Conferences related to Nuclear

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2016 IEEE Nuclear & Space Radiation Effects Conference (NSREC 2016)

This conference offers a one day "Short Course" and 3 1/2 daysof Technical Sessions consisting of 8 -10 sessions of contributed papers.


2016 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium, Medical Imaging Conference and Room-Temperature Semiconductor Detector Workshop (NSS/MIC/RTSD)

The NSS/MIC offers an outstanding opportunity for scientists and engineers interested in the fields of nuclear science, radiation detection, accelerators, high energy physics and astrophysics, and related software to present their latest developments and ideas. The scientific program provides a comprehensive review of the latest developments in technology and covers a wide range of applications from radiation and accelerator instrumentation, new detector materials, to complex detector systems for physical sciences, and advanced imaging systems for biological and medical research.

  • 2015 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference (NSS/MIC)

    The scope of the conference is to present advancements in the field of nuclear science (detectors, electronics and algorithms) as applied to high energy and nuclear physics, as well as various imaging techniques used in Medicine. The conference fosters interactions between instrumentation research and 'end user' application expertise, thus highlighting interdisciplinary aspects of nuclear science.

  • 2014 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference (2014 NSS/MIC)

    The conference emphasizes the latest developments in technology and instrumentation and their implementation in experiments for space, accelerators, other radiation environments, homeland security, and Medical Imaging Sciences

  • 2013 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference (2013 NSS/MIC)

    Detectors, software, signal processing and systems for ionizing radiation. Medical imaging detector and system development for PET, SPECT and other imaging based on nuclear techniques.

  • 2012 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference (2012 NSS/MIC)

    Forum for exchange of scientist and engineers working Nuclear Physics and Medical Imaging in technology and instrumentation and their implementation in experiments for particle physics, space, accelerators and other applications of radiation detection such as the technological and mathematical aspects of radiotracer-based medical imaging and other areas of non-Nuclear Molecular Imaging technologies.

  • 2011 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference (2011 NSS/MIC)

    Detectors, software, signal processing and systems for ionizing radiation. Medical imaging detector and system development for PET, SPECT and other imaging based on nuclear techniques.

  • 2010 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference (2010 NSS/MIC)

    Detectors, software, signal processing and systems for ionizing radiation. Medical imaging detector and system development for PET, SPECT and other imaging based on nuclear techniques.

  • 2009 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference (2009 NSS/MIC)

    Radiation Detectors and Instrumentation and their applications in Physics, Biology, Space,Material Science,Medical Physics, and Homeland Security


2016 Particle Accelerator Conference (PAC)

Particle accelerator

  • 2015 IEEE International Particle Accelerator Conference (IPAC)

    The science, technology and engineering of all types of particle accelerator will be covered by invited speakers, contributed oral presentations and posters.

  • 2013 Particle Accelerator Conference (PAC)

    Topics on particle accelerators, oral and poster sessions. Conference proceedings published on DVD and JACoW website.

  • 2012 IEEE International Particle Accelerator Conference (IPAC)

    The science, technology and engineering of all types of particle accelerator will be covered by invited speakers, contributed oral presentations and posters. Awards will be made for outstanding work in the field and a special session will be devoted to student work. There will be an exhibition by related industrial manufacturers.

  • 2011 IEEE Particle Accelerator Conference (PAC)

    The primary scope of the 2011 Particle Accelerator Conference (PAC11) is to provide a forum for networking, communication and exchange of ideas among accelerator scientists, engineers, students and industry. The Scientific Program comprises invited speakers, contributed orals, poster sessions, an industrial forum, and a student program. The wide range of technical topics covered includes detectors, radiofrequency structures, vacuum, cryogenics, diagnostics, magnets and light sources.

  • 2009 IEEE Particle Accelerator Conference (PAC)

    The primary scope of Particle Accelerator Conferences (PAC) is to provide a forum for communication and exchange of ideas among accelerator scientists, engineers, students and industry. This week-long well-established conference series takes place biennially in North America. The Scientific Program comprises invited speakers, contributed orals, poster sessions, an Industrial Forum and a Student Program. PAC09 is committed to reaching out to young researchers in the field, and has set a budget to partially


2015 IEEE International Conference on Plasma Sciences (ICOPS)

Basic Processes in Fully and Partially Ionized Plasmas; Microwave Generation and Plasma Interactions; Charged Particle Beams and Sources; High Energy Density Plasmas and Applications; Industrial, Commercial, and Medical Plasma Applications; Plasma Diagnostics; Pulsed Power and other Plasma Applications.


2014 IEEE-NPSS Real Time Conference (RT)

Real time data acquisition electronics, data processing, and algorithms applied to nuclear and plasma sciences.

  • 2012 IEEE-NPSS Real Time Conference (RT 2012)

    The 2012 Real Time Conference will be a multidisciplinary conference devoted to the latest developments on real time techniques in the fields of plasma and nuclear fusion, particle physics, nuclear physics and astrophysics, space science, accelerators, medical physics and any radiation instrumentation.

  • 2010 17th Real-Time Conference - IEEE-NPSS Technical Committee on Computer Applications in Nuclear and Plasma Sciences (RT 2010)

    RT2010 will be a multidisciplinary conference devoted to the latest developments on real time techniques in the fields of plasma and nuclear fusion, particle physics, nuclear physics and astrophysics, space science, accelerators, medical physics and any radiation instrumentation.

  • 2009 16th IEEE-NPSS Real Time Conference (RT 2009)

    Multidisciplinary conference devoted to the latest developments on real time techniques in the fields of plasma physics, nuclear physics, particle physics, astrophysics, space science, accelerators, and in medicine and biology.


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Periodicals related to Nuclear

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Medical Imaging, IEEE Transactions on

Imaging methods applied to living organisms with emphasis on innovative approaches that use emerging technologies supported by rigorous physical and mathematical analysis and quantitative evaluation of performance.


Nuclear Science, IEEE Transactions on

All aspects of the theory and applications of nuclear science and engineering, including instrumentation for the detection and measurement of ionizing radiation; particle accelerators and their controls; nuclear medicine and its application; effects of radiation on materials, components, and systems; reactor instrumentation and controls; and measurement of radiation in space.


Plasma Science, IEEE Transactions on

Plasma science and engineering, including: magnetofluid dynamics and thermionics; plasma dynamics; gaseous electronics and arc technology; controlled thermonuclear fusion; electron, ion, and plasma sources; space plasmas; high-current relativistic electron beams; laser-plasma interactions; diagnostics; plasma chemistry and colloidal and solid-state plasmas.


Power and Energy Magazine, IEEE

This magazine is devoted to all aspects of the electric power field involving planning, design, construction, operation, maintenance, and control of power systems.


Spectrum, IEEE

IEEE Spectrum Magazine, the flagship publication of the IEEE, explores the development, applications and implications of new technologies. It anticipates trends in engineering, science, and technology, and provides a forum for understanding, discussion and leadership in these areas. IEEE Spectrum is the world's leading engineering and scientific magazine. Read by over 300,000 engineers worldwide, Spectrum provides international coverage of all ...


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Xplore Articles related to Nuclear

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A Noninteractive Beam Position and Size Monitor for Heavy Ions

John M. Bogaty IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science, 1979

The Ion Beam Fusion development program at Argonne National Laboratory requires noninteractive size measurements of a pulsed, 30 mA, Xe+l particle beam. Pulses of 100 μs duration will be produced by the 1.5 MV preaccelerator; therefore, fast response diagnostics are required. Techniques of utilizing residual gas ionization to profile particle beams have been reported before. This paper discusses the development ...


30 μ A beam toroid

Rodger A. Sanders; Richard S. Konecny IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science, 1979

A standard commercial toroid modified to operate in the zero flux mode has been applied to the monitoring of the 750 keV polarized proton beam at the Zero Gradient Synchrotron (ZGS). The beam parameters are: rise time - 3 ms, pulse width - 15 ms, current - 30 μA. This beam produces a free space flux of H = 8.2 ...


RF discharge in the transverse magnetic field numerical model

A. V. Lukyanova; A. T. Rakhimov; N. V. Suetin IEEE Transactions on Plasma Science, 1991

A numerical model of RF discharges in a steady transverse magnetic field is developed. This model is valid in a range of parameters (gas pressure, magnetic field, RF voltage) used in a number of experimental and technical installations. The comparison between numerical calculations and some experimental results is presented


Exact frequency-domain reconstruction for thermoacoustic tomography. II. Cylindrical geometry

Yuan Xu; Minghua Xu; L. V. Wang IEEE Transactions on Medical Imaging, 2002

For pt. I see ibid., vol. 21, no. 7, p. 823-8 (2002). Microwave-induced thermoacoustic tomography (TAT) in a cylindrical configuration is developed to image biological tissue. Thermoacoustic signals are acquired by scanning a flat ultrasonic transducer. Using a new expansion of a spherical wave in cylindrical coordinates, we apply the Fourier and Hankel transforms to TAT and obtain an exact ...


Oscillatory torque caused by dead time in the current control of high power gearless mills

V. Guerrero; J. Pontt IECON 2011 - 37th Annual Conference of the IEEE Industrial Electronics Society, 2011

In modern high energy industrial processes, high power converters are one of the most important topics in terms of efficiency, energy savings and dynamic behaviour of all electrical drives. In our time, synchronous machines are used in many high power applications, like electric generation (hydroelectric and nuclear plants, etc) transportation (trains, cars, etc), and many more. In the mining industry ...


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Educational Resources on Nuclear

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eLearning

A Noninteractive Beam Position and Size Monitor for Heavy Ions

John M. Bogaty IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science, 1979

The Ion Beam Fusion development program at Argonne National Laboratory requires noninteractive size measurements of a pulsed, 30 mA, Xe+l particle beam. Pulses of 100 μs duration will be produced by the 1.5 MV preaccelerator; therefore, fast response diagnostics are required. Techniques of utilizing residual gas ionization to profile particle beams have been reported before. This paper discusses the development ...


30 μ A beam toroid

Rodger A. Sanders; Richard S. Konecny IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science, 1979

A standard commercial toroid modified to operate in the zero flux mode has been applied to the monitoring of the 750 keV polarized proton beam at the Zero Gradient Synchrotron (ZGS). The beam parameters are: rise time - 3 ms, pulse width - 15 ms, current - 30 μA. This beam produces a free space flux of H = 8.2 ...


RF discharge in the transverse magnetic field numerical model

A. V. Lukyanova; A. T. Rakhimov; N. V. Suetin IEEE Transactions on Plasma Science, 1991

A numerical model of RF discharges in a steady transverse magnetic field is developed. This model is valid in a range of parameters (gas pressure, magnetic field, RF voltage) used in a number of experimental and technical installations. The comparison between numerical calculations and some experimental results is presented


Exact frequency-domain reconstruction for thermoacoustic tomography. II. Cylindrical geometry

Yuan Xu; Minghua Xu; L. V. Wang IEEE Transactions on Medical Imaging, 2002

For pt. I see ibid., vol. 21, no. 7, p. 823-8 (2002). Microwave-induced thermoacoustic tomography (TAT) in a cylindrical configuration is developed to image biological tissue. Thermoacoustic signals are acquired by scanning a flat ultrasonic transducer. Using a new expansion of a spherical wave in cylindrical coordinates, we apply the Fourier and Hankel transforms to TAT and obtain an exact ...


Oscillatory torque caused by dead time in the current control of high power gearless mills

V. Guerrero; J. Pontt IECON 2011 - 37th Annual Conference of the IEEE Industrial Electronics Society, 2011

In modern high energy industrial processes, high power converters are one of the most important topics in terms of efficiency, energy savings and dynamic behaviour of all electrical drives. In our time, synchronous machines are used in many high power applications, like electric generation (hydroelectric and nuclear plants, etc) transportation (trains, cars, etc), and many more. In the mining industry ...


More eLearning Resources

IEEE-USA E-Books

  • An Overview of HighTemperature Electronic Device Technologies and Potential Applications

    High-temperature electronics applications are found in combustion systems, well logging, industrial processes, air stagnation points in supersonic aircraft, vehicle brakes, nuclear reactors, and dense electronic packages. We summarize physical effects and materials issues important for reliable operation of semiconductor device technologies at high temperatures (>125°C). We review the high-temperature potential of Si, GaAs, other III-V compounds, and SiC. For completeness, we also comment on nitrides, diamond, and vacuum microelectronics. We conclude that Si on insulator (SOI) technology can be developd readily for small signal operation up to about 300°C. There is some ongoing work in this area. GaAs offers little advantage over Si because of poor device isolation and the lack of reliable contacts above 250°C. Other III-V compounds could be developed for operation to 600°C, using processes similar to those used for optoelectronics. There may be a market niche for III-V power devices above 200°C. There is considerable activity in semiconducting SiC, and device functionality has been demonstrated above 600°C. SiC is promising for operation above 300°C, and for power devices at frequencies from de to 10 GHz, but it faces numerous challenges to achieve manufacturable status. We attempt to match technologies with application areas.

  • Appendix 2: Crystal Manufacturers

    Quartz crystal-a technology that changed the tide of World War II Some of the defining leaps in technology in the twentieth century occurred during the Second World War, from radar to nuclear energy. Often left out of historical discussions are quartz crystals, which proved to be just as pivotal to the Allied victory-and to post-war development-as other technologies. Quartz crystals provided the U.S. military, for the first time, with reliable communication on the front lines, and then went on to become the core of some of the most basic devices of the post-war era, from watches, clocks, and color televisions, to cell phones and computers. In Crystal Clear, Richard Thompson relates the story of the quartz crystal in World War II, from its early days as a curiosity for amateur radio enthusiasts, to its use by the United States Armed Forces. It follows the intrepid group of scientists and engineers from the Office of the Chief Signal Officer of the U.S. Army as they ra ed to create an effective quartz crystal unit. They had to find a reliable supply of radio-quality quartz; devise methods to reach, mine, and transport the quartz; find a way to manufacture quartz crystal oscillators rapidly; and then solve the puzzling "aging problem" that plagued the early units. Ultimately, the development of quartz oscillators became the second largest scientific undertaking in World War II after the Manhattan Project. Bringing to light a little-known aspect of World War II, Crystal Clear offers a glimpse inside one of the most significant efforts in the annals of engineering.

  • Chapter 14: Servomechanisms: The Bridge to a New Period

    This chapter contains sections titled: Servomechanisms Development, Wartime Servo Lab Projects, Evolution of Servo Theory, The Postwar Period: Process Control and Nuclear Reactor Instrumentation, Numerical Control of Machine Tools, Toward Computerization of Numerical Control, Computer-Aided Design Project, From Servos to ESL: Expanding Horizons, Dynamic Analysis and Control Laboratory

  • References

    Quartz crystal-a technology that changed the tide of World War II Some of the defining leaps in technology in the twentieth century occurred during the Second World War, from radar to nuclear energy. Often left out of historical discussions are quartz crystals, which proved to be just as pivotal to the Allied victory-and to post-war development-as other technologies. Quartz crystals provided the U.S. military, for the first time, with reliable communication on the front lines, and then went on to become the core of some of the most basic devices of the post-war era, from watches, clocks, and color televisions, to cell phones and computers. In Crystal Clear, Richard Thompson relates the story of the quartz crystal in World War II, from its early days as a curiosity for amateur radio enthusiasts, to its use by the United States Armed Forces. It follows the intrepid group of scientists and engineers from the Office of the Chief Signal Officer of the U.S. Army as they ra ed to create an effective quartz crystal unit. They had to find a reliable supply of radio-quality quartz; devise methods to reach, mine, and transport the quartz; find a way to manufacture quartz crystal oscillators rapidly; and then solve the puzzling "aging problem" that plagued the early units. Ultimately, the development of quartz oscillators became the second largest scientific undertaking in World War II after the Manhattan Project. Bringing to light a little-known aspect of World War II, Crystal Clear offers a glimpse inside one of the most significant efforts in the annals of engineering.

  • The Electron and the Nucleus

    This chapter contains sections titled: Nuclear Electrons to 1932, Heisenberg's N-P Nuclear Model and the Electron, The Role of Cosmic-Ray Multiplicity in Heisenberg's Thinking About Nuclear Electrons, Provisional Solution of the Electron-Nucleus Problem, Are there Electrons in the Nucleus or Not?, Notes, References

  • Geometric Models of Protein Structure and Function Prediction

    This chapter describes how protein structures are obtained experimentally and discusses methods for computing the geometry of protein molecules. There are primarily three experimental techniques for obtaining protein structures namely, X-ray crystallography, solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and recently freeze-sample electron microscopy (cryo-EM). The geometric model of macromolecule amenable to convenient computation is an idealized model, where the shapes of atoms are approximated by three-dimensional balls. The incremental algorithm developed in can be used to compute the weighted tetrahedrization for a set of atoms of different radii. The chapter outlines the algorithm for two-dimensional unweighted Delaunay triangulation. Evolution plays central roles in shaping up the function and stability of protein molecules. The method of analyzing residue substitution rates using continuous-time Markov models and the method of surface mapping of conservation entropy and phylogeny only scratches the surface of this important issue.

  • Sensors, Excitation, and Linearization

    This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction Basic Principles Temperature Sensors Pressure, Flow, and Level Measurement Motion, Vibration, Force, and Tactile Transducers Photometry and Image Sensors Nuclear and Chemical Analyzers Sensor Linearization This chapter contains sections titled: Problems References

  • Energy Storage and Other New Technologies

    This chapter contains sections titled: Energy Storage Energy Storage Concepts and Technologies Smart Grid New Nuclear Plant Designs Carbon Sequestration and Clean Coal Superconductors

  • Project History

    This technological fantasy, the product of the MIT Students System Project and the inspiration for the 1979 film "Meteor," presents a plan for avoiding a hypothetical collision between Earth and the Apollo asteroid, Icarus, which sweeps by every nineteen years within a few million miles (a near-miss in astronomical terms). Collision with a four billion-ton rock would create a catastrophe equal to the destructive power of half a trillion tons of TNT.To prevent tidal waves from washing away the coasts of North America and Europe and shock waves from fracturing the earth's substructure, the Project Icarus plan calls for six 100-megaton hydrogen bombs to be ready for liftoff in sequence from the Kennedy Space Center by six Saturn V rockets in an attempt to push the asteroid off course or to smash it into harmless debris. Clearly, money is no object; all the financial resources of the country are assumed available to the crack Project Icarus team. But time and accuracy are essential.The description of the frantic project schedule from go-ahead to impact includes selection and modification of the launch vehicle and spacecraft; "design" of the nuclear warhead and prediction of its interaction with the asteroid in space; guidance and control of the spacecraft on its critical intercept trajectory; development of an intercept monitoring satellite to gather scientific data from the asteroid and the explosion; the tight management and rigid PERT schedule; and the economic impact of the project.How close to Earth will Icarus's eccentric orbit carry it next time? What are the chances of some other, as yet undiscovered, asteroid -- or worse, a random meteor -- making its way straight for Earth? The MIT team's plan may yet be put to the test.

  • Index

    Quartz crystal-a technology that changed the tide of World War II Some of the defining leaps in technology in the twentieth century occurred during the Second World War, from radar to nuclear energy. Often left out of historical discussions are quartz crystals, which proved to be just as pivotal to the Allied victory-and to post-war development-as other technologies. Quartz crystals provided the U.S. military, for the first time, with reliable communication on the front lines, and then went on to become the core of some of the most basic devices of the post-war era, from watches, clocks, and color televisions, to cell phones and computers. In Crystal Clear, Richard Thompson relates the story of the quartz crystal in World War II, from its early days as a curiosity for amateur radio enthusiasts, to its use by the United States Armed Forces. It follows the intrepid group of scientists and engineers from the Office of the Chief Signal Officer of the U.S. Army as they ra ed to create an effective quartz crystal unit. They had to find a reliable supply of radio-quality quartz; devise methods to reach, mine, and transport the quartz; find a way to manufacture quartz crystal oscillators rapidly; and then solve the puzzling "aging problem" that plagued the early units. Ultimately, the development of quartz oscillators became the second largest scientific undertaking in World War II after the Manhattan Project. Bringing to light a little-known aspect of World War II, Crystal Clear offers a glimpse inside one of the most significant efforts in the annals of engineering.



Standards related to Nuclear

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AAmerican National Standard for Measurement Procedures for Resolution and Efficiency of Wide-Bandgap Semiconductor Detectors of Ionizing Radiation

This standard applies to wide-bandgap semiconductor radiation detectors, such as cadmium telluride (CdTe), cadmium-zinc-telluride (CdZnTe, referred to herein as CZT), and mercuric iodide (HgI2) used in the detection and measurement of ionizing radiation at room temperature; gamma rays, X-rays, and charged particles are covered. The measurement procedures described herein apply primarily to detector elements having planar, hemispherical, or other geometries ...


Americal National Standard for Portable Radiation Detection Instrumentation for Homeland Security


American National Standard Minimum Performance Criteria for Active Interrogation Systems Used for Homeland Security

This standard specifies the operational and performance requirements for active interrogation systems for use in homeland security applications. These systems employ penetrating ionizing radiation (e.g., neutrons, high-energy x-rays, gamma-rays) to detect and identify hidden chemical, nuclear, and explosive agents by detection of stimulated secondary radiations or by nuclear resonance contrast, giving elemental and/or nuclidic identification of the composition of the ...


American National Standard Calibration and Usage of Alpha/Beta Proportional Counters


American National Standard Calibration and Usage of Dose Calibrator" Ionization Chambers for the Assay of Radionuclides"


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