Microscopy

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Microscopy is the technical field of using microscopes to view samples and objects that cannot be seen with the unaided eye (objects that are not within the resolution range of the normal eye). There are three well-known branches of microscopy, optical, electron, and scanning probe microscopy. (Wikipedia.org)






Conferences related to Microscopy

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2016 IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium (IUS)

International Symposium dealing with recent developments on ultrasound, including ultrasound imaging, transducers, non destructuve testing and physical acoustics.

  • 2015 IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium (IUS)

    Annual meeting of the UFFC Society that is being held regularly. It is focusing on ultrasonics.

  • 2013 IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium (IUS)

    the joint IUS, ISAF, IFC, and EFTF conference is aimed at bringing the ultrasonics, ferroelectrics, Frequency Control and Time Forum communities around the world together more closely and through discussions on recent research and development of fundamentals, materials, devices, and applications .

  • 2012 IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium

    The conference will bring together the community of ultrasonics around the world in the center of Europe for discussion and cooperation and to stimulate the research and development in the widespread field of ultrasonic theories and applications

  • 2011 IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium (IUS)

    The Symposium is aimed at bringing the ultrasonics communities around the world together more closely and through discussions on recent research and development of ultrasonics theories and applications.

  • 2010 IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium (IUS)

    The conference will cover all high frequency Ultrasound application including medical.

  • 2009 IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium

    Conference includes short courses on topics of current interest in ultrasonics. The next three days will include parallel oral and poster sessions covering 1) Medical Ultrasonics, 2) Sensors, NDE & Industrial Applications, 3) Physical Acoustics, 4) Microacoustics SAW, FBAR, MEMS, and 5) Transducers & Transducer Materials.

  • 2008 IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium

  • 2007 IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium


2015 IEEE International Reliability Physics Symposium (IRPS)

Sharing information related to cause, effects and solutions in the deign and manufacture of electronics and related components


2014 IEEE 14th International Conference on Nanotechnology (IEEE-NANO)

NANO is the flagship IEEE conference in Nanotechnology, which makes it a must for students, educators, researchers, scientists and engineers alike, working at the interface of nanotechnology and the many fields of electronic materials, photonics, bio-and medical devices, alternative energy, environmental protection, and multiple areas of current and future electrical and electronic applications. In each of these areas, NANO is the conference where practitioners will see nanotechnologies at work in both their own and related fields, from basic research and theory to industrial applications.

  • 2012 IEEE 12th International Conference on Nanotechnology (IEEE-NANO)

    The conference scope covers a wide range in nanoscience and technology. In particular, it covers nanofabrication, nanomanufacturing, nanomaerials, nanobiomedicine, nanoenergy, nanoplasmonics, nanoelectronics, nanosensors and nanoactuators, characterisation and modelling of nano structures and devices. Research in both experiments and simulation is reported. Industry is encouraged to present its research projects.

  • 2011 10th Conference on Nanotechnology (IEEE-NANO)

    1. Nanomaterials and Nanostructures 2. Nanoelectronics and Nanodevices 3. Nanophotonics 4. Nano biotechnology and Nanomedicine 5. Nanorobotics and NEMS

  • 2011 IEEE 11th International Conference on Nanotechnology (IEEE-NANO)

    All areas of nanotechnology within the areas of IEEE interest, as covered by the member societies of the Nanotechnology Council.

  • 2010 IEEE 10th Conference on Nanotechnology (IEEE-NANO)

    - More Moore, More than Moore and Beyond-CMOS - Nano-optics, Nano-Photonics, Plasmonics, Nano-optoelectronics - Nanofabrication, Nanolithography, Nano Manipulation, Nanotools - Nanomaterials and Nanostructures - Nanocarbon, Nanodiamond, Graphene and CNT Based Technologies - Nano-sensors and Nano Membranes - Modeling and Simulation - System Integration (Nano/Micro/Macro), NEMS, and Actuators - Molecular Electronics, Inorganic Nanowires, Nanocrystals, Quantum Dots

  • 2009 9th IEEE Conference on Nanotechnology (IEEE-NANO)

    THE CONFERENCE FOCUSES ON THE APPLICATION OF NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY. SPECIFICALLY, BOTH ENGINEERING ISSUE RELATED TO NANOFABBRICATION , NANOELECTRONICS, SENSOR SYSTEMS WILL BE COVERED IN ADDITION FOUNDAMENTAL ISSUES SUCH AS MODELLING, SYNTHESIS, CARACTARIZATION ETC.


2014 IEEE 40th Photovoltaic Specialists Conference (PVSC)

The PVSC is a technical conference dedicated to the science and application of photovoltaics for solar electricity generation. Technical Program Areas: 1. Fundamentals and New Concepts for Future Technologies 2. Thin Film Polycrystalline Photovoltaics 3. III-V and Concentrator Technologies 4. Crystalline Silicon Technologies 5. Thin Film Silicon Based PV Technologies 6. Organic Photovoltaics 7. Space Technologies 8. Characterization and Measurement Methods 9. PV Modules and Manufacturing 10. PV Systems and Applications 11. PV Velocity Forum


INTERMAG 2014 - IEEE International Magnetics Conference

Intermag is the premier conference on applied magnetics which allows scientists and engineers from all over to world to meet and discuss novel developments in magnetics, magnetic materials and associated technologies.


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Periodicals related to Microscopy

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Antennas and Propagation, IEEE Transactions on

Experimental and theoretical advances in antennas including design and development, and in the propagation of electromagnetic waves including scattering, diffraction and interaction with continuous media; and applications pertinent to antennas and propagation, such as remote sensing, applied optics, and millimeter and submillimeter wave techniques.


Engineering in Medicine and Biology Magazine, IEEE

Both general and technical articles on current technologies and methods used in biomedical and clinical engineering; societal implications of medical technologies; current news items; book reviews; patent descriptions; and correspondence. Special interest departments, students, law, clinical engineering, ethics, new products, society news, historical features and government.


Nanobioscience, IEEE Transactions on

Basic and applied papers dealing both with engineering, physics, chemistry, and computer science and with biology and medicine with respect to bio-molecules and cells. The content of acceptable papers ranges from practical/clinical/environmental applications to formalized mathematical theory. TAB #73-June 2001. (Original name-IEEE Transactions on Molecular Cellular and Tissue Engineering). T-NB publishes basic and applied research papers dealing with the study ...


Quantum Electronics, IEEE Journal of

Generation, amplification, modulation, detection, waveguiding, or techniques and effects that can affect the propagation characteristics of coherent electromagnetic radiation having submillimeter and shorter wavelengths


Reliability, IEEE Transactions on

Principles and practices of reliability, maintainability, and product liability pertaining to electrical and electronic equipment.


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Most published Xplore authors for Microscopy

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Xplore Articles related to Microscopy

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A new approach to exact cone-beam reconstruction without Radon transform

H. Kudo; N. Miyagi; T. Saito 1998 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium Conference Record. 1998 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference (Cat. No.98CH36255), 1998

Most exact cone-beam reconstruction methods are based on the Tuy-Smith- Grangeat formula which links cone-beam projections to the 3-D Radon transform. The computation of the 3-D Radon transform in these methods leads to drawbacks such as much computational requirements and significant discretization errors. The authors propose new exact cone-beam reconstruction method which does not explicitly compute the 3-D Radon transform. ...


A study on assembling of sub pictures using approximate junctions

K. Morita; K. Kurosu Systems, Man, and Cybernetics, 1999. IEEE SMC '99 Conference Proceedings. 1999 IEEE International Conference on, 1999

It is important to develop a method of assembling a set of sub pictures automatically into a mosaic picture, because a view through fiberscopes or microscopes with higher magnifying power is much larger than the field of view taken by a camera. This paper presents a method of assembling sub pictures, where roughly estimated junctions called approximate junctions are employed ...


Improving the field emission property of zinc oxide by directly growing on graphene layer

Ning Zhao; Chenyan Shi; Ke Qu; Chi Li; Wei Lei; Xiaobing Zhang 2013 IEEE 14th International Vacuum Electronics Conference (IVEC), 2013

Zinc oxide was directly grown on the graphene layer by the hydrothermal synthesis method, and the field emission property of this hybrid structure was tested by a diode structure device. Compared with the Zinc oxide directly grown on the silicon substrates, the hybrid emitter shows better performance in the field emission properties, including low turn-on field, threshold field and high ...


High-Throughput Screening of Amorphous <formula formulatype="inline"><tex Notation="TeX">$hbox{Y}_{2} hbox{O}_{3}$</tex></formula>&#x2013;<formula formulatype="inline"><tex Notation="TeX">$hbox{TiO}_{2}hbox{/}hbox{SiO}_{2}$</tex> </formula> Higher <formula formulatype="inline"><tex Notation="TeX">$kappa$</tex></formula> Gate Dielectric Layers

Kao-Shuo Chang; Martin L. Green; Peter K. Schenck; Igor Levin; Eswaranand Venkatasubramanian IEEE Transactions on Electron Devices, 2012

In this paper, an approach using native SiO2 to make amorphous higher dielectric constant films based on the Y2O3-TiO2/SiO2/Si compositional spread libraries by combinatorial pulsed laser deposition is reported. The key feature of the experiment is that combinatorial methodology is used to quickly screen the potential high-dielectric-constant films out of a large composition parameter space. Scanning X-ray microdiffractometry and high-resolution ...


Images of electron transmission through thin diamond films

J. L. Shaw; F. N. Wood; J. E. Yater; K. L. Jensen; B. B. Pate; J. M. Hanna; T. I. Feygelson; J. E. Butler 2011 24th International Vacuum Nanoelectronics Conference, 2011

Images of electron emission from an 8 micron thick diamond sheet, resulting from electron bombardment on a limited area of the back side, reveal emission from the entire negative electron affinity surface. This shows electrons move several hundred microns from the generation volume before being emitted, probably in states at the surface.


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Educational Resources on Microscopy

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eLearning

A new approach to exact cone-beam reconstruction without Radon transform

H. Kudo; N. Miyagi; T. Saito 1998 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium Conference Record. 1998 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference (Cat. No.98CH36255), 1998

Most exact cone-beam reconstruction methods are based on the Tuy-Smith- Grangeat formula which links cone-beam projections to the 3-D Radon transform. The computation of the 3-D Radon transform in these methods leads to drawbacks such as much computational requirements and significant discretization errors. The authors propose new exact cone-beam reconstruction method which does not explicitly compute the 3-D Radon transform. ...


A study on assembling of sub pictures using approximate junctions

K. Morita; K. Kurosu Systems, Man, and Cybernetics, 1999. IEEE SMC '99 Conference Proceedings. 1999 IEEE International Conference on, 1999

It is important to develop a method of assembling a set of sub pictures automatically into a mosaic picture, because a view through fiberscopes or microscopes with higher magnifying power is much larger than the field of view taken by a camera. This paper presents a method of assembling sub pictures, where roughly estimated junctions called approximate junctions are employed ...


Improving the field emission property of zinc oxide by directly growing on graphene layer

Ning Zhao; Chenyan Shi; Ke Qu; Chi Li; Wei Lei; Xiaobing Zhang 2013 IEEE 14th International Vacuum Electronics Conference (IVEC), 2013

Zinc oxide was directly grown on the graphene layer by the hydrothermal synthesis method, and the field emission property of this hybrid structure was tested by a diode structure device. Compared with the Zinc oxide directly grown on the silicon substrates, the hybrid emitter shows better performance in the field emission properties, including low turn-on field, threshold field and high ...


High-Throughput Screening of Amorphous <formula formulatype="inline"><tex Notation="TeX">$hbox{Y}_{2} hbox{O}_{3}$</tex></formula>&#x2013;<formula formulatype="inline"><tex Notation="TeX">$hbox{TiO}_{2}hbox{/}hbox{SiO}_{2}$</tex> </formula> Higher <formula formulatype="inline"><tex Notation="TeX">$kappa$</tex></formula> Gate Dielectric Layers

Kao-Shuo Chang; Martin L. Green; Peter K. Schenck; Igor Levin; Eswaranand Venkatasubramanian IEEE Transactions on Electron Devices, 2012

In this paper, an approach using native SiO2 to make amorphous higher dielectric constant films based on the Y2O3-TiO2/SiO2/Si compositional spread libraries by combinatorial pulsed laser deposition is reported. The key feature of the experiment is that combinatorial methodology is used to quickly screen the potential high-dielectric-constant films out of a large composition parameter space. Scanning X-ray microdiffractometry and high-resolution ...


Images of electron transmission through thin diamond films

J. L. Shaw; F. N. Wood; J. E. Yater; K. L. Jensen; B. B. Pate; J. M. Hanna; T. I. Feygelson; J. E. Butler 2011 24th International Vacuum Nanoelectronics Conference, 2011

Images of electron emission from an 8 micron thick diamond sheet, resulting from electron bombardment on a limited area of the back side, reveal emission from the entire negative electron affinity surface. This shows electrons move several hundred microns from the generation volume before being emitted, probably in states at the surface.


More eLearning Resources

IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Introduction

    Engineering has been an essential collaborator in biological research and breakthroughs in biology are often enabled by technological advances. Decoding the double helix structure of DNA, for example, only became possible after significant advances in such technologies as X-ray diffraction and gel electrophoresis. Diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis improved as new technologies -- including the stethoscope, the microscope, and the X-ray -- developed. These engineering breakthroughs take place away from the biology lab, and many years may elapse before the technology becomes available to biologists. In this book, David Lee argues for concurrent engineering -- the convergence of engineering and biological research -- as a means to accelerate the pace of biological discovery and its application to diagnosis and treatment. He presents extensive case studies and introduces a metric to measure the time between technological development and biological discovery.Investigating a series of major biological discoveries that range from pasteurization to electron microscopy, Lee finds that it took an average of forty years for the necessary technology to become available for laboratory use. Lee calls for new approaches to research and funding to encourage a tighter, more collaborative coupling of engineering and biology. Only then, he argues, will we see the rapid advances in the life sciences that are critically needed for life-saving diagnosis and treatment.

  • References

    Engineering has been an essential collaborator in biological research and breakthroughs in biology are often enabled by technological advances. Decoding the double helix structure of DNA, for example, only became possible after significant advances in such technologies as X-ray diffraction and gel electrophoresis. Diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis improved as new technologies -- including the stethoscope, the microscope, and the X-ray -- developed. These engineering breakthroughs take place away from the biology lab, and many years may elapse before the technology becomes available to biologists. In this book, David Lee argues for concurrent engineering -- the convergence of engineering and biological research -- as a means to accelerate the pace of biological discovery and its application to diagnosis and treatment. He presents extensive case studies and introduces a metric to measure the time between technological development and biological discovery.Investigating a series of major biological discoveries that range from pasteurization to electron microscopy, Lee finds that it took an average of forty years for the necessary technology to become available for laboratory use. Lee calls for new approaches to research and funding to encourage a tighter, more collaborative coupling of engineering and biology. Only then, he argues, will we see the rapid advances in the life sciences that are critically needed for life-saving diagnosis and treatment.

  • Index

    Engineering has been an essential collaborator in biological research and breakthroughs in biology are often enabled by technological advances. Decoding the double helix structure of DNA, for example, only became possible after significant advances in such technologies as X-ray diffraction and gel electrophoresis. Diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis improved as new technologies -- including the stethoscope, the microscope, and the X-ray -- developed. These engineering breakthroughs take place away from the biology lab, and many years may elapse before the technology becomes available to biologists. In this book, David Lee argues for concurrent engineering -- the convergence of engineering and biological research -- as a means to accelerate the pace of biological discovery and its application to diagnosis and treatment. He presents extensive case studies and introduces a metric to measure the time between technological development and biological discovery.Investigating a series of major biological discoveries that range from pasteurization to electron microscopy, Lee finds that it took an average of forty years for the necessary technology to become available for laboratory use. Lee calls for new approaches to research and funding to encourage a tighter, more collaborative coupling of engineering and biology. Only then, he argues, will we see the rapid advances in the life sciences that are critically needed for life-saving diagnosis and treatment.

  • From Peas To Genome: Engineering-Enabled Biological Research

    Engineering has been an essential collaborator in biological research and breakthroughs in biology are often enabled by technological advances. Decoding the double helix structure of DNA, for example, only became possible after significant advances in such technologies as X-ray diffraction and gel electrophoresis. Diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis improved as new technologies -- including the stethoscope, the microscope, and the X-ray -- developed. These engineering breakthroughs take place away from the biology lab, and many years may elapse before the technology becomes available to biologists. In this book, David Lee argues for concurrent engineering -- the convergence of engineering and biological research -- as a means to accelerate the pace of biological discovery and its application to diagnosis and treatment. He presents extensive case studies and introduces a metric to measure the time between technological development and biological discovery.Investigating a series of major biological discoveries that range from pasteurization to electron microscopy, Lee finds that it took an average of forty years for the necessary technology to become available for laboratory use. Lee calls for new approaches to research and funding to encourage a tighter, more collaborative coupling of engineering and biology. Only then, he argues, will we see the rapid advances in the life sciences that are critically needed for life-saving diagnosis and treatment.

  • Discovery of Chromosomes and the Submicrometer Microscope

    This chapter contains sections titled: Mendel's Peas, 1866, The Early Biochemists, 1830-1890, Microscopy and the Discovery of Chromosomes, 1878, Pioneers of Light Spectroscopy

  • LeadFree Reflow and Rework

    This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction Printability of Lead-Free Solder Pastes Soak Versus Ramp Temperature Profiles Effect of Peak Temperature Versus Reflow Performance Effect of Reflow Atmosphere on Solderability of Lead-Free Solder Convection Versus IR Reflow Ovens Reflow Temperature Delta on Boards and Components Visual Inspection of Lead-Free Soldered Joints Automated Optical Inspection (AOI) X-ray Inspection of Lead-Free Soldered Joints Acoustic Microscopy Inspection of Components Before and After Lead-Free Reflow Lead-Free Rework of BGA/CSP Soldered Joints Lead-Free Hand-Soldering Rework In-Circuit Testing and Functional Testing (ICT/FT) of Soldered Joints Yield Data Surface-Mount Fillet Lifting and Reliability of Reflowed Soldered Joints Conclusions Future Work Acknowledgments References

  • Analytical Techniques for Materials Characterization

    This chapter contains sections titled: Overview X-Ray Diffraction Raman Spectroscopy Scanning Probe Microscopy Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy Confocal Microscopy Auger Electron Spectroscopy X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry This chapter contains sections titled: References Exercises

  • Related Technologies

    Advances in physics, molecular biology, and computer science are converging on the capacity to control, with molecular precision, the structure and function of matter. These twenty original contributions provide the first broad-based multidisciplinary definition and examination of the revolutionary new discipline of molecular engineering, or nanotechnology. They address both the promise as well as the economic, environmental, and cultural challenges of this emerging atomic-scale technology.Leaders in their field describe current technologies that feed into nanotechnology - atomic imaging and positioning, protein engineering, and the de novo, design and synthesis of self-assembling molecular structures. They present development strategies for coordinating recent work in chemistry, biotechnology, and scanning-probe microscopy in order to successfully design and engineer molecular systems. They also explore advances in molecular and quantum electronics as well as reversible computational systems and the fundamental physical constraints on computation. Additional chapters discuss research efforts in Japan and present the prospects of nanotechnology as seen from the perspective of a microtechnologist.The final section looks at the implications of success, including the prospects of enormous computational power and the radical consequences of molecular mechanical systems in the fields of medicine and life extension.BC Crandall is Cofounder and Vice President of Prime Arithmetics, Inc.Contributors: Robert Birge. Federico Capasso. BC Crandall. K. Eric Drexler. Gregory Fahy. Richard Feynman. John Foster. Tracy Handel. Bill Joy. Arthur Kantrowitz. Joseph Mallon. Norman Margolus. Ralph Merkle. Lester Milbrath. Gordon Tullock. Hiroyuki Sasabe. Michael Ward.

  • What Public Policy Pitfalls Can Be Avoided in the Development and Regulation of Nanotechnology?

    Advances in physics, molecular biology, and computer science are converging on the capacity to control, with molecular precision, the structure and function of matter. These twenty original contributions provide the first broad-based multidisciplinary definition and examination of the revolutionary new discipline of molecular engineering, or nanotechnology. They address both the promise as well as the economic, environmental, and cultural challenges of this emerging atomic-scale technology.Leaders in their field describe current technologies that feed into nanotechnology - atomic imaging and positioning, protein engineering, and the de novo, design and synthesis of self-assembling molecular structures. They present development strategies for coordinating recent work in chemistry, biotechnology, and scanning-probe microscopy in order to successfully design and engineer molecular systems. They also explore advances in molecular and quantum electronics as well as reversible computational systems and the fundamental physical constraints on computation. Additional chapters discuss research efforts in Japan and present the prospects of nanotechnology as seen from the perspective of a microtechnologist.The final section looks at the implications of success, including the prospects of enormous computational power and the radical consequences of molecular mechanical systems in the fields of medicine and life extension.BC Crandall is Cofounder and Vice President of Prime Arithmetics, Inc.Contributors: Robert Birge. Federico Capasso. BC Crandall. K. Eric Drexler. Gregory Fahy. Richard Feynman. John Foster. Tracy Handel. Bill Joy. Arthur Kantrowitz. Joseph Mallon. Norman Margolus. Ralph Merkle. Lester Milbrath. Gordon Tullock. Hiroyuki Sasabe. Michael Ward.

  • High-Speed 3D Spectral Imaging with Stimulated Raman Scattering

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy is a powerful technique for label-free biomedical imaging in real time and in 3D. Indeed, SRS provides chemical contrast of sample molecules reflecting molecular vibrations in a quantitative manner. However, in previous SRS microscopy, it has been difficult to discriminate different molecules with overlapping Raman bands since SRS microscopy visualizes molecular vibrations at a single frequency, which is determined by the optical frequency difference between two-color excitation laser pulses. In order to improve the molecular specificity of SRS microscopy, it will be advantageous to conduct spectral imaging, where SRS images at various Raman shifts are acquired. This chapter reviews the current status of SRS microscopy and discusses how spectral imaging can be accomplished in SRS microscopy. Then the recent development of our high-speed SRS spectral microscopy is introduced. This system enables video-rate SRS imaging while the vibrational frequency is varied in a frame-by-frame manner. Furthermore, in order to discriminate different constituents, spectral images are processed by modified independent component analysis. Spectral imaging of biological tissues in 3D is demonstrated.



Standards related to Microscopy

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