Usability

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Usability is the ease of use and learnability of a human-made object. (Wikipedia.org)






Conferences related to Usability

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2014 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE)

The Frontiers in Education (FIE)Conference is the major international conference about educational innovations and research in engineering and computing. FIE 2014 continues a long tradition of disseminating results in these areas. It is an ideal forum for sharing ideas; learning about developments in computer science, engineering, and technology education; and interacting with colleagues in these fields.

  • 2013 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE)

    The Frontiers in Education (FIE)Conference is the major international conference about educational innovations and research in engineering and computing. FIE 2013 continues a long tradition of disseminating results in these areas. It is an ideal forum for sharing ideas; learning about developments in computer science, engineering, and technology education; and interacting with colleagues in these fields.

  • 2012 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE)

    The Frontiers in Education (FIE)Conference is the major international conference about educational innovations and research in engineering and computing. FIE 2012 continues a long tradition of disseminating results in these areas. It is an ideal forum for sharing ideas; learning about developments in computer science, engineering, and technology education; and interacting with colleagues in these fields.

  • 2011 Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE)

    The Frontiers in Education (FIE) Conference is the major international conference about educational innovations and research in engineering and computing. FIE 2011 continues a long tradition of disseminating results in these areas. It is an ideal forum for sharing ideas; learning about developments in computer science, engineering, and technology education; and interacting with colleagues in these fields.

  • 2010 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE)

    (FIE) Conference is a major international conference devoted to improvements in computer science, engineering, and technology (CSET) education. FIE 2008 continues a long tradition of disseminating educational research results and innovative practices in CSET education. It is an ideal forum for sharing ideas, learning about developments in CSET education, and interacting with colleagues.

  • 2009 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE)

    FIE is a major international conference devoted to improvements in computer science, engineering and technology (CSET) education. FIE continues a loong tradition of disseminating educational research results and innovative practices in CSET education. It is an ideal forum for sharing ideas, learning about developments in CSET education, and interacting with colleagues.

  • 2008 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE)

  • 2007 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE)

    Globalization has dramatically changed engineering. Global engineering teams design products for global markets. Knowledge has no borders in a world where information flow is digitalized and sent worldwide in seconds. A core requirement of engineering globalization is an understanding of how the different cultures of the global marketplace shape product development, mult-national engineering teams, and consumer expectations. Engineering education must address this issue.

  • 2006 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE)

  • 2005 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE)


2013 5th International Workshop on Near Field Communication (NFC)

NFC 2013 is the 5th International Research Workshop with focus on Near Field Communication (NFC). This workshop covers the entire technological area, beginning from RF and hardware, smartcards approach, security, applications and services, business processes, up to usability and user experience. NFC 2013 is ideal for addressing the challenges facing multidisciplinary research, development, design, and proof of concepts, pilot projects, deployment and fundamental limits of the NFC technology.

  • 2012 4th International Workshop on Near Field Communication (NFC)

    NFC2012 is 4th International Research Workshop with focus on Near Field Communication (NFC). This conference covers the entire technological area, beginning from RF and hardware, smartcards approach, security, applications and services, business processes, up to usability and user experience. NFC2012 is ideal for addressing the challenges facing multidisciplinary research, development, design, and proof of concepts, pilot projects, deployment and fundamental limits of the NFC technology.

  • 2011 3rd International Workshop on Near Field Communication - NFC'11

    This workshop covers the entire technological area, beginning from RF & hardware related topics, smartcards approaches, security, applications and services, business processes, up to usability and user experience. It aims to provide a forum for a full and detailed discussion of the research issues of NFC as an integrative concept that covers hardware, software, security, usability and different fields of applications.

  • 2010 2nd International Workshop on Near Field Communication - NFC'10

    The international workshop on Near Field Communication (NFC) will bring together researchers and practitioners in the area of RF & hardware related topics, smartcards & security, applications & services and usability & user experience. The workshop is ideal for addressing the challenges facing the research, development, design, manufacture, deployment and fundamental limits.


2013 IEEE Conference on Cybernetics and Intelligent Systems (CIS)

The goal of the CIS 2013 is to bring together experts from the field of cybernetics and intelligent systems to discuss on the state-of-the-art and to present new research findings and perspectives of future developments with respect to the conference themes. The goal of the RAM 2013 is to bring together experts from the field of robotics, automation and mechatronics to discuss on the state-of-the-art and to present new research findings and perspectives of future developments.


2013 IEEE International Professional Communication Conference (IPCC 2013)

The theme of the conference is "Beyond Borders: Communicating Globally." Sessons will include empirical studies, workshops, tutorials, and industry applications.


2012 16th Annual International Symposium on Wearable Computers (ISWC)

ISWC 2012, the sixteenth annual International Symposium on Wearable Computers, is the premier forum for wearable computing and issues related to on-body and worn mobile technologies. ISWC'12 will bring together researchers, product vendors, fashion designers, textile manufacturers, users, and related professionals to share information and advances in wearable computing.


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Periodicals related to Usability

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Professional Communication, IEEE Transactions on

The study, development, improvement, and promotion of techniques for preparing, organizing for use, processing, editing, collecting, conserving, and disseminating any form of information in the electrical and electronics fields.




Xplore Articles related to Usability

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Grid Portal Design and Usability Evaluation

Yossathorn Phumisuth; Tiranee Achalakul 2006 International Symposium on Communications and Information Technologies, 2006

Grid technology utilizes and manages the distributed computing infrastructure. The distributed resources appear to end-users as a single virtual environment. Currently, there are a wide variety of researches based on grid, from both academia and industries over the world. However, most grid platforms are usually based on UNIX. Thus, the users can interact with a grid system mainly through a ...


User feedback on physical marker interfaces for protecting visual privacy from mobile robots

Matthew Rueben; Frank J. Bernieri; Cindy M. Grimm; William D. Smart 2016 11th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI), 2016

We present a study that examines the efficiency and usability of three different interfaces for specifying which objects should be kept private (i.e., not visible) in an office environment. Our study context is a robot "janitor" system that has the ability to blur out specified objects from its video feed. One interface is a traditional point-and-click GUI on a computer ...


Evaluating the Usability of Mashups Applications

Emilio Insfran; Priscila Cedillo; Adrián Fernández; Silvia Abrahão; Maristella Matera 2012 Eighth International Conference on the Quality of Information and Communications Technology, 2012

Mashups are new-generation of Web applications aimed at reutilizing contents and services provided by third-party components. In Web applications, usability is considered one of the most important quality factors. However, usability evaluation of mashups is usually relied upon their individual components. Therefore, there is a need for specific approaches in order to evaluate the usability of mashups by considering their ...


Hidden Price of User Authentication: Cost Analysis and Stakeholder Motivation

Ludwig Meyer; Martin Auer; Markus Klemen; Stefan Biffl 2011 Sixth International Conference on Availability, Reliability and Security, 2011

IT security is a vital task; user authentication a fundamental part. Yet the policies to implement user authentication often have a poor cost/benefit ratio. This paper (i) analyzes the costs of typical user authentication policies based on interviews with large Austrian IT providers. It (ii) then elaborates on how the policies are chosen, focusing on a lack of real cost ...


User-Feedback on a Feature-Rich Photo Organiser

David A. Sadlier; Hyowon Lee; Cathal Gurrin; Alan F. Smeaton; Noel E. O'Connor 2008 Ninth International Workshop on Image Analysis for Multimedia Interactive Services, 2008

As the proliferation of digital photography increases, the software used to manage our increasingly large collections of digital photos becomes ever more important. In this paper we present the findings of a study which investigates how people view and interact with a set of photo management features. Specifically, a group of users are set the task of managing their own ...


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Educational Resources on Usability

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eLearning

Grid Portal Design and Usability Evaluation

Yossathorn Phumisuth; Tiranee Achalakul 2006 International Symposium on Communications and Information Technologies, 2006

Grid technology utilizes and manages the distributed computing infrastructure. The distributed resources appear to end-users as a single virtual environment. Currently, there are a wide variety of researches based on grid, from both academia and industries over the world. However, most grid platforms are usually based on UNIX. Thus, the users can interact with a grid system mainly through a ...


User feedback on physical marker interfaces for protecting visual privacy from mobile robots

Matthew Rueben; Frank J. Bernieri; Cindy M. Grimm; William D. Smart 2016 11th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI), 2016

We present a study that examines the efficiency and usability of three different interfaces for specifying which objects should be kept private (i.e., not visible) in an office environment. Our study context is a robot "janitor" system that has the ability to blur out specified objects from its video feed. One interface is a traditional point-and-click GUI on a computer ...


Evaluating the Usability of Mashups Applications

Emilio Insfran; Priscila Cedillo; Adrián Fernández; Silvia Abrahão; Maristella Matera 2012 Eighth International Conference on the Quality of Information and Communications Technology, 2012

Mashups are new-generation of Web applications aimed at reutilizing contents and services provided by third-party components. In Web applications, usability is considered one of the most important quality factors. However, usability evaluation of mashups is usually relied upon their individual components. Therefore, there is a need for specific approaches in order to evaluate the usability of mashups by considering their ...


Hidden Price of User Authentication: Cost Analysis and Stakeholder Motivation

Ludwig Meyer; Martin Auer; Markus Klemen; Stefan Biffl 2011 Sixth International Conference on Availability, Reliability and Security, 2011

IT security is a vital task; user authentication a fundamental part. Yet the policies to implement user authentication often have a poor cost/benefit ratio. This paper (i) analyzes the costs of typical user authentication policies based on interviews with large Austrian IT providers. It (ii) then elaborates on how the policies are chosen, focusing on a lack of real cost ...


User-Feedback on a Feature-Rich Photo Organiser

David A. Sadlier; Hyowon Lee; Cathal Gurrin; Alan F. Smeaton; Noel E. O'Connor 2008 Ninth International Workshop on Image Analysis for Multimedia Interactive Services, 2008

As the proliferation of digital photography increases, the software used to manage our increasingly large collections of digital photos becomes ever more important. In this paper we present the findings of a study which investigates how people view and interact with a set of photo management features. Specifically, a group of users are set the task of managing their own ...


More eLearning Resources

IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Index

    Text, ConText, and HyperText presents recent developments in three related and important areas of technical communication: the design of effective documentation; the impact of new technology and research on technical writing; and the training and management of technical writers.The contributors are all authorities drawn from universities and industry who are active in defining and analyzing the role of computing in technical documentation and the role of documentation in the development of computing technology. This first synthesis of their diverse but related research provides a unique conceptualization of the field of computers and writing and documentation.The book first examines techniques for writing online documentation and the value of usability testing. It presents new research into the impact of human factors in screen design and designing online help, and looks at the impact of desktop publishing on documentation, and at visual literacy and graphic design.Artificial intelligence and documentation processing are then addressed with discussion of data acquisition, automated formatting in expert systems, and document databases; the uses of HyperText in documentation; and the future of technical writing in this new environment.Text, ConText, and HyperText concludes by examining the training and management of documentation groups: how they "learn to write" in industry, management of large-scale documentation projects and their effect on product development; and the "two cultures" of engineering and documentation.Edward Barrett is a Lecturer in the Writing Program at MIT. Text, ConText, and HyperText is included in the Information Systems series, edited by Michael Lesk.

  • Management, Training, and Corporate Culture

    Text, ConText, and HyperText presents recent developments in three related and important areas of technical communication: the design of effective documentation; the impact of new technology and research on technical writing; and the training and management of technical writers.The contributors are all authorities drawn from universities and industry who are active in defining and analyzing the role of computing in technical documentation and the role of documentation in the development of computing technology. This first synthesis of their diverse but related research provides a unique conceptualization of the field of computers and writing and documentation.The book first examines techniques for writing online documentation and the value of usability testing. It presents new research into the impact of human factors in screen design and designing online help, and looks at the impact of desktop publishing on documentation, and at visual literacy and graphic design.Artificial intelligence and documentation processing are then addressed with discussion of data acquisition, automated formatting in expert systems, and document databases; the uses of HyperText in documentation; and the future of technical writing in this new environment.Text, ConText, and HyperText concludes by examining the training and management of documentation groups: how they "learn to write" in industry, management of large-scale documentation projects and their effect on product development; and the "two cultures" of engineering and documentation.Edward Barrett is a Lecturer in the Writing Program at MIT. Text, ConText, and HyperText is included in the Information Systems series, edited by Michael Lesk.

  • Index

    In Aesthetic Computing, key scholars and practitioners from art, design, computer science, and mathematics lay the foundations for a discipline that applies the theory and practice of art to computing. Aesthetic computing explores the way art and aesthetics can play a role in different areas of computer science. One of its goals is to modify computer science by the application of the wide range of definitions and categories normally associated with making art. For example, structures in computing might be represented using the style of Gaudi or the Bauhaus school. This goes beyond the usual definition of aesthetics in computing, which most often refers to the formal, abstract qualities of such structures--a beautiful proof, or an elegant diagram. The contributors to this book discuss the broader spectrum of aesthetics--from abstract qualities of symmetry and form to ideas of creative expression and pleasure--in the context of computer science. The assumption behind aesthetic computing is that the field of computing will be enriched if it embraces all of aesthetics. Human-computer interaction will benefit--"usability," for example, could refer to improving a user's emotional state--and new models of learning will emerge.Aesthetic Computing approaches its subject from a variety of perspectives. After defining the field and placing it in its historical context, the book looks at art and design, mathematics and computing, and interface and interaction. Contributions range from essays on the art of visualization and "the poesy of programming" to discussions of the aesthetics of mathematics throughout history and transparency and reflectivity in interface design.Contributors:James Alty, Olav W. Bertelsen, Jay David Bolter, Donna Cox, Stephan Diehl, Mark d'Inverno, Mic hele Emmer, Paul Fishwick, Monica Fleischmann, Ben Fry, Carsten Gï¿¿ï¿¿rg, Susanne Grabowski, Diane Gromala, Kenneth A. Huff, John Lee, Frederic Fol Leymarie, Michael Leyton, Jonas Lï¿¿ï¿¿wgren, Roger F. Malina, Laurent Mignonneau, Frieder Nake, Ray Paton, Jane Prophet, Aaron Quigley, Casey Reas, Christa Sommerer, Wolfgang Strauss, Noam Tractinksy, Paul Vickers, Dror Zmiri

  • Usability Rationale

    This chapter contains sections titled: Claims and Requirements for the Touchstone Scenario, Designing and Analyzing a New Touchstone Scenario, Identifying Appropriate Goals, Sustained Learning, Consequences for Work Groups, The Place of Claims Analysis in Scenario-Based Design

  • No title

    This book covers technologies, applications, tools, languages, procedures, advantages, and disadvantages of reconfigurable supercomputing using Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs). The target audience is the community of users of High Performance Computers (HPC) who may benefit from porting their applications into a reconfigurable environment. As such, this book is intended to guide the HPC user through the many algorithmic considerations, hardware alternatives, usability issues, programming languages, and design tools that need to be understood before embarking on the creation of reconfigurable parallel codes. We hope to show that FPGA acceleration, based on the exploitation of the data parallelism, pipelining and concurrency remains promising in view of the diminishing improvements in traditional processor and system design. Table of Contents: FPGA Technology / Reconfigurable Supercomputing / Algorithmic Considerations / FPGA Programming Languages / Case Study: Sorting / Alternat ve Technologies and Concluding Remarks

  • References

    The authors of Thoughtful Interaction Design go beyond the usual technical concerns of usability and usefulness to consider interaction design from a design perspective. The shaping of digital artifacts is a design process that influences the form and functions of workplaces, schools, communication, and culture; the successful interaction designer must use both ethical and aesthetic judgment to create designs that are appropriate to a given environment. This book is not a how-to manual, but a collection of tools for thought about interaction design.Working with information technology -- called by the authors "the material without qualities" -- interaction designers create not a static object but a dynamic pattern of interactivity. The design vision is closely linked to context and not simply focused on the technology. The authors' action-oriented and context-dependent design theory, drawing on design theorist Donald Schön's concept of the reflective practitioner, helps designers deal with complex design challenges created by new technology and new knowledge. Their approach, based on a foundation of thoughtfulness that acknowledges the designer's responsibility not only for the functional qualities of the design product but for the ethical and aesthetic qualities as well, fills the need for a theory of interaction design that can increase and nurture design knowledge. From this perspective they address the fundamental question of what kind of knowledge an aspiring designer needs, discussing the process of design, the designer, design methods and techniques, the design product and its qualities, and conditions for interaction design.

  • References

    Industry veteran Raymond Nickerson provides an extensive introduction to the information technology revolution that is transforming industrial society. He focuses particularly on the study of person-computer interaction, noting how computers are affecting their users and society as a whole, and describes a variety of ways in which information technology is expected to develop in the forseeable future.Nickerson summarizes the development of information technology and discusses many of its applications - in farming, research, education and training, manufacturing, general management, retailing, defense, and elsewhere - that have already had a substantial impact on society. He reviews the human-factors research that has been done and is underway, with special attention to the physical and cognitive interface, including languages, conversational interactions, and the concepts of friendliness and usability.Raymond S. Nickerson is Senior Vice President of BBN Laboratories, a subsidiary of Bolt Beranek and Newman Inc. A Bradford Book.

  • Some Experience! Some Evolution!

    This chapter contains section titled: J. Whiteside, J. Bennett, and K. Holtzblatt, 1988: "Usability Engineering: Our Experience and Evolution"

  • No title

    Reading is a complex human activity that has evolved, and co-evolved, with technology over thousands of years. Mass printing in the fifteenth century firmly established what we know as the modern book, with its physical format of covers and paper pages, and now-standard features such as page numbers, footnotes, and diagrams. Today, electronic documents are enabling paperless reading supported by eReading technologies such as Kindles and Nooks, yet a high proportion of users still opt to print on paper before reading. This persistent habit of "printing to read" is one sign of the shortcomings of digital documents -- although the popularity of eReaders is one sign of the shortcomings of paper. How do we get the best of both worlds? The physical properties of paper (for example, it is light, thin, and flexible) contribute to the ease with which physical documents are manipulated; but these properties have a completely different set of affordances to their digital equivalents. Paper can b folded, ripped, or scribbled on almost subconsciously -- activities that require significant cognitive attention in their digital form, if they are even possible. The nearly subliminal interaction that comes from years of learned behavior with paper has been described as lightweight interaction, which is achieved when a person actively reads an article in a way that is so easy and unselfconscious that they are not apt to remember their actions later. Reading is now in a period of rapid change, and digital text is fast becoming the predominant mode of reading. As a society, we are merely at the start of the journey of designing truly effective tools for handling digital text. This book investigates the advantages of paper, how the affordances of paper can be realized in digital form, and what forms best support lightweight interaction for active reading. To understand how to design for the future, we review the ways reading technology and reader behavior have both changed and remained constant over hundreds of years. We explore the reasoning behind reader behavior and introduce and evaluate several user interface designs that implement these lightweight properties familiar from our everyday use of paper. We start by looking back, reviewing the development of reading technology and the progress of research on reading over many years. Drawing key concepts from this review, we move forward to develop and test methods for creating new and more effective interactions for supporting digital reading. Finally, we lay down a set of lightweight attributes which can be used as evidence-based guidelines to improve the usability of future digital reading technologies. By the end of this book, then, we hope you will be equipped to critique the present state of digital reading, and to better design and evaluate new interaction styles and technologies.

  • Babel in Document Design: The Evaluation of Multilingual Texts

    Translations are considered by their specific target audiences to be first and foremost autonomous documents. Hence, they should be evaluated in terms of whether or not they achieve their communicative goals. This chapter analyzes the process of document design in a multilingual setting. In order to evaluate translation quality, a theoretical perspective is formulated as a basis for criteria for a good translation. In this perspective, the target text is considered an autonomous document. Two sets of criteria are distinguished: correctness errors and junctional errors. Two tools were used to assess translation quality: expert analysis and reader-focused evaluation. For both tools, a multilingual evaluation team was formed with the highest possible expertise in the target languages, in linguistics, and in usability. The chapter also describes the process of evaluation and the results.



Standards related to Usability

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Jobs related to Usability

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