Radiometer

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A radiometer is a device for measuring the radiant flux (power) of electromagnetic radiation. (Wikipedia.org)






Conferences related to Radiometer

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Oceans 2020 MTS/IEEE GULF COAST

To promote awareness, understanding, advancement and application of ocean engineering and marine technology. This includes all aspects of science, engineering, and technology that address research, development, and operations pertaining to all bodies of water. This includes the creation of new capabilities and technologies from concept design through prototypes, testing, and operational systems to sense, explore, understand, develop, use, and responsibly manage natural resources.

  • OCEANS 2018 MTS/IEEE Charleston

    Ocean, coastal, and atmospheric science and technology advances and applications

  • OCEANS 2017 - Anchorage

    Papers on ocean technology, exhibits from ocean equipment and service suppliers, student posters and student poster competition, tutorials on ocean technology, workshops and town meetings on policy and governmental process.

  • OCEANS 2016

    The Marine Technology Scociety and the Oceanic Engineering Society of the IEEE cosponor a joint annual conference and exposition on ocean science, engineering, and policy. The OCEANS conference covers four days. One day for tutorials and three for approx. 500 technical papers and 150 -200 exhibits.

  • OCEANS 2015

    The Marine Technology Scociety and the Oceanic Engineering Society of the IEEE cosponor a joint annual conference and exposition on ocean science, engineering, and policy. The OCEANS conference covers four days. One day for tutorials and three for approx. 450 technical papers and 150-200 exhibits.

  • OCEANS 2014

    The OCEANS conference covers four days. One day for tutorials and three for approx. 450 technical papers and 150-200 exhibits.

  • OCEANS 2013

    Three days of 8-10 tracks of technical sessions (400-450 papers) and concurent exhibition (150-250 exhibitors)

  • OCEANS 2012

    Ocean related technology. Tutorials and three days of technical sessions and exhibits. 8-12 parallel technical tracks.

  • OCEANS 2011

    The Marine Technology Society and the Oceanic Engineering Scociety of the IEEE cosponsor a joint annual conference and exposition on ocean science engineering, and policy.

  • OCEANS 2010

    The Marine Technology Society and the Oceanic Engineering Scociety of the IEEE cosponsor a joint annual conference and exposition on ocean science engineering, and policy.

  • OCEANS 2009

  • OCEANS 2008

    The Marine Technology Society (MTS) and the Oceanic Engineering Society (OES) of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) cosponsor a joint conference and exposition on ocean science, engineering, education, and policy. Held annually in the fall, it has become a focal point for the ocean and marine community to meet, learn, and exhibit products and services. The conference includes technical sessions, workshops, student poster sessions, job fairs, tutorials and a large exhibit.

  • OCEANS 2007

  • OCEANS 2006

  • OCEANS 2005

  • OCEANS 2004

  • OCEANS 2003

  • OCEANS 2002

  • OCEANS 2001

  • OCEANS 2000

  • OCEANS '99

  • OCEANS '98

  • OCEANS '97

  • OCEANS '96


2019 44th International Conference on Infrared, Millimeter, and Terahertz Waves (IRMMW-THz)

Science, technology and applications spanning the millimeter-waves, terahertz and infrared spectral regions


2019 IEEE International Conference on Image Processing (ICIP)

The International Conference on Image Processing (ICIP), sponsored by the IEEE SignalProcessing Society, is the premier forum for the presentation of technological advances andresearch results in the fields of theoretical, experimental, and applied image and videoprocessing. ICIP 2019, the 26th in the series that has been held annually since 1994, bringstogether leading engineers and scientists in image and video processing from around the world.


2019 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS)

International Geosicence and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS) is the annual conference sponsored by the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society (IEEE GRSS), which is also the flagship event of the society. The topics of IGARSS cover a wide variety of the research on the theory, techniques, and applications of remote sensing in geoscience, which includes: the fundamentals of the interactions electromagnetic waves with environment and target to be observed; the techniques and implementation of remote sensing for imaging and sounding; the analysis, processing and information technology of remote sensing data; the applications of remote sensing in different aspects of earth science; the missions and projects of earth observation satellites and airborne and ground based campaigns. The theme of IGARSS 2019 is “Enviroment and Disasters”, and some emphases will be given on related special topics.


2019 IEEE International Symposium on Antennas and Propagation and USNC-URSI Radio Science Meeting

The conference is intended to provide an international forum for the exchange of information on state-of-the-art research in antennas, propagation, electromagnetics, and radio science.


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Periodicals related to Radiometer

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Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine, IEEE

The IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine publishes articles concerned with the various aspects of systems for space, air, ocean, or ground environments.


Antennas and Propagation, IEEE Transactions on

Experimental and theoretical advances in antennas including design and development, and in the propagation of electromagnetic waves including scattering, diffraction and interaction with continuous media; and applications pertinent to antennas and propagation, such as remote sensing, applied optics, and millimeter and submillimeter wave techniques.


Antennas and Wireless Propagation Letters, IEEE

IEEE Antennas and Wireless Propagation Letters (AWP Letters) will be devoted to the rapid electronic publication of short manuscripts in the technical areas of Antennas and Wireless Propagation.


Applied Superconductivity, IEEE Transactions on

Contains articles on the applications and other relevant technology. Electronic applications include analog and digital circuits employing thin films and active devices such as Josephson junctions. Power applications include magnet design as well asmotors, generators, and power transmission


Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Broad coverage of concepts and methods of the physical and engineering sciences applied in biology and medicine, ranging from formalized mathematical theory through experimental science and technological development to practical clinical applications.


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Most published Xplore authors for Radiometer

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Xplore Articles related to Radiometer

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Millimeter & sub-millimeter wave radiometer instruments for the next generation of polar orbiting meteorological satellites — MetOp-SG

2014 39th International Conference on Infrared, Millimeter, and Terahertz waves (IRMMW-THz), 2014

We present here the latest Schottky based technology developments for the next generation of microwave, millimeter and sub-millimeter wave radiometer instruments in the framework of the joint ESA/EUMETSAT space mission - MetOp- SG. It includes the prototyping of state-of-the-art Schottky diode based mixers and multipliers and their reliability assessment for this type of long life operational space missions.


Analysis of the performance of the Microwave Imager radiometer for MetOp Second Generation

2012 12th Specialist Meeting on Microwave Radiometry and Remote Sensing of the Environment (MicroRad), 2012

In the framework of the Phase A study for MetOp Second Generation mission (MetOp-SG), CORISTA developed an instrument performance model for MicroWave Imager (MWI) instrument that is currently studied for MetOp-SG. MWI is a conically scanning microwave radiometer, consisting of 28 channels and covering frequency range from 18 GHz up to 183 GHz. The corresponding algorithms have been implemented by ...


MIRAS reference radiometer: a fully polarimetric noise injection radiometer

IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, 2005

A prototype reference radiometer for the Microwave Imaging Radiometer Using Aperture Synthesis (MIRAS) instrument of the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity satellite has been developed. The reference radiometer is an L-band fully polarimetric noise injection radiometer (NIR). The main purposes of the NIR are: 1) to provide precise measurement of the average fully polarimetric brightness temperature scene for absolute calibration ...


Calibration of the ground-based microwave radiometer in monitoring soil moisture

2007 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium, 2007

The configurations and specifications of the newly- bought Microwave Radiometer in Beijing Normal Uniersity, China, RPG-8CH-DP, is introduced. The calibration method for monitoring soil moisture is described in this paper.


A Microbolometer Airborne Calibrated Infrared Radiometer: The Ball Experimental Sea Surface Temperature (BESST) Radiometer

IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, 2014

A calibrated radiometer has been developed to enable the collection of accurate infrared measurements of sea surface temperature (SST) from unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). A key feature of this instrument is that in situ calibration is achieved with two built-in blackbodies (BBs). The instrument is designed so that the 2-D microbolometer array produces infrared images incremented as the aircraft travels, ...


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Educational Resources on Radiometer

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IEEE.tv Videos

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IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Millimeter & sub-millimeter wave radiometer instruments for the next generation of polar orbiting meteorological satellites — MetOp-SG

    We present here the latest Schottky based technology developments for the next generation of microwave, millimeter and sub-millimeter wave radiometer instruments in the framework of the joint ESA/EUMETSAT space mission - MetOp- SG. It includes the prototyping of state-of-the-art Schottky diode based mixers and multipliers and their reliability assessment for this type of long life operational space missions.

  • Analysis of the performance of the Microwave Imager radiometer for MetOp Second Generation

    In the framework of the Phase A study for MetOp Second Generation mission (MetOp-SG), CORISTA developed an instrument performance model for MicroWave Imager (MWI) instrument that is currently studied for MetOp-SG. MWI is a conically scanning microwave radiometer, consisting of 28 channels and covering frequency range from 18 GHz up to 183 GHz. The corresponding algorithms have been implemented by means of dedicated software aimed to analyze the performance of the MWI. An analysis tool was developed for the instrument channels as well as for the overall system performance parameters. The software tool was developed in MatLab language.

  • MIRAS reference radiometer: a fully polarimetric noise injection radiometer

    A prototype reference radiometer for the Microwave Imaging Radiometer Using Aperture Synthesis (MIRAS) instrument of the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity satellite has been developed. The reference radiometer is an L-band fully polarimetric noise injection radiometer (NIR). The main purposes of the NIR are: 1) to provide precise measurement of the average fully polarimetric brightness temperature scene for absolute calibration of the MIRAS image map and 2) to measure the noise temperature level of the noise distribution network of the MIRAS for individual receiver calibration. The performance of the NIR is a decisive factor of the MIRAS performance. In this paper we present the operation principles and calibration procedures of the NIR, a measurement technique called blind correlation making measurements of full Stokes vector possible with the noise injection method, and finally experimental results verifying certain aspects of the design.

  • Calibration of the ground-based microwave radiometer in monitoring soil moisture

    The configurations and specifications of the newly- bought Microwave Radiometer in Beijing Normal Uniersity, China, RPG-8CH-DP, is introduced. The calibration method for monitoring soil moisture is described in this paper.

  • A Microbolometer Airborne Calibrated Infrared Radiometer: The Ball Experimental Sea Surface Temperature (BESST) Radiometer

    A calibrated radiometer has been developed to enable the collection of accurate infrared measurements of sea surface temperature (SST) from unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). A key feature of this instrument is that in situ calibration is achieved with two built-in blackbodies (BBs). The instrument is designed so that the 2-D microbolometer array produces infrared images incremented as the aircraft travels, resulting in a well-calibrated strip of SST. Designed to be carried by medium-class UAVs, the Ball Experimental SST (BESST) instrument has been also successfully flown on manned aircraft. A recent intercalibration of BESST was carried out at the University of Miami using their National Institute of Standards and Technology traceable water- bath BB and a Fourier transform interferometer, the Marine-Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (M-AERI). The characterization of the BESST instrument with the Miami BB demonstrates the linearity and precision of the response of the microbolometer-based radiometer. Coincident measurements of SST from a nearby pier clearly demonstrated the excellent performance of the BESST instrument with a mean SST equal to that of the M-AERI and an RMS of 0.14 K very close to the microbolometer's advertised precision of 0.1 K. Cold calibration was not possible in Miami due to condensation, but a Ball BB was characterized relative to the Miami water-bath BB, and calibrations were made in Boulder at lower temperatures than were possible in Miami. The BESST instrument's performance remained linear, and the mean and RMS values did not change. UAV flights were conducted in summer/fall of 2013 over the Alaskan Arctic.

  • A compact airborne G-band (183 GHz) water Vapor Radiometer and retrievals of liquid cloud parameters from coincident radiometer and millimeter wave radar measurements

    ProSensing Inc. has developed a G-band (183 GHz, 1.5 mm wavelength) water Vapor Radiometer (GVR) for measuring low concentrations of atmospheric water vapor and liquid water. Using four double sideband receiver channels, the instrument measures brightness temperature at 183.31 +-1, +-3, +-7 and +-14 GHz . An airborne version of the instrument, packaged and wired to operate from a standard PMS probe canister, was successfully tested onboard the National Research Council of Canada Convair-580 aircraft during the Canadian CloudSat and CALIPSO validation flights (C3VP) through the winter of 2006-07. The Zenith G-band radiometer brightness temperature data collected with the GVR were complemented with co-located cloud reflectivity measurements with the NRC W and X-band (NAWX) radar system and in situ probes. By flying the aircraft in a stepped and porpoising ascent/descent patterns, liquid cloud water content was estimated from the GVR retrieved liquid water path. The effective radius and number density of liquid clouds were then estimated by combining the liquid water content with the W-band radar reflectivity factor (Z) and by applying a small correction factor, based on the characteristic drop size distribution shape of the observed cloud.

  • A novel microwave radiometer for assessment of atmospheric propagation conditions for 10 and 90 GHz frequency bands

    In order to quantify atmospheric perturbations on satellite signals a new ground based ultra stable microwave radiometer is developed. In addition to several K- and V-band channels two further Ku- and W-band channels are implemented. This frequency combination provides sensitivity towards atmospheric water vapour and oxygen, as well as to rain and cloud droplets. To perform high stable measurements, the radiometer is equipped by a continuous calibration method using a Dicke switch and a noise diode. This yields to radiometer stability for integration times up to 2000 seconds.

  • Validation of SMAP radiometer extreme wind speed data product with rapid scatterometer and stepped frequency microwave radiometer

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission was launched January 31st, 2015. It is designed to measure the soil moisture over land using a combined active / passive L-band system. Due to the Aquarius mission, L-band model functions for ocean winds and salinity are already mature and may be directly applied to the SMAP mission. In contrast to Aquarius, the higher resolution and scanning geometry of SMAP allows for wide-swath ocean winds and salinities to be retrieved. We have found that the SMAP radiometer displays sensitivity all the way up to the most extreme wind speeds, possibly as high as 70 m/s, far beyond what is capable with typical C and Ku-band ocean wind scatterometers. In this work we use the Rapid Scatterometer (RapidScat) and Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR) to further validate these SMAP radiometer-only high-wind speed retrievals.

  • Microwave Radiometer (MWR) oceanic integrated rain rate algorithm for Aquarius/SAC-D

    The Microwave Radiometer (MWR) flying on the Aquarius/SAC-D mission is a Dicke radiometer operating at 23.8 and 36.5 GHz that is developed by the Argentina Space Agency CONAE. This instrument will complement Aquarius (NASA's L-band radiometer/scatterometer) by providing simultaneous spatially collocated environmental measurements such as oceanic wind speed and rain rate. This paper describes the development of the pre-launch MWR rain rate algorithm using simulated MWR brightness temperatures from actual WindSat radiometer observations. WindSat provides high spatial resolution brightness temperatures that are spatially averaged to simulate the resolution of MWR. Also WindSat provides retrieved environmental parameters (EDR's), which includes rain rate for developing the statistical regression algorithm. Examples of simulated MWR rain retrievals are presented.

  • Radiometer Calibration Using Colocated GPS Radio Occultation Measurements

    We present a new high-fidelity method of calibrating a cross-track scanning microwave radiometer using Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (GPSRO) measurements. The radiometer and GPSRO receiver periodically observe the same volume of atmosphere near the Earth's limb, and these overlapping measurements are used to calibrate the radiometer. Performance analyses show that absolute calibration accuracy better than 0.25 K is achievable for temperature sounding channels in the 50-60-GHz band for a total-power radiometer using a weakly coupled noise diode for frequent calibration and proximal GPSRO measurements for infrequent (approximately daily) calibration. The method requires GPSRO penetration depth only down to the stratosphere, thus permitting the use of a relatively small GPS antenna. Furthermore, only coarse spacecraft angular knowledge (approximately one degree rms) is required for the technique, as more precise angular knowledge can be retrieved directly from the combined radiometer and GPSRO data, assuming that the radiometer angular sampling is uniform. These features make the technique particularly well suited for implementation on a low-cost CubeSat hosting both radiometer and GPSRO receiver systems on the same spacecraft. We describe a validation platform for this calibration method, the Microwave Radiometer Technology Acceleration (MiRaTA) CubeSat, currently in development for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Science Technology Office. MiRaTA will fly a multiband radiometer and the Compact TEC/Atmosphere GPS Sensor in 2015.



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