Conferences related to Virtual Reality

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2018 13th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

HRI is a highly selective annual conference that showcases the very best research and thinking in human-robot interaction. HRI is inherently interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary, reflecting work from researchersin robotics, psychology, cognitive science, HCI, human factors, artificial intelligence, organizational behavior,anthropology, and many other fields.

  • 2019 14th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    HRI is a highly selective annual conference that showcases the very best research and thinking in human-robot interaction. HRI is inherently interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary, reflecting work from researchers in robotics, psychology, cognitive science, HCI, human factors, artificial intelligence, organizational behavior, anthropology, and many other fields.

  • 2017 12th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    The conference serves as the primary annual meeting for researchers in the field of human-robot interaction. The event will include a main papers track and additional sessions for posters, demos, and exhibits. Additionally, the conference program will include a full day of workshops and tutorials running in parallel.

  • 2016 11th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    This conference focuses on the interaction between humans and robots.

  • 2015 10th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    HRI is a single -track, highly selective annual conference that showcases the very bestresearch and thinking in human -robot interaction. HRI is inherently interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary,reflecting work from researchers in robotics, psychology, cognitive science, HCI, human factors, artificialintelligence, organizational behavior, anthropology, and many other fields.

  • 2014 9th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    HRI is a highly selective annual conference that showcases the very best research and thinking in human -robot interaction. HRI is inherently interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary, reflecting work from researchers in robotics, psychology, cognitive science, HCI, human factors, artificial intelligence, organizational behavior, anthropology, and many other fields.

  • 2013 8th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    HRI is a single -track, highly selective annual conference that showcases the very best research and thinking in human-robot interaction. HRI is inherently interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary, reflecting work from researchers in robotics, psychology, cognitive science, HCI, human factors, artificial intelligence, organizational behavior, anthropology, and many other fields.

  • 2012 7th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    HRI is a single-track, highly selective annual conference that showcases the very best research and thinking in human-robot interaction. HRI is inherently interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary, reflecting work from researchers in robotics, psychology, cognitive science, HCI, human factors, artificial intelligence, organizational behavior, anthropology, and many other fields.

  • 2011 6th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    Robot companions Lifelike robots Assistive (health & personal care) robotics Remote robots Mixed initiative interaction Multi-modal interaction Long-term interaction with robots Awareness and monitoring of humans Task allocation and coordination Autonomy and trust Robot-team learning User studies of HRI Experiments on HRI collaboration Ethnography and field studies HRI software architectures HRI foundations Metrics for teamwork HRI group dynamics.

  • 2010 5th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    TOPICS: Robot companions, Lifelike robots, Assistive (health & personal care) robotics, Remote robots, Mixed initiative interaction, Multi-modal interaction, Long-term interaction with robots, Awareness and monitoring of humans, Task allocation and coordination, Autonomy and trust, Robot-team learning, User studies of HRI, Experiments on HRI collaboration, Ethnography and field studies, HRI software architectures

  • 2009 4th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    * Robot companions * Lifelike robots * Assistive (health & personal care) robotics * Remote robots * Mixed initiative interaction * Multi-modal interaction * Long-term interaction with robots * Awareness and monitoring of humans * Task allocation and coordination * Autonomy and trust * Robot-team learning * User studies of HRI * Experiments on HRI collaboration * Ethnography and field studies * HRI software architectures

  • 2008 3rd ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    Robot companions Lifelike robots Assistive (health & personal care) robotics Remote robots Mixed initiative interaction Multi-modal interaction Long-term interaction with robots Awareness and monitoring of humans Task allocation and coordination Autonomy and trust Robot-team learning User studies of HRI Experiments on HRI collaboration Ethnography and field studies HRI software architectures HRI foundations Metrics for teamwork HRI group dynamics Individual vs. group HRI

  • 2007 2nd Annual Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)


2018 40th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC)

The conference program will consist of plenary lectures, symposia, workshops and invitedsessions of the latest significant findings and developments in all the major fields of biomedical engineering.Submitted papers will be peer reviewed. Accepted high quality papers will be presented in oral and postersessions, will appear in the Conference Proceedings and will be indexed in PubMed/MEDLINE


2018 41st International Convention on Information and Communication Technology, Electronicsand Microelectronics (MIPRO)

Computer in Technical Systems, Intelligent Systems, Distributed Computing and VisualizationSystems, Communication Systems, Information Systems Security, Digital Economy, Computersin Education, Microelectronics, Electronic Technology, Education


2018 European Conference on Optical Communication (ECOC)

ECOC is the leading European conference in the field of optical communication, and one of the most prestigious and long-standing events in this field. Here, the latest progress in optical communication technologies will be reported in selected papers, keynotes, presentations and special symposia.Parallel to the scientific conference, the ECOC exhibition covers a wide range of optical communication products and services.Therefore, ECOC is open to a variety of interested participants like researchers and students, product developers, sales managers and telecommunication market developers. Every year this international forum attracts more than 1,000 scientists and researchers from research institutions and companies from across the world.


2018 IEEE 18th International Conference on Advanced Learning Technologies (ICALT)

ICALT is an annual international conference on Advanced Learning Technologies and Technology-enhanced Learning organized by the IEEE Technical Committee on Learning Technology. It aims to bring together people who are working on the design, development, use and evaluation of technologies that will be the foundation of the next generation of e-learning systems and technology-enhanced learning environments.


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Periodicals related to Virtual Reality

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Automatic Control, IEEE Transactions on

The theory, design and application of Control Systems. It shall encompass components, and the integration of these components, as are necessary for the construction of such systems. The word `systems' as used herein shall be interpreted to include physical, biological, organizational and other entities and combinations thereof, which can be represented through a mathematical symbolism. The Field of Interest: shall ...


Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Reviews in

The IEEE Reviews in Biomedical Engineering will review the state-of-the-art and trends in the emerging field of biomedical engineering. This includes scholarly works, ranging from historic and modern development in biomedical engineering to the life sciences and medicine enabled by technologies covered by the various IEEE societies.


Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Broad coverage of concepts and methods of the physical and engineering sciences applied in biology and medicine, ranging from formalized mathematical theory through experimental science and technological development to practical clinical applications.


Broadcasting, IEEE Transactions on

Broadcast technology, including devices, equipment, techniques, and systems related to broadcast technology, including the production, distribution, transmission, and propagation aspects.


Circuits and Systems for Video Technology, IEEE Transactions on

Video A/D and D/A, display technology, image analysis and processing, video signal characterization and representation, video compression techniques and signal processing, multidimensional filters and transforms, analog video signal processing, neural networks for video applications, nonlinear video signal processing, video storage and retrieval, computer vision, packet video, high-speed real-time circuits, VLSI architecture and implementation for video technology, multiprocessor systems--hardware and software-- ...


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Xplore Articles related to Virtual Reality

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Virtual Reality-Based Multi-View Visualization of Time-Dependent Simulation Data

[{u'author_order': 1, u'affiliation': u'Virtual Reality Group RWTH Aachen University e-mail: hentschel@vr.rwth-aachen.de', u'full_name': u'Bernd Hentschel'}, {u'author_order': 2, u'affiliation': u'Virtual Reality Group RWTH Aachen University e-mail: wolter@vr.rwth-aachen.de', u'full_name': u'Marc Wolter'}, {u'author_order': 3, u'affiliation': u'Virtual Reality Group RWTH Aachen University e-mail: kuhlen@vr.rwth-aachen.de', u'full_name': u'Torsten Kuhlen'}] 2009 IEEE Virtual Reality Conference, 2009

The analysis of time-dependent simulation data is a demanding task, both in terms of computing power and time. Interactive analysis using multiple linked views has been shown to be one possible solution to this problem. However, there are two significant short-comings when limited to a standard desktop- based setup: first, complex spatial relationships are hard to understand using only 2D ...


Experimentation with the human body in virtual reality space: Body, bacteria, life-cycle

[{u'author_order': 1, u'affiliation': u'Greek-French Master \xabArt, virtual reality and multiuser systems of artistic expression\xbb, Athens School of Fine Arts - Paris-8 University; Athens, Greece', u'full_name': u'Christina Oikonomou'}, {u'author_order': 2, u'affiliation': u'Greek-French Master \xabArt, virtual reality and multiuser systems of artistic expression\xbb, Athens School of Fine Arts - Paris-8 University; Paris, France', u'full_name': u'Alain Lioret'}, {u'author_order': 3, u'affiliation': u'Greek-French Master \xabArt, virtual reality and multiuser systems of artistic expression\xbb, Athens School of Fine Arts - Paris-8 University; Athens, Greece', u'full_name': u'Manthos Santorineos'}, {u'author_order': 4, u'affiliation': u'Greek-French Master \xabArt, virtual reality and multiuser systems of artistic expression\xbb, Athens School of Fine Arts - Paris-8 University; Athens, Greece', u'full_name': u'Stavroula Zoi'}] 2017 9th International Conference on Virtual Worlds and Games for Serious Applications (VS-Games), 2017

This paper presents a work in progress, “The Body project”, concerning the development of an interactive virtual reality “artistic game” that takes place in the inner space of the human body. The human body is a particular “landscape”, intelligent not only during its natural state (alive), but also in its - after life - disintegration of components (dead). The key ...


Developing an integrated wireless system for fully immersive virtual reality environments

[{u'author_order': 1, u'affiliation': u'Virtual Reality Applications Center, Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA, USA', u'full_name': u'G. Faidley'}, {u'author_order': 2, u'affiliation': u'Virtual Reality Applications Center, Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA, USA', u'full_name': u'J. Hero'}, {u'author_order': 3, u'affiliation': u'Virtual Reality Applications Center, Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA, USA', u'full_name': u'K. Lee'}, {u'author_order': 4, u'affiliation': u'Virtual Reality Applications Center, Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA, USA', u'full_name': u'B. Lwakabamba'}, {u'author_order': 5, u'affiliation': u'Virtual Reality Applications Center, Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA, USA', u'full_name': u'R. Walstrom'}, {u'author_order': 6, u'affiliation': u'Virtual Reality Applications Center, Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA, USA', u'full_name': u'F. Chen'}, {u'author_order': 7, u'affiliation': u'Virtual Reality Applications Center, Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA, USA', u'full_name': u'J. Dickerson'}, {u'author_order': 8, u'affiliation': u'Virtual Reality Applications Center, Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA, USA', u'full_name': u'D. Rover'}, {u'author_order': 9, u'affiliation': u'Virtual Reality Applications Center, Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA, USA', u'full_name': u'R. Weber'}, {u'author_order': 10, u'affiliation': u'Virtual Reality Applications Center, Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA, USA', u'full_name': u'C. Cruz-Neira'}] Eighth International Symposium on Wearable Computers, 2004

Coupling a wearable computer with a low-power wireless sensor network allows for the introduction of novel sensors into virtual environments. Wireless sensors can be placed anywhere on the user without cabling and other complications. The wearable computer gives access to large libraries of device drivers, which allows system designers to incorporate interaction devices from the world of computer gaming into ...


Eπıλoγη∗ in Crisis∗∗

[{u'author_order': 1, u'affiliation': u'Greek-French Master \xabArt, virtual reality and multiuser systems of artistic expression\xbb Athens School of Fine Arts, Pireus street 256, 18233 Athens, Greece', u'full_name': u'Manthos Santorineos'}, {u'author_order': 2, u'affiliation': u'Greek-French Master \xabArt, virtual reality and multiuser systems of artistic expression\xbb Athens School of Fine Arts, Pireus street 256, 18233 Athens, Greece', u'full_name': u'Stavroula Zoi'}, {u'author_order': 3, u'affiliation': u'Greek-French Master \xabArt, virtual reality and multiuser systems of artistic expression\xbb Athens School of Fine Arts, Pireus street 256, 18233 Athens, Greece', u'full_name': u'Nefeli Dimitriadi'}, {u'author_order': 4, u'affiliation': u'Greek-French Master \xabArt, virtual reality and multiuser systems of artistic expression\xbb Athens School of Fine Arts, Pireus street 256, 18233 Athens, Greece', u'full_name': u'Taxiarchis Diamantopoulos'}, {u'author_order': 5, u'affiliation': u'Greek-French Master \xabArt, virtual reality and multiuser systems of artistic expression\xbb Athens School of Fine Arts, Pireus street 256, 18233 Athens, Greece', u'full_name': u'John Bardakos'}, {u'author_order': 6, u'affiliation': u'Greek-French Master \xabArt, virtual reality and multiuser systems of artistic expression\xbb Athens School of Fine Arts, Pireus street 256, 18233 Athens, Greece', u'full_name': u'Christina Chrysanthopoulou'}, {u'author_order': 7, u'affiliation': u'Greek-French Master \xabArt, virtual reality and multiuser systems of artistic expression\xbb Athens School of Fine Arts, Pireus street 256, 18233 Athens, Greece', u'full_name': u'Ifigeneia Mavridou'}, {u'author_order': 8, u'affiliation': u'Greek-French Master \xabArt, virtual reality and multiuser systems of artistic expression\xbb Athens School of Fine Arts, Pireus street 256, 18233 Athens, Greece', u'full_name': u'Anna Meli'}, {u'author_order': 9, u'affiliation': u'Greek-French Master \xabArt, virtual reality and multiuser systems of artistic expression\xbb Athens School of Fine Arts, Pireus street 256, 18233 Athens, Greece', u'full_name': u'Nikos Papadopoulos'}, {u'author_order': 10, u'affiliation': u'Greek-French Master \xabArt, virtual reality and multiuser systems of artistic expression\xbb Athens School of Fine Arts, Pireus street 256, 18233 Athens, Greece', u'full_name': u'Argyro Papathanasiou'}, {u'author_order': 11, u'affiliation': u'Greek-French Master \xabArt, virtual reality and multiuser systems of artistic expression\xbb Athens School of Fine Arts, Pireus street 256, 18233 Athens, Greece', u'full_name': u'Maria Velaora'}] 2015 IEEE Virtual Reality (VR), 2015

“Eπıλoγη in Crisis” is a work in progress that has been developed by the research group of the Greek-French Master entitled "Art, virtual reality and multiuser systems of artistic expression", in a collaboration between the Athens School of Fine Arts and the University Paris8 Saint-Denis. It concerns an interactive project which is in-between a research tool and experimental game, that ...


IEE Colloquium on 'Distributed Virtual Reality' (Digest No.121)

[] IEE Colloquium on Distributed Virtual Reality, 1993

None


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eLearning

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IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Neuro-Orthopedic Rehabilitation and Disability Solutions Using Virtual Reality Technology

    Virtual reality (VR) is an emerging technology that allows individuals to experience three-dimensional (3-D) visual, auditory, and tactile environments. Highly specialized sensors and interface devices allow the individual to become immersed and to navigate and interact with objects in a computer- generated environment. Most people associate VR with video games; however, researchers and clinicians in the medical community are becoming increasingly aware of its potential benefits for people with disabilities and for individuals recovering from injuries. The following topics are discussed: VR environments and interfaces; Diversity of VR applications; Current status of VR technology; VR-based medical applications in development; Neurologic testing and behavioral intervention; and Rehabilitation, functional movement analysis, and ergonomic studies.

  • Virtual Reality and Virtual Environments in 10 Lectures

    The book is based on the material originally developed for the course on Virtual Reality, which the author was teaching at Tampere University of Technology, as well as course on Virtual Environments that the author had prepared for the University for Advancing Studies at Tempe, Arizona. This original purpose has influenced the structure of this book as well as the depth to which we explore the presented concepts. Therefore, our intention in this book is to give an introduction into the important issues regarding a series of related concepts of Virtual Reality, Augmented Reality, and Virtual Environments. We do not attempt to go into any of these issues in depth but rather outline general principles and discuss them in a sense broad enough to provide sufficient foundations for a further study. In other words, we aim to provide a set of keywords to the reader in order give him a good starting point from which he could go on and explore any of these issues in detail.

  • Virtual Reality and the Vestibular System: A Brief Review

    Motion sickness can be one of the consequences of VR simulation. This chapter gives information on the vestibular system, both anatomy and function. It also discusses use of VR on treating various phobias, why this motion sickness occurs and the possible effect of VR simulation on patients with balance disorders. Problem 1. A 25-year-old man sits in a flight simulator and plays with the instrument for 2 h. Afterward he feels nauseated and unsteady, experiences imbalance, and vomits. The symptoms quickly disappear, but he must wait several hours before driving home. Problem 2. A 25-year-old male patient comes to the emergency room complaining of sudden attacks of spinning dizziness, nausea; he vomits several times. The acute symptoms gradually go away; however, for months afterward he feels unsteady and experiences instability in his vision (the world jiggles when he walks or drives a car). What is the connection between these two situations? In both cases, the description of the individuals are the same and the symptoms are similar.

  • Virtual Reality in Medicine and Biology

    The practice of medicine and major segments of the biologic sciences have always relied on visualizations of the relationship of anatomic structure to biologic function. Traditionally, these visualizations either have been direct, via vivisection and postmortem examination, or have required extensive mental reconstruction, as in the microscopic examination of serial histologic sections. The revolutionary capabilities of new three-dimensional (3-D) and four-dimensional (4-D) imaging modalities and the new 3-D scanning microscope technologies underscore the vital importance of spatial visualization to these sciences. Computer reconstruction and rendering of multidimensional medical and histologic image data obviate the taxing need for mental reconstruction and provide a powerful new visualization tool for biologists and physicians. Voxel-based computer visualization has a number of important uses in basic research, clinical diagnosis, and treatment or surgery planning; but it is limited by relatively long rendering times and minimal possibilities for image object manipulation. The use of virtual reality (VR) technology opens new realms in the teaching and practice of medicine and biology by allowing the visualizations to be manipulated with intuitive immediacy similar to that of real objects; by allowing the viewer to enter the visualizations, taking any viewpoint; by allowing the objects to be dynamic, either in response to viewer actions or to illustrate normal or abnormal motion; and by engaging other senses, such as touch and hearing (or even smell) to enrich the visualization. Biologic applications extend across a range of scale from investigating the structure of individual cells through the organization of cells in a tissue to the representation of organs and organ systems, including functional attributes such as electrophysiologic signal distribution on the surface of an organ. They are of use as instructional aids as well as basic science research tools. Medical applications include basic anatomy instruction, surgical simulation for instruction, visualization for diagnosis, and surgical simulation for treatment planning and rehearsal. Infrastructure, methods and applications are discussed in this chapter. The most complex and challenging applications, those that show the greatest promise of significantly changing the practice of medical research or treatment, require an intimate and immediate union of image and model with real-world, real-time data.

  • Virtual Reality for Health Care

    The basis for the virtual reality (VR) idea is that a computer can synthesise a three-dimensional (3-D) graphical environment from numerical data. Using visual and auditory output devices, the human operator can experience the environment as if it were a part of the world. This computer-generated world may be either a model of a real-world object, such as a house; or an abstract world that does not exist in a real sense but is understood by humans, such as a chemical molecule or a representation of a set of data; or it might be in a completely imaginary science fiction world. Furthermore, because input devices sense the operator's reactions and motions, the operator can modify the synthetic environment, creating the illusion of interacting with and thus being immersed within the environment. The following topics are covered here: VR and telepresence; Definitions; Technology overview; Market analysis; Virtual reality in health care; and Telemedicine.

  • Virtual Reality and Computer Simulation

    This chapter contains sections titled:IntroductionBackground: The Technology and its ApplicationsVirtuality and RealityRepresentation and Simulation: Ethical IssuesBehavior in Virtual Environments: Ethical IssuesThe Ethics of Computer GamesVirtual Reality, Simulation, and Professional EthicsReferences

  • Medical Applications of Virtual Reality in Japan

    Japan is famous as a major power of video games and as an electronically developed industrial country. However, the present Japanese situation of academic research on virtual reality (VR) is not well known because of the linguistic barrier. In this chapter, VR research in Japan and its medical applications is surveyed and the future view of Japanese activities in these fields is discussed. Trends in medical applications are discussed. Specific research such as in computer surgery, training, education, remote medicine, psychotherapy and rehabilitation are detailed.

  • Virtual Reality Laboratory for Medical Applications

    Virtual reality (VR) is the term given to a new human computer interface, and illusion is the key component. The aim is to give the user the illusion of an alternative reality. Immersive environments are often named in this context and describe VR systems that are intended to block out the real world and help the user become part of the virtual scene. Building virtual environments (VEs) requires the understanding not only of the existing technical components but also of the pattern and behavior of human perception. The aim of this chapter is to give a description of a VR laboratory in the context of medical applications. In 1990, the author started to set up a test bed for three-dimensional (3-D) input and output devices at the Technical University of Berlin. This led to the installation of a VR laboratory, which, was moved into the medical environment at the University Hospital Benjamin Franklin (UKBF), as part of the Free University of Berlin. To set up the VR laboratory, user and task analyses must be performed. A VR system is composed of different components, which are explained and described by example. The individual components must be carefully selected, depending on their functionality and their use within the medical environment. The devices need to be regarded from the point of view of their technical description and their limitations. The advantages of the individual components, however, are not the only criteria for choosing them, because the interrelation with the system must also be taken into account. The costs are often an important limiting factor for influencing the choice of a particular device.

  • Sound in Virtual Reality

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  • Virtual Reality and MedicineChallenges for the TwentyFirst Century

    Robert Mann first proposed a virtual reality (VR) system for medical applications in 1965. His initial ideas were for a rehabilitation application for virtual reality. Later, his vision was to develop a system that would allow surgeons to test out multiple operations for a given orthopedic problem. Then in a virtual environment (VE), the clock could be speeded up to predict the future outcome of different surgical approaches. In effect, the patient could leave the operating table, go through rehabilitation, and then return for evaluation. The surgeon could then pick the best choice for the real operation. This approach would need a model that was not only patient specific but also accurate in terms of the deformity and its response to treatment over time. This is the ultimate goal for the twenty-first century for a VR system in surgery. It is difficult to create a model of the human body that is realistic enough to accurately portray a surgical mission that is planned. The interface tools that are presently available are much more advanced than the ones discussed here that were available to NASA in the 1980s; however, without a true model to interact with they are unable to provide the realism for surgical education and training that is needed. Present cadaver laboratories and training through hands-on experience provide the majority of medical education today in surgery. It is unlikely that present VR simulators will change this without a significant improvements in the models. Most of the author's work has been directed at creating digital models of humans. Some of this work is reviewed and what needs to be done is emphasized, rather than focus on what has already been accomplished. Systems are presently available for many medical training applications, including microsurgery, urology, general surgery, heart surgery, vascular surgery, eye surgery, otolaryngology, military wound d?bridement, and obstetrics. Ultimately these systems will be able to provide teaching at a distance for telemedicine and telesurgery. The goal of this chapter is to better define where is needed to make improvements in the human body models for all of these systems. Most of these systems assume normal tissue properties and do not address the response over time of the tissues to the disease state, to the surgical intervention, or to the healing process. The pathologic state of tissues and the tissue's response to interventions over time should be the next grand challenge in virtual reality and medicine.



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