Its Integration into a Twenty-First Century Telemedical Information Society

    This chapter discusses the foundational building blocks approach in creating a Telemedical Information Society. It can be seen that advanced imaging techniques such as virtual reality can be easily integrated. The pragmatics of defining and creating virtual environments are abstracted from the practitioner. A practitioner then has the choice, depending on the supportive hardware, on how to visualize the patient data. This chapter does not concentrate on specifics or detail use explanations. It outlines a framework for how advanced imaging techniques could be integrated into a general Telemedical Information Society. If costs are reduced, the technology will become more widespread. This chapter discusses the elements of a Telemedical Information Society. Virtual reality for education and training, for diagnostics purposes, and the future for VR are presented.

  • Virtual Reality for Health Care

    The basis for the virtual reality (VR) idea is that a computer can synthesise a three-dimensional (3-D) graphical environment from numerical data. Using visual and auditory output devices, the human operator can experience the environment as if it were a part of the world. This computer-generated world may be either a model of a real-world object, such as a house; or an abstract world that does not exist in a real sense but is understood by humans, such as a chemical molecule or a representation of a set of data; or it might be in a completely imaginary science fiction world. Furthermore, because input devices sense the operator's reactions and motions, the operator can modify the synthetic environment, creating the illusion of interacting with and thus being immersed within the environment. The following topics are covered here: VR and telepresence; Definitions; Technology overview; Market analysis; Virtual reality in health care; and Telemedicine.

  • Anatomic VisualizeR: Teaching and Learning Anatomy with Virtual Reality

    The University of California San Diego (UCSD) School of Medicine's Learning Resources Center (LRC) has been actively engaged in the development and implementation of a virtual reality (VR) based application for education and training. The resultant product, _VisualizeR_, is a virtual environment (VE) designed to support the teaching and learning of any subject that requires an understanding of three-dimensional (3-D) structures and complex spatial relationships. _VisualizeR_'s multimodal application interface approach, named virtual reality-multimedia synthesis (VR-MMS), enables interaction with 3-D models and concurrent access to multimedia resources, including text, images, animations, video, and sound. Moreover, the flexible and extensible _VisualizeR_ architecture accommodates the needs of a wide variety of different teaching approaches and provides the capability for dynamic and unstructured student exploration. The scientific domain selected for UCSD's first _VisualizeR_ lessons was human anatomy, because it represented one context in which a VR-MMS-based strategy was both achievable and apropos. While still considered the gold standard against which alternatives are judged, current educational methods?-? a combination of lectures and laboratory dissections?-? fall short of instilling the requisite 3-D conceptualization, retention, and application of anatomic knowledge to clinical-problem solving. These pedagogical challenges are further complicated by shortened anatomy curricula owing to competition from other courses; the desirability of less dependence on human cadavers because of scarcity, costs, aesthetics, and environmental concerns; and reductions in hours and resources (including faculty) available for wet laboratory coursework. At the same time, many curricula are including greater amounts of anat omic information, including conceptually challenging 3-D relationships, a need that could be well met by VR-based anatomy resources.



Standards related to Virtual Reality

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No standards are currently tagged "Virtual Reality"