Conferences related to Positron Emission Tomography

Back to Top

2020 IEEE International Instrumentation and Measurement Technology Conference (I2MTC)

The Conference focuses on all aspects of instrumentation and measurement science andtechnology research development and applications. The list of program topics includes but isnot limited to: Measurement Science & Education, Measurement Systems, Measurement DataAcquisition, Measurements of Physical Quantities, and Measurement Applications.


2019 14th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

HRI is a highly selective annual conference that showcases the very best research and thinking in human-robot interaction. HRI is inherently interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary, reflecting work from researchers in robotics, psychology, cognitive science, HCI, human factors, artificial intelligence, organizational behavior, anthropology, and many other fields.

  • 2018 13th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    HRI is a highly selective annual conference that showcases the very best research and thinking in human-robot interaction. HRI is inherently interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary, reflecting work from researchersin robotics, psychology, cognitive science, HCI, human factors, artificial intelligence, organizational behavior,anthropology, and many other fields.

  • 2017 12th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    The conference serves as the primary annual meeting for researchers in the field of human-robot interaction. The event will include a main papers track and additional sessions for posters, demos, and exhibits. Additionally, the conference program will include a full day of workshops and tutorials running in parallel.

  • 2016 11th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    This conference focuses on the interaction between humans and robots.

  • 2015 10th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    HRI is a single -track, highly selective annual conference that showcases the very bestresearch and thinking in human -robot interaction. HRI is inherently interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary,reflecting work from researchers in robotics, psychology, cognitive science, HCI, human factors, artificialintelligence, organizational behavior, anthropology, and many other fields.

  • 2014 9th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    HRI is a highly selective annual conference that showcases the very best research and thinking in human -robot interaction. HRI is inherently interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary, reflecting work from researchers in robotics, psychology, cognitive science, HCI, human factors, artificial intelligence, organizational behavior, anthropology, and many other fields.

  • 2013 8th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    HRI is a single -track, highly selective annual conference that showcases the very best research and thinking in human-robot interaction. HRI is inherently interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary, reflecting work from researchers in robotics, psychology, cognitive science, HCI, human factors, artificial intelligence, organizational behavior, anthropology, and many other fields.

  • 2012 7th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    HRI is a single-track, highly selective annual conference that showcases the very best research and thinking in human-robot interaction. HRI is inherently interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary, reflecting work from researchers in robotics, psychology, cognitive science, HCI, human factors, artificial intelligence, organizational behavior, anthropology, and many other fields.

  • 2011 6th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    Robot companions Lifelike robots Assistive (health & personal care) robotics Remote robots Mixed initiative interaction Multi-modal interaction Long-term interaction with robots Awareness and monitoring of humans Task allocation and coordination Autonomy and trust Robot-team learning User studies of HRI Experiments on HRI collaboration Ethnography and field studies HRI software architectures HRI foundations Metrics for teamwork HRI group dynamics.

  • 2010 5th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    TOPICS: Robot companions, Lifelike robots, Assistive (health & personal care) robotics, Remote robots, Mixed initiative interaction, Multi-modal interaction, Long-term interaction with robots, Awareness and monitoring of humans, Task allocation and coordination, Autonomy and trust, Robot-team learning, User studies of HRI, Experiments on HRI collaboration, Ethnography and field studies, HRI software architectures

  • 2009 4th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    * Robot companions * Lifelike robots * Assistive (health & personal care) robotics * Remote robots * Mixed initiative interaction * Multi-modal interaction * Long-term interaction with robots * Awareness and monitoring of humans * Task allocation and coordination * Autonomy and trust * Robot-team learning * User studies of HRI * Experiments on HRI collaboration * Ethnography and field studies * HRI software architectures

  • 2008 3rd ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)

    Robot companions Lifelike robots Assistive (health & personal care) robotics Remote robots Mixed initiative interaction Multi-modal interaction Long-term interaction with robots Awareness and monitoring of humans Task allocation and coordination Autonomy and trust Robot-team learning User studies of HRI Experiments on HRI collaboration Ethnography and field studies HRI software architectures HRI foundations Metrics for teamwork HRI group dynamics Individual vs. group HRI

  • 2007 2nd Annual Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI)


2019 41st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine & Biology Society (EMBC)

The conference program will consist of plenary lectures, symposia, workshops andinvitedsessions of the latest significant findings and developments in all the major fields ofbiomedical engineering.Submitted papers will be peer reviewed. Accepted high quality paperswill be presented in oral and postersessions, will appear in the Conference Proceedings and willbe indexed in PubMed/MEDLINE & IEEE Xplore


2019 IEEE 16th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI)

The IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI) is the premier forum for the presentation of technological advances in theoretical and applied biomedical imaging.ISBI 2019 will be the 16th meeting in this series. The previous meetings have played a leading role in facilitating interaction between researchers in medical and biological imaging. The 2019 meeting will continue this tradition of fostering cross fertilization among different imaging communities and contributing to an integrative approach to biomedical imaging across all scales of observation.


2019 IEEE 46th Photovoltaic Specialists Conference (PVSC)

Photovoltaic materials, devices, systems and related science and technology


More Conferences

Periodicals related to Positron Emission Tomography

Back to Top

Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Broad coverage of concepts and methods of the physical and engineering sciences applied in biology and medicine, ranging from formalized mathematical theory through experimental science and technological development to practical clinical applications.


Computer

Computer, the flagship publication of the IEEE Computer Society, publishes peer-reviewed technical content that covers all aspects of computer science, computer engineering, technology, and applications. Computer is a resource that practitioners, researchers, and managers can rely on to provide timely information about current research developments, trends, best practices, and changes in the profession.


Computers, IEEE Transactions on

Design and analysis of algorithms, computer systems, and digital networks; methods for specifying, measuring, and modeling the performance of computers and computer systems; design of computer components, such as arithmetic units, data storage devices, and interface devices; design of reliable and testable digital devices and systems; computer networks and distributed computer systems; new computer organizations and architectures; applications of VLSI ...


Electrical Insulation Magazine, IEEE

The magazine covers theory, analysis, design (computer-aided design), and practical implementation of circuits, and the application of circuit theoretic techniques to systems and to signal processing. Content is written for the spectrum of activities from basic scientific theory to industrial applications.


Electron Devices, IEEE Transactions on

Publishes original and significant contributions relating to the theory, design, performance and reliability of electron devices, including optoelectronics devices, nanoscale devices, solid-state devices, integrated electronic devices, energy sources, power devices, displays, sensors, electro-mechanical devices, quantum devices and electron tubes.


More Periodicals

Most published Xplore authors for Positron Emission Tomography

Back to Top

Xplore Articles related to Positron Emission Tomography

Back to Top

Inter-Frame Co-Registration of Dynamically Acquired Fluoro-Deoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography Human Brain Data

2007 IEEE/ICME International Conference on Complex Medical Engineering, 2007

When acquiring positron emission tomography (PET) brain scans dynamically from a patient, it would be helpful to be able to minimize confounding effects of his/her head movement. In this study, we attempted to coregister sequential frames in the dynamic fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET image sequence, specifically addressing the challenge associated with the relatively low radiotracer uptake over the cortical areas in ...


A pulse simulator for crystal identification validation of phoswich detectors used in positron emission tomography

2009 Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, 2009

Crystal identification (CI) of phoswich detectors is a technique used in positron emission tomography (PET) for improving spatial resolution through depth-of-interaction determination or higher pixelization. Digital algorithms using advanced digital signal processing techniques currently provide the most powerful approaches for CI of phoswich detectors made of crystals with only slightly different scintillation decay times. Such methods can be implemented in ...


Influence and Compensation of Truncation Artifacts in MR-Based Attenuation Correction in PET/MR

IEEE Transactions on Medical Imaging, 2013

The goal of this article is to quantify the influence of truncation artifacts in the magnetic resonance (MR)-based attenuation map (MRMap) on reconstructed positron emission tomography (PET) image volumes and to propose a new method for minimizing this influence. Methods: PET data sets of 20 patients investigated in a Philips Ingenuity PET/MR were reconstructed with and without applying two different ...


Defining gross tumor volume using positron emission tomography/computed tomography phantom studies

2013 35th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC), 2013

Tumor volume and standard uptake value (SUV) calculated from positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) images differ from their real values. Besides errors introduced by scintillation materials, photomultiplier tubes, and image reconstruction algorithms, measurements are affected by patients' prostheses, body movements, and body shape. To address these problems, we calculated tumor volume and SUV using the standard phantom (PET Phantom-NEMA IEC/2001) ...


NMF on Positron Emission Tomography

2007 IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing - ICASSP '07, 2007

In positron emission tomography, kinetic modelling of brain tracer uptake, metabolism or binding requires knowledge of the cerebral input function. Traditionally, this is achieved with arterial blood sampling in the arm or as shown in (Liptrot, M, et al., 2004) by non-invasive K-means clustering. We propose another method to estimate time-activity curves (TAC) extracted directly from dynamic positron emission tomography ...


More Xplore Articles

Educational Resources on Positron Emission Tomography

Back to Top

IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Inter-Frame Co-Registration of Dynamically Acquired Fluoro-Deoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography Human Brain Data

    When acquiring positron emission tomography (PET) brain scans dynamically from a patient, it would be helpful to be able to minimize confounding effects of his/her head movement. In this study, we attempted to coregister sequential frames in the dynamic fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET image sequence, specifically addressing the challenge associated with the relatively low radiotracer uptake over the cortical areas in the early short frames. PET data were acquired dynamically over sixty minutes in three healthy volunteers (frame durations ranged from 2 seconds to 5 minutes). We realigned each of the early short frames to its immediate predecessor using normalized mutual information (NMI). Afterward, the same procedure was repeated to realign the summation of the early frames, as well as each of the later frames with durations of 5 minutes and sufficient cortical tracer uptake. To validate our proposed procedure, we artificially moved frames using known linear rotations and translocations and compared the 6 NMI estimated rigid-body transformation parameters to the actual misalignment parameters and compared image-derived carotid artery FDG input function in the realigned and original images. While counting statistics in the first 3 frames (22 seconds after FDG administration) precluded us from accurately addressing misalignments, the NMI reliably recovered translocations as great as 7 mm and rotations as great as 8 degrees for all other frames. Moreover, misalignment errors in the constructed input function from the carotid artery region were able to be corrected. Our NMI-based strategy for the realignment of sequential frames appears to provide a helpful way to determine the severity of the head movement during a PET scan and correct for the effects. Additional studies are needed to address additional confounds associated with the misalignment between transmission and emission scans.

  • A pulse simulator for crystal identification validation of phoswich detectors used in positron emission tomography

    Crystal identification (CI) of phoswich detectors is a technique used in positron emission tomography (PET) for improving spatial resolution through depth-of-interaction determination or higher pixelization. Digital algorithms using advanced digital signal processing techniques currently provide the most powerful approaches for CI of phoswich detectors made of crystals with only slightly different scintillation decay times. Such methods can be implemented in the all-digital architecture of LabPET, a small animal PET scanner developed in Sherbrooke, for fast and accurate real-time CI. In order to validate the new CI algorithms and assess their performance for different front-end electronics, a pulse generator simulator was developed to generate PET signals and investigate the effects of factors such as electronic noise, photon statistics and pulse shaping filter. The pulse generator was validated with LabPET-like pulses and CI results were compared with experimental data. The pulse simulator enables CI algorithms to be validated together with detector performance such as energy and timing resolution at an early stage of scanner design.

  • Influence and Compensation of Truncation Artifacts in MR-Based Attenuation Correction in PET/MR

    The goal of this article is to quantify the influence of truncation artifacts in the magnetic resonance (MR)-based attenuation map (MRMap) on reconstructed positron emission tomography (PET) image volumes and to propose a new method for minimizing this influence. Methods: PET data sets of 20 patients investigated in a Philips Ingenuity PET/MR were reconstructed with and without applying two different methods for truncation compensation (TC1 vendor- provided, TC2 newly developed). In this patient group, the extent of truncation artifacts and quality of the truncation compensation (TC) was assessed visually in the MRMaps. In three additional patients MRMaps generated by algorithm TC2 could be compared to the ground truth of transmission-based attenuation maps obtained with a Siemens ECAT HR+ scanner. The influence of truncation on regional SUVs in lesions, other hot structures (bladder, kidney, myocardium) and the arms was assessed in suitable volume of interests (VOI). Results: Truncation compensated MRMaps exhibited residual artifacts in the arms in 16 patients for algorithm TC1 and to a lesser extent in eight patients for algorithm TC2. Compared to the transmission-based attenuation maps algorithm TC2 slightly overestimated the size of the truncated arms by 0.3 cm in the radial direction. Without truncation compensation, VOIs located in the trunk showed an average SUVmax underestimation of less than 5.4% relative to the results obtained with TC2. Inside the patients' arms underestimations up to 46.5% were found. Conclusion: In the trunk, standardized uptake values (SUV) underestimations due to truncation artifacts in the MRMap are rather small. Inside the arms, severe SUV underestimations can occur. Therefore, reliable TC is mandatory and can be achieved by applying the newly developed algorithm TC2 which has yielded promising results so far. Implementation of the proposed method is straightforward and should be easily adaptable to other PET/MR systems.

  • Defining gross tumor volume using positron emission tomography/computed tomography phantom studies

    Tumor volume and standard uptake value (SUV) calculated from positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) images differ from their real values. Besides errors introduced by scintillation materials, photomultiplier tubes, and image reconstruction algorithms, measurements are affected by patients' prostheses, body movements, and body shape. To address these problems, we calculated tumor volume and SUV using the standard phantom (PET Phantom-NEMA IEC/2001) and obtained calibration constants. We found that while tumor volume increases with increasing SUV and tumor diameter, it also increases with increasing SUV and decreasing tumor diameter. Conversely, tumor volume decreases with decreasing SUV and tumor diameter and with decreasing SUV and increasing diameter. These results suggest that a correction factor should be applied to SUV and tumor volume obtained from PET/CT images.

  • NMF on Positron Emission Tomography

    In positron emission tomography, kinetic modelling of brain tracer uptake, metabolism or binding requires knowledge of the cerebral input function. Traditionally, this is achieved with arterial blood sampling in the arm or as shown in (Liptrot, M, et al., 2004) by non-invasive K-means clustering. We propose another method to estimate time-activity curves (TAC) extracted directly from dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) scans by non-negative matrix factorization (NMF). Since the scaling of the basis curves is lost in the NMF the estimated TAC is scaled by a vector alpha which is calculated from the NMF solution. The method is tested on a [<sup>18</sup>F]-Altanserin tracer ligand data set consisting of 5 healthy subjects. The results from using K-means clustering and NMF are compared to a sampled arterial TAC. The comparison is done by calculating the correlation with the arterial sampled TAC.

  • Correction matrix method for elimination of solid angle fraction influence in the positron emission tomography

    In positron emission tomography exists a distorting factor of the solid angle fraction (SAF). There is investigated the influence of the SAF on the reconstruction accuracy depending on the gabarit of the object and the system detector radius. Moreover there is offered the iterative method for distortion elimination based on the idea of the correction matrix.

  • Statistical image reconstruction for hybrid fluorescence optical tomography and positron emission tomography

    We have developed a hybrid system for imaging small animals using fluorescence optical tomography (FOT) and positron emission tomography (PET) simultaneously. This paper presents a statistical method for reconstructing spatial distribution of dual-labeled tracers from the combined PET and FOT data. We use the Poisson likelihood function for the PET data and Gaussian distribution for the FOT data. The log-posterior density function is maximized by an optimization transfer algorithm. Computer simulations show that the hybrid reconstruction using combined PET-FOT data can achieve a better bias versus standard deviation performance than reconstructions using either PET or FOT data alone.

  • A Positron Emission Tomography registered Ultrafast Sonography prototype for preclinical in-vivo studies

    A novel hybrid device is described herein for performing simultaneous Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging (UUI) in vivo. This study aims in qualifying this device for in-vivo studies. Two major issues are addressed: the co-registration of the images originating from each modality and the effect of placing a US probe inside a PET system on the PET images. Experiments on UUI/CT and PET phantoms were performed for the co-registration calibration of this prototype and for quantifying the effect of the US probe on the PET signal.

  • Image Segmentation Method with Positron Emission Tomography Time Sequence Images

    Positron emission tomography(PET)images are often used to detect physiology function. However, PET images have more blurs than anatomic images, such as magnetic resonance imaging(MRI)and computed tomography(CT). With the gray level of PET images, Doctors need to manually obtain the region of interest(ROI). This paper presents a PET image segmentation technology based on the wavelet theory. Through sampling, recombination, and fetching the thresholds of images, the image segmentation with 1960 dynamic PET images of abdominal organs were conducted. Compared with a single PET image, the image segmentation technology proposed can accurately and rapidly identify the boundaries of organs, such as the small intestines, the liver, and the kidney, as well as efficiently provide the ROI information for doctors.

  • LuYAP/LSO Phoswich Detectors for High Resolution Positron Emission Tomography

    The spatial resolution in positron emission tomography (PET) can be improved by the addition of depth-of-interaction (DOI) information. This can be achieved by using the phoswich approach in which depth identification relies on differences in scintillation decay time and pulse shape discrimination techniques. In this paper we have looked at a special phoswich combination LuAP/LSO or LuYAP/LSO. This combination of scintillators is especially interesting since LuAP and LuYAP have emission in the excitation band of LSO, which may have an impact on the timing resolution of the detector. As will be shown in this paper, the phoswich concept based on these two scintillators can be utilized, however, with some limitations. This paper is an extension of our previous phoswich investigation [3].



Standards related to Positron Emission Tomography

Back to Top

No standards are currently tagged "Positron Emission Tomography"


Jobs related to Positron Emission Tomography

Back to Top