Conferences related to Visualization

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2018 13th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

HRI is a highly selective annual conference that showcases the very best research and thinking in human-robot interaction. HRI is inherently interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary, reflecting work from researchersin robotics, psychology, cognitive science, HCI, human factors, artificial intelligence, organizational behavior,anthropology, and many other fields.

  • 2019 14th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    HRI is a highly selective annual conference that showcases the very best research and thinking in human-robot interaction. HRI is inherently interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary, reflecting work from researchers in robotics, psychology, cognitive science, HCI, human factors, artificial intelligence, organizational behavior, anthropology, and many other fields.

  • 2017 12th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    The conference serves as the primary annual meeting for researchers in the field of human-robot interaction. The event will include a main papers track and additional sessions for posters, demos, and exhibits. Additionally, the conference program will include a full day of workshops and tutorials running in parallel.

  • 2016 11th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    This conference focuses on the interaction between humans and robots.

  • 2015 10th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    HRI is a single -track, highly selective annual conference that showcases the very bestresearch and thinking in human -robot interaction. HRI is inherently interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary,reflecting work from researchers in robotics, psychology, cognitive science, HCI, human factors, artificialintelligence, organizational behavior, anthropology, and many other fields.

  • 2014 9th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    HRI is a highly selective annual conference that showcases the very best research and thinking in human -robot interaction. HRI is inherently interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary, reflecting work from researchers in robotics, psychology, cognitive science, HCI, human factors, artificial intelligence, organizational behavior, anthropology, and many other fields.

  • 2013 8th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    HRI is a single -track, highly selective annual conference that showcases the very best research and thinking in human-robot interaction. HRI is inherently interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary, reflecting work from researchers in robotics, psychology, cognitive science, HCI, human factors, artificial intelligence, organizational behavior, anthropology, and many other fields.

  • 2012 7th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    HRI is a single-track, highly selective annual conference that showcases the very best research and thinking in human-robot interaction. HRI is inherently interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary, reflecting work from researchers in robotics, psychology, cognitive science, HCI, human factors, artificial intelligence, organizational behavior, anthropology, and many other fields.

  • 2011 6th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    Robot companions Lifelike robots Assistive (health & personal care) robotics Remote robots Mixed initiative interaction Multi-modal interaction Long-term interaction with robots Awareness and monitoring of humans Task allocation and coordination Autonomy and trust Robot-team learning User studies of HRI Experiments on HRI collaboration Ethnography and field studies HRI software architectures HRI foundations Metrics for teamwork HRI group dynamics.

  • 2010 5th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    TOPICS: Robot companions, Lifelike robots, Assistive (health & personal care) robotics, Remote robots, Mixed initiative interaction, Multi-modal interaction, Long-term interaction with robots, Awareness and monitoring of humans, Task allocation and coordination, Autonomy and trust, Robot-team learning, User studies of HRI, Experiments on HRI collaboration, Ethnography and field studies, HRI software architectures

  • 2009 4th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    * Robot companions * Lifelike robots * Assistive (health & personal care) robotics * Remote robots * Mixed initiative interaction * Multi-modal interaction * Long-term interaction with robots * Awareness and monitoring of humans * Task allocation and coordination * Autonomy and trust * Robot-team learning * User studies of HRI * Experiments on HRI collaboration * Ethnography and field studies * HRI software architectures

  • 2008 3rd ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    Robot companions Lifelike robots Assistive (health & personal care) robotics Remote robots Mixed initiative interaction Multi-modal interaction Long-term interaction with robots Awareness and monitoring of humans Task allocation and coordination Autonomy and trust Robot-team learning User studies of HRI Experiments on HRI collaboration Ethnography and field studies HRI software architectures HRI foundations Metrics for teamwork HRI group dynamics Individual vs. group HRI

  • 2007 2nd Annual Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)


2018 15th IEEE Annual Consumer Communications & Networking Conference (CCNC)

IEEE CCNC 2018 will present the latest developments and technical solutions in the areas of home networking, consumer networking, enabling technologies (such as middleware) and novel applications and services. The conference will include a peer-reviewed program of technical sessions, special sessions, business application sessions, tutorials, and demonstration sessions


2018 25th IEEE International Conference on Image Processing (ICIP)

The International Conference on Image Processing (ICIP), sponsored by the IEEE Signal Processing Society, is the premier forum for the presentation of technological advances and research results in the fields of theoretical, experimental, and applied image and video processing. ICIP 2018, the 25th in the series that has been held annually since 1994, brings together leading engineers and scientists in image and video processing from around the world.


2018 IEEE 12th International Conference on Semantic Computing (ICSC)

Topics for submission include but are not limited to:Analytics (from contents to semantics) Structured data image and video audio and speech big data natural language deep learningDescription and Integration Semantics description languages ontology integration interoperabilityUse of Semantics in IT Applications Multimedia IoT cloud computing SDN wearable computing mobile computing search engines question answering robotics web service security and privacyUse of Semantics in Interdisciplinary Applications biomedicine healthcare manufacturing engineering education finance entertainment business science humanityInterface Natural language multi-modal

  • 2017 IEEE 11th International Conference on Semantic Computing (ICSC)

    Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:• Analytics (from contents to semantics): Structured data, image and video, audio and speech, big data, natural language, deep learning• Description and Integration: Semantics description languages, ontology integration, interoperability• Use of Semantics in IT Applications: Multimedia, IoT, cloud computing, SDN, wearable computing, mobile computing, search engines, question answering, web services, security and privacy• Use of Semantics in Interdisciplinary Applications such as biomedicine, healthcare, manufacturing, engineering, education, finance, entertainment, business, science, humanity• Interfaces: Natural language, multi-modal

  • 2016 IEEE Tenth International Conference on Semantic Computing (ICSC)

    Semantic Computing (SC) is Computing based on Semantics (“meaning”, "context", “intention”). It addresses all types of resource including data, document, tool, device, process and people. The scope of SC includes analytics, semantics description languages and integration, interfaces, and applications including biomed, IoT, cloud computing, SDN,wearable computing, context awareness, mobile computing, search engines, question answering, big data, multimedia, and services.

  • 2015 IEEE International Conference on Semantic Computing (ICSC)

    Semantics based AnalysisNatural language processingImage and video analysisAudio, music and speech analysisData and web miningBehavior of software, systems, and networksServices and networksSecurityPrivacyAnalysis of social networksSemantic IntegrationMetadata and other description languagesDatabase schema integrationOntology integrationInteroperability and service integrationSemantic programming languages and software engineeringSemantic system design and synthesisApplications using SemanticsBig DataSearch engines and question answeringSemantic web servicesContent-based multimedia retrieval and editingContext-aware networks of sensors, devices and applicationsDevices and applicationsDigital library applicationsMachine translationMusic description and meta-creationMedicine and BiologyGIS systems and architectureSemantic InterfacesNatural language interfacesMultimodal interfaces and mediation technologyHuman centered computing

  • 2014 IEEE International Conference on Semantic Computing (ICSC)

    Semantics based Analysis:Natural language processing,Image and video analysis, Audio, music and speech analysis, Data and web mining,Behavior of software, services and networks, Services and networks,Security,Privacy,Analysis of social networksSemantic Integration,Metadata and other description languages,Database schema integration,Ontology integration,Interoperability and service integration,Semantic programming languages and software engineering,Semantic system design and synthesisApplications using Semantics,Search engines and question answering,Semantic web services,Content-based multimedia retrieval and editing,Context-aware networks of sensors, devices and applications,Digital library applications,Machine translation,Music description and meta-creation,Medicine and Biology,GIS systems and architectureSemantic Interfaces,Natural language interfaces,Multimodal interfaces and mediation technology,Human centered computing

  • 2013 IEEE Seventh International Conference on Semantic Computing (ICSC)

    Semantics based Analysis

  • 2012 IEEE Sixth International Conference on Semantic Computing (ICSC)

    Natural language processing Image and video analysis Audio and speech analysis Data and web mining Behavior of software, services and networks Security Metadata and other description languages Ontology integration Interoperability and service integration Search engines and question answering Semantic web services Content-based multimedia retrieval and editing Context-aware networks of sensors, devices and applications Machine translation Creative art description Medicine and biology Semantic programming languages and software engineering System design and synthesis GIS

  • 2011 IEEE Fifth International Conference on Semantic Computing (ICSC)

    Semantics based Analysis Natural language processing Image and video analysis Audio and speech analysis Data and web mining Behavior of software, services and networks Security Semantic Integration Metadata and other description languages Ontology integration Interoperability and service integration Applications using Semantics Search engines and question answering Semantic web services Content-based multimedia retrieval and editing Context-aware networks of sensors, devices and applications Machine translation Creative art description Medicine and biology Semantic programming languages and software engineering System design and synthesis GIS Semantic Interfaces Natural language interfaces Multimodal interfaces Human centered computing

  • 2010 IEEE Fourth International Conference on Semantic Computing (ICSC)

    The field of Semantic Computing addresses the derivation and matching of the semantics of computational content to that of naturally expressed user intentions in order to retrieve, manage, manipulate or even create content, where "content" maybe anything including video, audio, text, processes, services, hardware, networks, etc.

  • 2009 IEEE Third International Conference on Semantic Computing (ICSC)

    ANALYSIS AND UNDERSTANDING OF CONTENT Natural-language processing Image and video analysis Audio and speech analysis Analysis of structured and semi-structured data Analysis of behavior of software, services, and networks INTEGRATION OF MULTIPLE SEMANTIC REPRESENTATIONS Database schema integration Ontology integration Interoperability and Service Integration SEMANTIC INTERFACES Natural-Language Interface Multimodal Interfaces APPLICATIONS Semantic Web and other search technologies Quest

  • 2008 Second IEEE International Conference on Semantic Computing (ICSC)

    The field of Semantic Computing (SC) brings together those disciplines concerned with connecting the (often vaguely-formulated) intentions of humans with computational content. This connection can go both ways: retrieving, using and manipulating existing content according to user's goals ("do what the user means"); and creating, rearranging, and managing content that matches the author's intentions ("do what the author means").

  • 2007 First IEEE International Conference on Semantic Computing (ICSC)


2018 IEEE 18th International Conference on Bioinformatics and Bioengineering (BIBE)

The series of BIBE Conferences was initiated in 2000 and is the first of its kind in IEEE inspiringothers to follow its path. The 18th annual IEEE International Conference on Bioinformatics andBioengineering aims at building synergy between Bioinformatics and Bioengineering, twocomplementary disciplines that hold great promise for the advancement of research anddevelopment in complex medical and biological systems, agriculture, environment, publichealth, drug design. Research and development in these two areas are impacting the scienceand technology in fields such as medicine, food production, forensics, etc. by advancingfundamental concepts in molecular biology, by helping us understand living organisms atmultiple levels, by developing innovative implants and bio-prosthetics, and by improving toolsand techniques for the detection, prevention and treatment of diseases.


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Periodicals related to Visualization

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Antennas and Propagation, IEEE Transactions on

Experimental and theoretical advances in antennas including design and development, and in the propagation of electromagnetic waves including scattering, diffraction and interaction with continuous media; and applications pertinent to antennas and propagation, such as remote sensing, applied optics, and millimeter and submillimeter wave techniques.


Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Broad coverage of concepts and methods of the physical and engineering sciences applied in biology and medicine, ranging from formalized mathematical theory through experimental science and technological development to practical clinical applications.


Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, IEEE/ACM Transactions on

Specific topics of interest include, but are not limited to, sequence analysis, comparison and alignment methods; motif, gene and signal recognition; molecular evolution; phylogenetics and phylogenomics; determination or prediction of the structure of RNA and Protein in two and three dimensions; DNA twisting and folding; gene expression and gene regulatory networks; deduction of metabolic pathways; micro-array design and analysis; proteomics; ...


Computer

Computer, the flagship publication of the IEEE Computer Society, publishes peer-reviewed technical content that covers all aspects of computer science, computer engineering, technology, and applications. Computer is a resource that practitioners, researchers, and managers can rely on to provide timely information about current research developments, trends, best practices, and changes in the profession.


Computer Graphics and Applications, IEEE

IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications (CG&A) bridges the theory and practice of computer graphics. From specific algorithms to full system implementations, CG&A offers a strong combination of peer-reviewed feature articles and refereed departments, including news and product announcements. Special Applications sidebars relate research stories to commercial development. Cover stories focus on creative applications of the technology by an artist or ...


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Most published Xplore authors for Visualization

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Xplore Articles related to Visualization

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An Enhanced Visualization Process Model for Incremental Visualization

[{u'author_order': 1, u'affiliation': u'Fraunhofer IGD Rostock, Rostock, Germany', u'full_name': u'Hans-J\xf6rg Schulz'}, {u'author_order': 2, u'affiliation': u'Sapienza University of Rome, Italy', u'full_name': u'Marco Angelini'}, {u'author_order': 3, u'affiliation': u'Sapienza University of Rome, Italy', u'full_name': u'Giuseppe Santucci'}, {u'author_order': 4, u'affiliation': u'University of Rostock, Germany', u'full_name': u'Heidrun Schumann'}] IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics, 2016

With today's technical possibilities, a stable visualization scenario can no longer be assumed as a matter of course, as underlying data and targeted display setup are much more in flux than in traditional scenarios. Incremental visualization approaches are a means to address this challenge, as they permit the user to interact with, steer, and change the visualization at intermediate time ...


Glyph-Based Comparative Visualization for Diffusion Tensor Fields

[{u'author_order': 1, u'affiliation': u'Computer Graphics and Visualization Group at Delft University of Technology', u'full_name': u'Changgong Zhang'}, {u'author_order': 2, u'affiliation': u'Visualization and Medical Image Analysis Group at University of Bonn', u'full_name': u'Thomas Schultz'}, {u'author_order': 3, u'affiliation': u'Visualization Group at University of Magdeburg', u'full_name': u'Kai Lawonn'}, {u'author_order': 4, u'affiliation': u'Computer Graphics and Visualization Group at Delft University of Technology', u'full_name': u'Elmar Eisemann'}, {u'author_order': 5, u'affiliation': u'Computer Graphics and Visualization Group at Delft University of Technology', u'full_name': u'Anna Vilanova'}] IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics, 2016

Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) is a magnetic resonance imaging modality that enables the in-vivo reconstruction and visualization of fibrous structures. To inspect the local and individual diffusion tensors, glyph-based visualizations are commonly used since they are able to effectively convey full aspects of the diffusion tensor. For several applications it is necessary to compare tensor fields, e.g., to study the ...


Explanatory and illustrative visualization of special and general relativity

[{u'author_order': 1, u'affiliation': u'Graphics, Visualization, & Usability Lab., Simon Fraser Univ., Burnaby, BC, Canada', u'full_name': u'D. Weiskopf'}, {u'author_order': 2, u'full_name': u'M. Borchers'}, {u'author_order': 3, u'full_name': u'T. Ertl'}, {u'author_order': 4, u'full_name': u'M. Falk'}, {u'author_order': 5, u'full_name': u'O. Fechtig'}, {u'author_order': 6, u'full_name': u'R. Frank'}, {u'author_order': 7, u'full_name': u'F. Grave'}, {u'author_order': 8, u'full_name': u'A. King'}, {u'author_order': 9, u'full_name': u'U. Kraus'}, {u'author_order': 10, u'full_name': u'T. Muller'}, {u'author_order': 11, u'full_name': u'H.-P. Nollert'}, {u'author_order': 12, u'full_name': u'I.R. Mendez'}, {u'author_order': 13, u'full_name': u'H. Ruder'}, {u'author_order': 14, u'full_name': u'T. Schafhitzel'}, {u'author_order': 15, u'full_name': u'S. Schar'}, {u'author_order': 16, u'full_name': u'C. Zahn'}, {u'author_order': 17, u'full_name': u'M. Zatloukal'}] IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics, 2006

This paper describes methods for explanatory and illustrative visualizations used to communicate aspects of Einstein's theories of special and general relativity, their geometric structure, and of the related fields of cosmology and astrophysics. Our illustrations target a general audience of laypersons interested in relativity. We discuss visualization strategies, motivated by physics education and the didactics of mathematics, and describe what ...


Noise-Based Volume Rendering for the Visualization of Multivariate Volumetric Data

[{u'author_order': 1, u'affiliation': u'Graz University of Technology', u'full_name': u'Rostislav Khlebnikov'}, {u'author_order': 2, u'affiliation': u'Imperial College London', u'full_name': u'Bernhard Kainz'}, {u'author_order': 3, u'affiliation': u'Graz University of Technology', u'full_name': u'Markus Steinberger'}, {u'author_order': 4, u'affiliation': u'Graz University of Technology', u'full_name': u'Dieter Schmalstieg'}] IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics, 2013

Analysis of multivariate data is of great importance in many scientific disciplines. However, visualization of 3D spatially-fixed multivariate volumetric data is a very challenging task. In this paper we present a method that allows simultaneous real-time visualization of multivariate data. We redistribute the opacity within a voxel to improve the readability of the color defined by a regular transfer function, ...


Multiscale Time Activity Data Exploration via Temporal Clustering Visualization Spreadsheet

[{u'author_order': 1, u'affiliation': u'Ohio State University, Columbus', u'full_name': u'Jonathan Woodring'}, {u'author_order': 2, u'affiliation': u'The Ohio State University, Columbus', u'full_name': u'Han-Wei Shen'}] IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics, 2009

Time-varying data is usually explored by animation or arrays of static images. Neither is particularly effective for classifying data by different temporal activities. Important temporal trends can be missed due to the lack of ability to find them with current visualization methods. In this paper, we propose a method to explore data at different temporal resolutions to discover and highlight ...


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Educational Resources on Visualization

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eLearning

No eLearning Articles are currently tagged "Visualization"

IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Image-Based Visualization: Interactive Multidimensional Data Exploration

    Our society has entered a data-driven era, one in which not only are enormous amounts of data being generated daily but there are also growing expectations placed on the analysis of this data. Some data have become simply too large to be displayed and some have too short a lifespan to be handled properly with classical visualization or analysis methods. In order to address these issues, this book explores the potential solutions where we not only visualize data, but also allow users to be able to interact with it. Therefore, this book will focus on two main topics: large dataset visualization and interaction. Graphic cards and their image processing power can leverage large data visualization but they can also be of great interest to support interaction. Therefore, this book will show how to take advantage of graphic card computation power with techniques called GPGPUs (general-purpose computing on graphics processing units). As specific examples, this book details GPGPU usages to produce fast enough visualization to be interactive with improved brushing techniques, fast animations between different data representations, and view simplifications (i.e. static and dynamic bundling techniques). Since data storage and memory limitation is less and less of an issue, we will also present techniques to reduce computation time by using memory as a new tool to solve computationally challenging problems. We will investigate innovative data processing techniques: while classical algorithms are expressed in data space (e.g. computation on geographic locations), we will express them in graphic space (e.g., raster map like a screen composed of pixels). This consists of two steps: (1) a data representation is built using straightforward visualization techniques; and (2) the resulting image undergoes purely graphical transformations using image processing techniques. This type of technique is called image-based visualization. The goal of this book is to explore new computing techniques using image-based techniques to provide efficient visualizations and user interfaces for the exploration of large datasets. This book concentrates on the areas of information visualization, visual analytics, computer graphics, and human-computer interaction. This book opens up a whole field of study, including the scientific validation of these techniques, their limitations, and their generalizations to different types of datasets.

  • An Introduction to Verification of Visualization Techniques

    As we increase our reliance on computer-generated information, often using it as part of our decision-making process, we must devise tools to assess the correctness of that information. Consider, for example, software embedded on vehicles, used for simulating aircraft performance, or used in medical imaging. In those cases, software correctness is of paramount importance as there's little room for error. Software verification is one of the tools available to attain such goals. Verification is a well known and widely studied subfield of computer science and computational science and the goal is to help us increase confidence in the software implementation by verifying that the software does what it is supposed to do. The goal of this book is to introduce the reader to software verification in the context of visualization. In the same way we became more dependent on commercial software, we have also increased our reliance on visualization software. The reason is simple: visualization is the lens through which users can understand complex data, and as such it must be verified. The explosion in our ability to amass data requires tools not only to store and analyze data, but also to visualize it. This book is comprised of six chapters. After an introduction to the goals of the book, we present a brief description of both worlds of visualization (Chapter 2) and verification (Chapter 3). We then proceed to illustrate the main steps of the verification pipeline for visualization algorithms. We focus on two classic volume visualization techniques, namely, Isosurface Extraction (Chapter 4) and Direct Volume Rendering (Chapter 5). We explain how to verify implementations of those techniques and report the latest results in the field of verification of visualization techniques. The last chapter concludes the book and highlights new research topics for the future.

  • Interactive GPU-based Visualization of Large Dynamic Particle Data

    <p>Prevalent types of data in scientific visualization are volumetric data, vector field data, and particle-based data. Particle data typically originates from measurements and simulations in various fields, such as life sciences or physics. The particles are often visualized directly, that is, by simple representants like spheres. Interactive rendering facilitates the exploration and visual analysis of the data. With increasing data set sizes in terms of particle numbers, interactive high-quality visualization is a challenging task. This is especially true for dynamic data or abstract representations that are based on the raw particle data. </p><p>This book covers direct particle visualization using simple glyphs as well as abstractions that are application-driven such as clustering and aggregation. It targets visualization researchers and developers who are interested in visualization techniques for large, dynamic particle-based data. Its explanations focus on GPU-accelerated algorithms for high-performance rendering and data processing that run in real-time on modern desktop hardware. Consequently, the implementation of said algorithms and the required data structures to make use of the capabilities of modern graphics APIs are discussed in detail. Furthermore, it covers GPU-accelerated methods for the generation of application-dependent abstract representations. This includes various representations commonly used in application areas such as structural biology, systems biology, thermodynamics, and astrophysics.</p>

  • A, B, See... in 3D: A Workbook to Improve 3-D Visualization Skills

    The workbook provides over 100 3D visualization exercises challenging the student to create three dimensions from two. It is a powerful and effective way to help engineering and architecture educators teach spatial visualization. Most of the 3-D visualization exercises currently being used by students in Design and Graphics classes present the objects in isometric views already in 3-D, asking the viewer to create multiple views, fold patterns, manipulate, reflect, or rotate them. The exercises presenting the objects in incomplete multiview projections asking the students to add missing lines use mostly real 3D objects that are more easily recognizable to help the student correlate 2D with 3D. This workbook uses a different approach. Each view of the solid represents a letter of the alphabet. The letters are by definition 2D representations and when they are combined to create a 3D object, visualizing it becomes quite a challenge. This workbook is intended for Engineering, Architecture, and Art students and faculty that want to increase their 3-D visualization skills.

  • Analysis and Visualization of Citation Networks

    Citation analysis—the exploration of reference patterns in the scholarly and scientific literature—has long been applied in a number of social sciences to study research impact, knowledge flows, and knowledge networks. It has important information science applications as well, particularly in knowledge representation and in information retrieval. Recent years have seen a burgeoning interest in citation analysis to help address research, management, or information service issues such as university rankings, research evaluation, or knowledge domain visualization. This renewed and growing interest stems from significant improvements in the availability and accessibility of digital bibliographic data (both citation and full text) and of relevant computer technologies. The former provides large amounts of data and the latter the necessary tools for researchers to conduct new types of large-scale citation analysis, even without special access to special data collections. Exciting new developments are emerging this way in many aspects of citation analysis. This book critically examines both theory and practical techniques of citation network analysis and visualization, one of the two main types of citation analysis (the other being evaluative citation analysis). To set the context for its main theme, the book begins with a discussion of the foundations of citation analysis in general, including an overview of what can and what cannot be done with citation analysis (Chapter 1). An in-depth examination of the generally accepted steps and procedures for citation network analysis follows, including the concepts and techniques that are associated with each step (Chapter 2). Individual issues that are particularly important in citation network analysis are then scrutinized, namely: field delineation and data sources for citation analysis (Chapter 3); disambiguation of names and references (Chapter 4); and visualization of citation networks (Chapter 5). Sufficient technical detail is provided in each chapter so the book can serve as a practical how-to guide to conducting citation network analysis and visualization studies. While the discussion of most of the topics in this book applies to all types of citation analysis, the structure of the text and the details of procedures, examples, and tools covered here are geared to citation network analysis rather than evaluative citation analysis. This conscious choice was based on the authors’ observation that, compared to evaluative citation analysis, citation network analysis has not been covered nearly as well by dedicated books, despite the fact that it has not been subject to nearly as much severe criticism and has been substantially enriched in recent years with new theory and techniques from research areas such as network science, social network analysis, or information visualization.

  • Software Evolution Analysis and Visualization

    This chapter contains sections titled: * Introduction * Multiple Evolution Metrics View * Feature Evolution View * Developer Contribution View * Change Coupling View * Related Work * Resume * Acknowledgments * References

  • Interaction for Visualization

    Visualization has become a valuable means for data exploration and analysis. Interactive visualization combines expressive graphical representations and effective user interaction. Although interaction is an important component of visualization approaches, much of the visualization literature tends to pay more attention to the graphical representation than to interaction. The goal of this work is to strengthen the interaction side of visualization. Based on a brief review of general aspects of interaction, we develop an interaction- oriented view on visualization. This view comprises five key aspects: the data, the tasks, the technology, the human, as well as the implementation. Picking up these aspects individually, we elaborate several interaction methods for visualization. We introduce a multi-threading architecture for efficient interactive exploration. We present interaction techniques for different types of data e.g., multivariate data, spatio-temporal data, graphs) and different visualization tasks (e.g., exploratory navigation, visual comparison, visual editing). With respect to technology, we illustrate approaches that utilize modern interaction modalities (e.g., touch, tangibles, proxemics) as well as classic ones. While the human is important throughout this work, we also consider automatic methods to assist the interactive part. In addition to solutions for individual problems, a major contribution of this work is the overarching view of interaction in visualization as a whole. This includes a critical discussion of interaction, the identification of links between the key aspects of interaction, and the formulation of research topics for future work with a focus on interaction.

  • Interactive Information Visualization to Explore and Query Electronic Health Records

    Physicians are confronted with increasingly complex patient histories based on which they must make life-critical treatment decisions. At the same time, clinical researchers are eager to study the growing databases of patient histories to detect unknown patterns, ensure quality control, and discover surprising outcomes. Designers of Electronic Health Record systems (EHRs) have great potential to apply innovative visual methods to support clinical decision-making and research. This work surveys the state-of-the-art of information visualization systems for exploring and querying EHRs, as described in the scientific literature. It examines how systems differ in their features and highlights how these differences are related to their design and the medical scenarios that they tackle. Some features of the book include: a survey of state-of-the-art information visualization systems from academic literature, a review of the visualization and interaction techniques found in 14 of these systems, including strengths and weaknesses, and compact descriptions of 32 additional EHR visualization systems, a summary of evaluation studies conducted in medical context, an overview of data visualization in commercial EHR systems, and recommendations and future research directions for information visualization in EHR systems. The monograph is written for both scientific researchers and designers of future user interfaces for EHRs. The aim is to help them understand this vital domain and appreciate the features and virtues of existing systems so they can create still more advanced systems. It concludes by identifying potential future research topics in interactive support for data abstraction, in systems for intermittent users, such as patients, and in more detailed evaluations.

  • Design of Visualizations for Human-Information Interaction: A Pattern-Based Framework

    <p>Interest in visualization design has increased in recent years. While there is a large body of existing work from which visualization designers can draw, much of the past research has focused on developing new tools and techniques that are aimed at specific contexts. Less focus has been placed on developing holistic frameworks, models, and theories that can guide visualization design at a general level—a level that transcends domains, data types, users, and other contextual factors. In addition, little emphasis has been placed on the thinking processes of designers, including the concepts that designers use, while they are engaged in a visualization design activity. </p><p> In this book we present a general, holistic framework that is intended to support visualization design for human-information interaction. The framework is composed of a number of conceptual elements that can aid in design thinking. The core of the framework is a pattern language—consisting of a set of 14 basic, abstract patterns—and a simple syntax for describing how the patterns are blended. We also present a design process, made up of four main stages, for creating static or interactive visualizations. The 4-stage design process places the patterns at the core of designers’ thinking, and employs a number of conceptual tools that help designers think systematically about creating visualizations based on the information they intend to represent. </p><p> Although the framework can be used to design static visualizations for simple tasks, its real utility can be found when designing visualizations with interactive possibilities in mind—in other words, designing to support a human-information interactive discourse. This is especially true in contexts where interactive visualizations need to support complex tasks and activities involving large and complex information spaces. The framework is intended to be general and can thus be used to design visualizations for diverse domains, users, information spaces, and tasks in different fields such as business intelligence, health and medical informatics, digital libraries, journalism, education, scientific discovery, and others. Drawing from research in multiple disciplines, we introduce novel concepts and terms that can positively contribute to visualization design practice and education, and will hopefully stimulate further research in this area.</p>

  • Visualization of Time-Varying Waveform Distortions with Wavelets

    This chapter contains sections titled: * Introduction * Steady-state and time-varying waveform distortions and Fourier analysis * Dealing with time-varying waveform distortions * Wavelet multiresolution decomposition * The selection of the mother wavelet * Impact of sampling rate and filter characteristic * Time-varying waveform distortions with wavelets * Application to an isolated power system time-varying distortions * Conclusions * References ]]>



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