Conferences related to Lasers

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2019 IEEE 46th Photovoltaic Specialists Conference (PVSC)

Photovoltaic materials, devices, systems and related science and technology


2019 IEEE 69th Electronic Components and Technology Conference (ECTC)

premier components, packaging and technology conference


2019 IEEE International Conference on Industrial Technology (ICIT)

The scope of the conference will cover, but will not be limited to, the following topics: Robotics; Mechatronics; Industrial Automation; Autonomous Systems; Sensing and artificial perception, Actuators and Micro-nanotechnology; Signal/Image Processing and Computational Intelligence; Control Systems; Electronic System on Chip and Embedded Control; Electric Transportation; Power Electronics; Electric Machines and Drives; Renewable Energy and Smart Grid; Data and Software Engineering, Communication; Networking and Industrial Informatics.


2019 IEEE Photonics Conference (IPC)

The IEEE Photonics Conference, previously known as the IEEE LEOS Annual Meeting, offers technical presentations by the world’s leading scientists and engineers in the areas of lasers, optoelectronics, optical fiber networks, and associated lightwave technologies and applications. It also features compelling plenary talks on the industry’s most important issues, weekend events aimed at students and young photonics professionals, and a manufacturer’s exhibition.


2019 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS)

robotics, intelligent systems, automation, mechatronics, micro/nano technologies, AI,


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Periodicals related to Lasers

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Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine, IEEE

The IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine publishes articles concerned with the various aspects of systems for space, air, ocean, or ground environments.


Antennas and Propagation, IEEE Transactions on

Experimental and theoretical advances in antennas including design and development, and in the propagation of electromagnetic waves including scattering, diffraction and interaction with continuous media; and applications pertinent to antennas and propagation, such as remote sensing, applied optics, and millimeter and submillimeter wave techniques.


Applied Superconductivity, IEEE Transactions on

Contains articles on the applications and other relevant technology. Electronic applications include analog and digital circuits employing thin films and active devices such as Josephson junctions. Power applications include magnet design as well asmotors, generators, and power transmission


Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Broad coverage of concepts and methods of the physical and engineering sciences applied in biology and medicine, ranging from formalized mathematical theory through experimental science and technological development to practical clinical applications.


Device and Materials Reliability, IEEE Transactions on

Provides leading edge information that is critical to the creation of reliable electronic devices and materials, and a focus for interdisciplinary communication in the state of the art of reliability of electronic devices, and the materials used in their manufacture. It focuses on the reliability of electronic, optical, and magnetic devices, and microsystems; the materials and processes used in the ...


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Xplore Articles related to Lasers

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Quest to semiconductor intraband terahertz lasers : From p-Ge intersubband and CR lasers to cascade and Si donor Raman lasers

[{u'author_order': 1, u'affiliation': u'Institute for Physics of Microstructures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhny Novgorod 603950 GSP-105, Russia', u'authorUrl': u'https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/author/37265891500', u'full_name': u'Alexander A. Andronov', u'id': 37265891500}] 2006 Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics and 2006 Quantum Electronics and Laser Science Conference, 2006

Survey of research directed to create semiconductor intraband THz lasers based on bulk Ge and Si samples and on quantum well systems is given. Some recent proposals and observations in the field are also covered.


Dual-frequency solid-state lasers for optical and microwave telecommunications

[{u'author_order': 1, u'affiliation': u"Lab. d'Electronique Quantique-Phys. des Lasers, Rennes I Univ., France", u'authorUrl': u'https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/author/37274293600', u'full_name': u'M. Alouini', u'id': 37274293600}, {u'author_order': 2, u'affiliation': u"Lab. d'Electronique Quantique-Phys. des Lasers, Rennes I Univ., France", u'authorUrl': u'https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/author/37325811500', u'full_name': u'N.D. Lai', u'id': 37325811500}, {u'author_order': 3, u'affiliation': u"Lab. d'Electronique Quantique-Phys. des Lasers, Rennes I Univ., France", u'authorUrl': u'https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/author/37265892900', u'full_name': u'M. Brunel', u'id': 37265892900}, {u'author_order': 4, u'affiliation': u"Lab. d'Electronique Quantique-Phys. des Lasers, Rennes I Univ., France", u'authorUrl': u'https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/author/37265985100', u'full_name': u'M. Vallet', u'id': 37265985100}, {u'author_order': 5, u'affiliation': u"Lab. d'Electronique Quantique-Phys. des Lasers, Rennes I Univ., France", u'authorUrl': u'https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/author/37323500800', u'full_name': u'O. Emile', u'id': 37323500800}, {u'author_order': 6, u'affiliation': u"Lab. d'Electronique Quantique-Phys. des Lasers, Rennes I Univ., France", u'authorUrl': u'https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/author/37283592300', u'full_name': u'A. Le Floch', u'id': 37283592300}, {u'author_order': 7, u'affiliation': u"Lab. d'Electronique Quantique-Phys. des Lasers, Rennes I Univ., France", u'authorUrl': u'https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/author/37284103700', u'full_name': u'F. Bretenaker', u'id': 37284103700}] Summaries of Papers Presented at the Lasers and Electro-Optics. CLEO '02. Technical Diges, 2002

Summary form only given. Radio-on-fiber applications require the use of local oscillators in the GHz range carried by an optical frequency. Such a GHz modulation can be directly created by the beat note of the two eigenstates of the laser. Usually lasers are designed to oscillate in a single state of polarization. However, in the general case, a laser exhibits ...


All-fiber Raman lasers with highly nonlinear photonic crystal fibers

[{u'author_order': 1, u'affiliation': u"Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers, Atomes et Mol\xe9cules, UMR CNRS 8523, IRCICA, FR CNRS 3024, Universit\xe9 des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, 59655 Villeneuve d'Ascq, France", u'authorUrl': u'https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/author/37887722900', u'full_name': u'G. Beck', u'id': 37887722900}, {u'author_order': 2, u'affiliation': u"Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers, Atomes et Mol\xe9cules, UMR CNRS 8523, IRCICA, FR CNRS 3024, Universit\xe9 des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, 59655 Villeneuve d'Ascq, France", u'authorUrl': u'https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/author/37892101300', u'full_name': u'F. Anquez', u'id': 37892101300}, {u'author_order': 3, u'affiliation': u"Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers, Atomes et Mol\xe9cules, UMR CNRS 8523, IRCICA, FR CNRS 3024, Universit\xe9 des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, 59655 Villeneuve d'Ascq, France", u'authorUrl': u'https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/author/37704898600', u'full_name': u'S. Randoux', u'id': 37704898600}, {u'author_order': 4, u'affiliation': u"Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers, Atomes et Mol\xe9cules, UMR CNRS 8523, IRCICA, FR CNRS 3024, Universit\xe9 des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, 59655 Villeneuve d'Ascq, France", u'authorUrl': u'https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/author/37541145400', u'full_name': u'L. Bigot', u'id': 37541145400}, {u'author_order': 5, u'affiliation': u"Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers, Atomes et Mol\xe9cules, UMR CNRS 8523, IRCICA, FR CNRS 3024, Universit\xe9 des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, 59655 Villeneuve d'Ascq, France", u'authorUrl': u'https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/author/37278321700', u'full_name': u'M. Douay', u'id': 37278321700}, {u'author_order': 6, u'affiliation': u'Draka, route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis, France', u'authorUrl': u'https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/author/37275162900', u'full_name': u'G. Melin', u'id': 37275162900}, {u'author_order': 7, u'affiliation': u'Draka, route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis, France', u'authorUrl': u'https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/author/37275127300', u'full_name': u'A. Fleureau', u'id': 37275127300}, {u'author_order': 8, u'affiliation': u'Draka, route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis, France', u'authorUrl': u'https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/author/37590336100', u'full_name': u'L. Galkovsky', u'id': 37590336100}, {u'author_order': 9, u'affiliation': u'Draka, route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis, France', u'authorUrl': u'https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/author/37275123600', u'full_name': u'S. Lempereur', u'id': 37275123600}, {u'author_order': 10, u'affiliation': u"Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers, Atomes et Mol\xe9cules, UMR CNRS 8523, IRCICA, FR CNRS 3024, Universit\xe9 des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, 59655 Villeneuve d'Ascq, France", u'authorUrl': u'https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/author/37265146100', u'full_name': u'P. Suret', u'id': 37265146100}] 2009 Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics and 2009 Conference on Quantum electronics and Laser Science Conference, 2009

Writing Bragg gratings inside the core of a photonic crystal fiber (PCF), we demonstrate an all-fiber Raman laser fully made with a highly nonlinear PCF. The laser delivers an output power of 4 Watt.


Correlation of supermode noise of harmonically modelocked lasers

[{u'author_order': 1, u'affiliation': u'College of Optics, Center for Research & Education in Optics & Lasers, University of Central Florida, Orlando, USA 32816-2700', u'authorUrl': u'https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/author/37269231400', u'full_name': u'S. Gee', u'id': 37269231400}, {u'author_order': 2, u'affiliation': u'College of Optics, Center for Research & Education in Optics & Lasers, University of Central Florida, Orlando, USA 32816-2700', u'authorUrl': u'https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/author/37269232800', u'full_name': u'F. Quinlan', u'id': 37269232800}, {u'author_order': 3, u'affiliation': u'College of Optics, Center for Research & Education in Optics & Lasers, University of Central Florida, Orlando, USA 32816-2700', u'authorUrl': u'https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/author/37269222100', u'full_name': u'S. Ozharar', u'id': 37269222100}, {u'author_order': 4, u'affiliation': u'College of Optics, Center for Research & Education in Optics & Lasers, University of Central Florida, Orlando, USA 32816-2700', u'authorUrl': u'https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/author/37278163300', u'full_name': u'P. J. Delfyett', u'id': 37278163300}] 2006 Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics and 2006 Quantum Electronics and Laser Science Conference, 2006

Two types of supermode noise, uncorrelated and correlated, are demonstrated for two different types of harmonically modelocked lasers. The correlated supermode noise is originated from the excitation of multiple correlated optical supermodes.


IEE Colloquium on 'Gas Lasers - Art and Applications' (Digest No.63)

[] IEE Colloquium on Gas Lasers - Art and Applications, 1988

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Educational Resources on Lasers

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eLearning

No eLearning Articles are currently tagged "Lasers"

IEEE.tv Videos

Breaking Spectral and Performance Barriers for Diode Lasers - Plenary Speaker, Manijeh Razeghi - IPC 2018
Hertz-Class Brillouin Lasing with Nanokelvin Thermal Sensing - William Loh - Closing Ceremony, IPC 2018
An IEEE IPC Special Session with Alexander Spott of The Optoelectronics Research Group
Electrically-Pumped 1.31 μm MQW Lasers by Direct Epitaxy on Wafer-Bonded InP-on-SOI Substrate - Yingtao Hu - Closing Ceremony, IPC 2018
Ultrafast Lasers for Multi-photon Microscopy - Plenary Speaker: Jim Kafka - IPC 2018
Lasers in Your Living Room with Mitsubishi's New LaserVue TVs
IEEE Edison Medal - Eli Yablonovich - 2018 IEEE Honors Ceremony
Larson Collection interview with Arthur L. Schawlow
2011 IEEE Awards Edison Medal - Isamu Akasaki
Capturing Sound with Smoke and Lasers
Young Professionals in Photonics - 2016 IEEE Photonics Conference
LiFi: Misconceptions, Conceptions and Opportunities - Harald Haas Plenary from the 2016 IEEE Photonics Conference
Women in Photonics Workshop Introduction - 2016 IEEE Photonics Conference
Integrated Photonics Manufacturing Initiative - Michael Liehr Plenary from the 2016 IEEE Photonics Conference
Engendering Gender Competence - 2016 IEEE Photonics Conference
Quantum Communication for Tomorrow - W.J. Munro Plenary from 2016 IEEE Photonics Conference
Intro to Women in Photonics - 2016 IEEE Photonics Conference
Life at a Photonics Startup - 2016 IEEE Photonics Conference
Optically Interconnected Extreme Scale Computing - Keren Bergman Plenary from the 2016 IEEE Photonics Conference
IEEE Magnetics Distinguished Lecture - Mitsuteru Inoue

IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Solid‐State Lasers

    This chapter defines solid‐state lasers more precisely and explains their general operation. It describes the most important solid‐state lasers, including the classic ruby laser, neodymium, ytterbium, and a family of related materials in which laser emission can be tuned across a range of wavelengths. The chapter covers solid‐state lasers with nonfiber form factors, including rods, slabs, and thin disks. Optical pumping has been the key to success for most solid‐state lasers. A solid‐state laser material generally has two essential components: light‐emitting atoms called the active species and a host solid in which those atoms are embedded called the host. Lasers with broad gain bandwidth are important because they allow both tuning of the laser wavelength and generation of extremely short pulses, both of which are important for laser applications. In vibronic lasers, the lower laser level is a band spanning a range of energy levels arising from atomic vibrations in the solid‐state laser host.

  • Diode and Other Semiconductor Lasers

    This chapter covers electrically powered lasers made from semiconductors. It starts by defining the types of electrically powered lasers and describing the key optical and electrical properties of light‐emitting semiconductors. The chapter covers the various types of semiconductor diode lasers and compares them to nonlaser light‐emitting diodes (LEDs). The progress of diode lasers owes much to the development of structures to confine and control the flow of light and electrons in semiconductors. The chapter provides a brief description of laser diode fabrication and covers layered structures parallel to the junction and structures fabricated in the device plane. It also describes the two primary classes of laser diode emitters: edge emitting diode lasers and surface‐emitting diode lasers. The optical properties of diode lasers depend on their semiconductor composition, their cavity structures, and whether they are single emitters or part of an array. Quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) are semiconductor lasers which differ fundamentally from diode lasers.

  • Lasers in Research

    Lasers have brought a revolution in spectroscopy, the study of the interaction between light and matter. The crucial breakthrough was the development of tunable laser sources. Another fascinating research use of lasers is in manipulating tiny objects with light. Two important variations are optical trapping and laser cooling. Another laser technique has helped ground‐based optical astronomy approach the resolution of the Hubble Space Telescope. Nanoscale lasers are hard to build almost by definition because optical photons have wavelengths of several hundred nanometers. The free‐electron lasers have emerged as important X‐ray “light sources” for research. The big advantage of X‐ray lasers is that their peak power per unit wavelength is far brighter than other X‐ray sources. Quantum optics promise weird and wonderful capabilities in cryptography and computing. One emerging application is using that quantum entanglement as a way to encrypt data and develop inherently secure data transmission techniques.

  • Other Lasers and Laser‐Like Sources

    Some light sources generate laser‐like light but not by stimulated emission in an oscillator. This chapter describes these lasers and laser‐like sources and explains how they work. It covers some emerging laser concepts that may find important applications in the future. Dye lasers are based on a family of large organic molecules that get their bright colors from transitions between complex sets of electronic and vibrational energy levels. Tuning across a much broader wavelength range is possible with a family of nonlinear devices called optical parametric sources. Frequency combs are very attractive for spectroscopy and measurement applications because they contain many evenly spaced spectral lines, promising very accurate measurements of time and wavelength. Extreme‐ultraviolet lasers operate on electronic transitions, but they are very different than the electronic transitions of conventional lasers. Free‐electron lasers can operate across a wide range of electromagnetic spectrum, from microwaves to X‐rays, depending on the electron energy and the magnetic field.

  • Fiber Lasers and Amplifiers

    This chapter talks about fiber lasers, which technically are a type of solid‐state laser, but differ in important ways from the other solid‐state lasers. Simple optical fibers have a circular core of glass with a high refractive index surrounded by a circular cladding with lower refractive index. The selection of doped fibers is crucial in fiber laser design. In most cases, the doped central core has a small diameter for single‐mode operation. The most important rare earths for fiber lasers are ytterbium, erbium, thulium, and holmium. A separate family of fiber lasers (and amplifiers) is based not on rare‐earth doped fibers but on an effect called Raman scattering that occurs when photons lose or gain a bit of extra energy when they bounce off atoms in undoped glass fibers. Fiber Raman amplification is attractive in telecommunication systems because the amplification can take place in the undoped core of the fiber transmitting the signals.

  • How Lasers Work

    This chapter describes how lasers work. Lasers transform energy rather than producing it. Most lasers transform electric current into a beam of light in one or more steps. The chapter explores the general principles of laser operation. The starting point for making a laser is producing the population inversion needed for stimulated emission. The resonant cavity for a microwave maser is a metal box that resonates at the microwave frequency. The intensity distribution across a laser beam is crucial for many applications. That distribution depends on a set of transverse modes that exist across the width of the laser beam, separate from the longitudinal modes. Two factors dominate the choice of laser excitation techniques: energy efficiency and the physical nature of the laser medium. Two types of light sources are used for optical pumping: intense lamps emitting white light, usually in pulses, and other lasers.

  • Gas Lasers

    This chapter explores the basics of gas lasers and talks about the most important types. Gas‐laser media can be divided into three main types based on the light‐emitting species: atomic gases, molecular gases, and excimers. Like helium‐neon lasers, argon‐ and krypton‐ion lasers are powered by electric discharges passing through elements of the rare‐gas column of the periodic table. Helium‐cadmium (He‐Cd) lasers emit continuous beams at powers from under a milliwatt to tens of milliwatts, slightly more powerful than helium‐neon, but less powerful than argon lasers. The carbon dioxide laser is exceptionally versatile and highly efficient. It operates under a wide variety of conditions, emitting a steady beam at low gas pressure or pulses at high pressures. Gas lasers powered by a chemical reaction are known as chemical lasers. The chapter provides a brief description of the hydrogen fluoride/deuterium fluoride (HF/DF) laser and the chemical oxygen/iodine laser (COIL).

  • Laser Types, Features, and Enhancements

    Lasers may emit continuously or in pulses of various durations, produced in different ways. Their emission bandwidth ranges from fixed and extremely narrow to tunable across a wide range. This chapter explains these differences. The most commercially important short‐pulsed molecular gas lasers are based on a family of short‐lived diatomic molecules called excimers, which give the lasers their name. Semiconductor lasers work quite differently than the solid‐state lasers, which is why laser specialists do not classify semiconductors as solid‐state. The free‐electron laser is large and complex, but it is tunable across an exceptionally broad range of wavelengths, making it attractive for research. Energy storage within a laser depends on the physics of the laser medium as well as the pumping. The attraction of optical pumping for wavelength conversion is that it converts cheap photons from readily available pump lasers into more valuable photons at hard‐to‐get wavelengths.

  • High‐Power Laser Applications

    This chapter covers major applications of high‐power lasers, which deliver enough energy to significantly alter materials they illuminate. High‐power laser applications involve a number of considerations that may not be immediately obvious but are essential for successful use of lasers. Materials working involves cutting, welding, drilling, and otherwise modifying industrial materials, including both metals and nonmetals. Laser medicine is based on understanding how laser light interacts with tissue. Laser photochemistry has long been considered a promising technology, but that promise has been hard to realize. Government research on laser‐driven nuclear fusion began in the 1960s and has continued since then with the dual goals of developing civilian fusion reactors and military simulation of the explosion of hydrogen (thermonuclear) bombs. The chapter discusses the missions for laser weapons, the technology required, the problems that have been encountered, and the types of lasers that have been investigated.

  • Low‐Power Laser Applications

    This chapter covers applications that require low laser power, typically well under a watt. An important emerging new market for lasers is laser radars or lidars for autonomous cars. The principle of lidar is the same as microwave radar. Some major advantages and some important limitations of lasers are listed in a table. Low‐power lasers are widely used to read printed symbols. The laser spot scans across a surface, and a detector measures changes in the reflected light as the beam moves. The biggest single application of lasers in terms of the number of lasers sold has been for playing and/or recording information on optical disks. Lasers have proved invaluable for many types of measurements. Laser instruments have long been used in surveying and construction alignment. Laser light shows emerged after bright argon and krypton lasers became available. Argon provides the green and blue beams and krypton emits in the red.



Standards related to Lasers

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